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Sunday July 5th 2015

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July 2015 Alley Newspaper: Neighborhood Plan for Roof Depot City Says “NO!” Phillips Aquatic Center School Board says, “YES!”

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A Historic Decision! COMMENTARY: Mpls. School Board made a magnanimous commitment of money and intent to youth and the Phillips Aquatic Center partnering with the Mpls. Park Board

empty-poolBY DENNY BENNETT, Minneapolis Swims, Board of Directors, president

Tuesday night June 23, was historic! In a most selfless and noble act, the Minneapolis School Board passed a resolution MPS Board giving $1.75M in capital, in addition to their $150K annual operating commitment to the Phillips Aquatic Center.

These 10 lanes are going to change Minneapolis! Another $500K to go!

There is a potential “Angel Donor” who may, in the wake of MPS’s selfless gift step up and give us the money we need to get to the 8-lane configuration anyway! Exciting stuff! We’ll know soon!

Historic, Selfless, Noble? Really? Yes, really!

First, let me begin by saying that tonight caps years of efforts by this group to convince Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS) of the virtues of swimming, and why Phillips, of all places, was the one neighborhood that most deserved this type of gift from the coffers of the MPS treasury. With MPS firmly entrenched in the philosophy of not investing capital in properties they do not own, and many budget fires of their own to put out, we resigned ourselves to never receiving capital dollars from MPS towards this project.

Of course, once it is built, we need to make sure it is sustainable, so we were quite pleased to get MPS to agree to a 5 year commitment to contribute $150,000 towards operating costs.

As our fundraising gained momentum over the past year, and some of the players on the MPS board changed, and the neighborhoods stepped up with significant money, things changed. The Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board (MPRB) took notice, other donors took notice, and a swimming task force at MPS was set up, and they took notice.

With the MPRB getting close to “picking a final pool”, there were some “what if” conversations with MPS board members along the lines of, “What if you had 50% ownership of the Phillips Aquatics Center, and it was going to be a 2 pool 8-lane/4-lane facility, where you could use the 8-lane pool to host swim meets? In that instance, would you consider a capital contribution?” In a school district that only has 1 competition pool, a 6-lane pool, this was interesting.

In the meantime, MPRB passed their resolution, choosing the pool with the 6/4 configuration, and although still about $2.4M short, saying they would finance the difference.

My conversations with MPS continued. Interim MPS Superintendent Gore was portrayed as being opposed to the board on this issue, however, in reality, he just didn’t know anything about the Phillips Aquatics Center yet. He met with MPRB Superintendent Miller on multiple occasions to get a good understanding of how they could best help on the project, and how overall, they could establish a new level of collaboration on a multitude of different projects and priorities that each of them had.

In the end, these two organizations have realized that they serve the same public, and in many instances they have facilities and services that do or should overlap, and that be working together, they can both be more efficient and effective and deliver a better product or service to us. That is how we have ended up with a thoughtful MPS resolution that has the work “Park” in it many times and results in a selfless gift that puts, not their needs first, but the needs of the people, who with the MPRB, they serve together, first.

So yes, Historic, Selfless and Noble.

What’s next? Well, there’s still the issue of about $500,000 to raise to complete this 6/4 capital campaign. We are hoping that everyone who’s given, can give just a little more, and we’ll get there, I promise. Finally, I do have a most exciting prospect who has the ability to step in, and in the Minneapolis spirit of selflessness, write the check we need to bridge the gap to get the competition pool to 8-lanes. I’ll know one way or another by the next issue o The Alley. Stay tuned!

Read the resolution at http://bit.ly/1TNOAeJ

Denny Bennett, Minneapolis Swims Board of Directors, president

denny@dennybennett.com

www.minneapolisswims.org

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COMMENTARY: The City Says “NO” to our Efforts to Clean Up Air Pollution and to Seek a Better Future for East Phillips

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By Carol Pass, Chair, East Phillips Improvement Coalition, EPIC.

In spite of their continuing rhetoric about ‘equity’, the City of Minneapolis is rapidly moving forward with their long-hidden plans to intensify the air pollution and traffic congestion problems of what has become known by area residents as the “Intersection of Death”, 28th St. and Cedar Avenue South, with its dangerous, toxic and foul-smelling air, its numerous massive and unsightly trucks, its impossible traffic congestion and its many nearby families with children and several ethnic daycare centers. The Ways and Means Committee of the City Council voted Monday, June 15th,  4 to 1 with one abstention to approve the intensification of these problems and on Friday, June 19th,  in a 10 to 3 decision the City Council followed suit, in spite of the many letters, petitions and loud protests of your neighbors  and many area  organizations.

The Back Story:

Last November the East Phillips Improvement Coalition, EPIC, voted to begin a final campaign after all our others to remove the existing major polluting industries from East Phillips, i.e. Smith Foundry and the hot asphalt plant, Bituminous Roadways, and replace them with light industry and residential housing along the Greenway,  changing  this area to a place worthy of Highway 55 as the City’s International Gateway from the airport. Residents’ motivation came primarily in response to new science that has shown dramatically that all of this pollution is far worse for children than has been known in the past.  ADHD and asthma recently figured far more heavily in the childhood health impacts resulting from these industries.  EPIC, to implement our vote, began pressuring these industries to move and started building a movement to de-industrialize this area around the “Intersection of Death”.

It was at that point that the City planners and Public Works came out of the woodwork and revealed their nearly completed and never-before-seen plan to add to the polluting industries by buying the Roof Depot site at 1860 East 28th Street and moving the City Public Water Works facility there, bringing to this already congested area 68 more massive trucks, 24 of them diesel, plus numerous other oversized vehicles, back hoes, bulldozers, etc. and also all the vehicles needed to bring 100 employees to and from the site for work, none of whom live in Phillips.

This plan would add to the polluting industries, inflicting on us the opposite of the de-industrialization we had hoped to achieve. The City acknowledged to us that they had been planning this behind our backs since 2001.  They had completely ignored telling the community about this, ignoring all community engagement for more than a decade.  Had we not begun an “anti-pollution/protect the neighborhood children” effort, some of us think we never would have known about this until the giant trucks began rolling through the neighborhood near the completion of the project.

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Albert Emmanuel Nelson: Quarter Century Steward of the Sacred-Grounds, Stones, and Stories

Albert E. Nelson, caretaker of Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery, from 1928 until 1953, standing at the graves of Philander and Mary Prescott. Members of the Hennepin History Society had the Prescotts’ marker enclosed in stones from the first Central High School in 1926. Hennepin County History Museum Special Collections

Albert E. Nelson, caretaker of Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery, from 1928 until 1953, standing at the graves of Philander and Mary Prescott. Members of the Hennepin History Society had the Prescotts’ marker enclosed in stones from the first Central High School in 1926. Hennepin County History Museum Special Collections

By Sue Hunter Weir

It’s a safe bet that Albert Emanuel Nelson loved Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery more than anyone else ever has.  From 1928 until 1953 he was responsible for overseeing the care and maintenance of the cemetery grounds, for conserving and protecting the cemetery’s records, and for serving as the cemetery’s one-man public relations firm.

That’s what he was paid to do, but it does not begin to capture the reverence with which he approached his work.  His interest in the cemetery and the lives of the people buried there—“the builders of Minneapolis,” as he called them– was his passion as well as his day job.  He spent his free time assembling a library of more than 100 volumes of local history and gathering information for the book that he intended to write.  There was a lot of information and gathering it was a time consuming task in those pre-internet days.

Albert Nelson was born in Minneapolis on February 1, 1892, a little more than 30 years after the start of the Civil and Indian wars, but close enough in time to them to have heard first-hand accounts from veterans and their families.  The veterans and Minnesota’s territorial pioneers were of special interest to him, and he was also deeply interested in the lives of Swedish immigrants like his parents Nels and Anna Nelson.

Albert was Nels and Anna’s only child.  It is not clear what happened to Nels but by 1893, shortly after Albert was born, Anna began describing herself as a widow and was faced with the task of raising her son by herself.  She worked as a “laundress,” washing and ironing the clothes for a private family and on occasion she took in boarders.  Albert left school after completing the sixth grade.  By the age of 15 he was working as an apprentice, most likely to a confectioner since by age 17 he was working as a clerk in a candy store.  At age 18 he was employed as an elevator operator at a downtown hotel.  When the 1920 census was taken, he was working as a laborer for the Minneapolis Park Board. Read the rest of this entry »

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EPIC Report-July 2015

EPICReportforJulyAlley2015

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Midtown Phillips Neighborhood Association News July 2015

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July 2015 Ventura Village Neighborhood News

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July 2015 Spirit of Phillips-Freedom’s Just Another Word…

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Frank Reflections

By Frank Erickson

100 years ago White men who lynched Black men went off to fight “wars” to defend themselves and their country against aggression.

But these White men should not have been left alive to kill anyonein “war”—since they should have been killed for being terrorists by the people they were terrorizing.  Yet those who opposed lynching 100 years ago did not have the violent capacity to have a “War on Terror” against the White racists.

So goes the slippery slope of claiming your right to defend yourself using violence—It is your capacity to use violence that rules the day, not your justification.

There is a long back and forth history of violence used by members of an exclusive club who commit acts of aggression but then have the capacity to use violence based on their claims of defending themselves—example, U.S. Drone attacks.

The U.S. Government will imit air strikes on ISIL if near civilians, but the box office susscess of”merican Sniper” shows that the U.S. is entertained by the slaughter of Iraqis, rather than concerned about it. Read the rest of this entry »

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Cut Worms And Radishes

By Peter Molenaar

“Cut worms” are members of the largest family in the Lepidoptera, i.e., they are larvae of a moth.  It was not a rabbit which murdered your tender young tomato, it was the devil incarnate.

Behold the innocent one, plump and curled in the form of a C beneath the severed plant.  What role in nature did its ancestors play?  What Karmic consequences might ensue should you destroy it?

In this matter, I choose to honor my Christian grandmother.  Straighten the “worm” between thumbs and forefingers, meditate briefly, then pop it in two.

On the other hand, experienced gardeners will follow mitigating steps:  1.) weed and rake the garden clean before turning the soil in late autumn, 2.) turn the soil again come spring, 3.) plant a trap crop.

Who can eat a hundred radishes?  Plant them in April, weeks before setting out expensive transplants.  A few fallen radishes will reveal the whereabouts…

Hmmm…philosophical notes:

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