NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Friday September 21st 2018

Keep citizen journalism alive!

Donatebutton_narrow

Archives

September 2018 Alley Newspaper

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Alley Update – September 2018

What Does It Mean To Be a Community Newspaper?

The first issue of The Alley Newspaper was produced in January 1976 making this mighty community newspaper 42 years old. Alley Communications is the non-profit (501c3) organization whose mission is to inform and engage members of our community, to increase community awareness and to promote community connections and conversations among and between its residents, businesses, and organizations. Neighborhood residents are the publication’s reporters and writers telling their stories in their own words. The Alley is made available free to readers, a reflection of the commitment to providing barrier-free access to information and knowledge.

Unlike traditional media sources that write articles about our community most often by folks who do not live here or with little stake in our wellbeing, The Alley Newspaper lifts up the many diverse voices and ways of knowing of the people who live and work here. We are also able to tell positive stories of the people who live here and the systemic influences that pertain to some of the more negative occurrences within our community.

At this important time of transition for the organization, it is essential that Alley Communications is transparent in its deliberation about its challenges and subsequent changes. That is why the leadership chose to form a Transition Team of Alley Newspaper writers and readers to help us think through the challenges, opportunities and possibilities. Most importantly, that is why we have dedicated this entire page to update you, are readers. Together—readers, writers, organizational supporters, advertisers, board members, financial contributors and other stakeholders—we are what makes a community newspaper.

Challenges Facing The “Business” Of Publishing The Paper

Each month The Alley offers a variety of articles, some specific to that time, others that are recurring features. The publishing goal is to provide stories that are both vibrant and interesting. In Phillips, there is no end of news. There is, however, a limit to available funds and that, in turn, constrains the amount of space for publication. The cost of each Newspaper to produce and deliver is $.55 per each copy. This means that if you are reading this article in this “FREE” newspaper right now, it cost Alley Communications 55 cents to get it into your hands! That cost is absorbed entirely within the budget of the nonprofit The Alley organization at no cost to the readers, as has been the commitment since 1975.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Wizard Marks, assiduous artisan of articulation, bestowed a treasure trove of written wisdom

Wizard Marks’ Alley writings are “Bound for the Future” at Libraries.
Wizards Marks left indelible marks (pun intended) with superb articles and extensive investigative reports for The Alley from mid 1980s to 1990s. Her excellent work is now bound within reprinted Alley Newspapers in hard-cover volumes at the Hennepin County Franklin Community Library and the Hennepin County Minneapolis Library.

Wizard Marks 1943-2018

Wizard Maureen Marks was born in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1943 to Elizabeth Ruth Marks Halpin and Vincent Paul Halpin, and raised in a WWII federal housing project called “English Woods.” “It was a ghetto away from other neighborhoods, a ghetto in the woods,” Marks said and “because it was segregated, it was inhabited by hillbillies.”—her people.

Cincinnati is the first major stop north of the Mason-Dixon Line along the Dixie Highway, the main migration route for hillbillies. In those days, federal projects did not allow tenants to paint the walls and no one was to plant flowers or vegetables. These strictures were more effective than anything else in cutting people off from their pasts, since they had always dug and planted, harvested and canned and dried. It made them lonely and disoriented and made the transition to the city harder and meaner. Women embroidered putting their gardens on pillowcases and towels, hankies and tablecloths, blouses and baby bonnets. Treasures were small and portable, skills and feelings and memories were all of a piece and stitched into the fabric of life through these formalities and through genealogies and stories told while sewing and cooking.

“My mother, known as Esse, did beautiful embroidery. However, the women in the family early observed of me that ‘she handles a needle like it was a hammer.’ I was four when I decided to write.”

At English Woods, Marks was taught to read and write by the “good Sisters of St. Francis.” Later she attended Southern Illinois University where she “studented for too long and sometimes to no purpose.”

In Minnesota, Marks helped organize the first toy-lending library in the state, and later worked for the Metropolitan Transit Commission, and with her “familiar Morgan le Fey, feline” resided in south Minneapolis. “There is a big garden,” she said.

Mark’s experience as a bus driver has led to THIS IS NOT A REAL BUS, a collection of stories by and about transit workers. Marks also wrote SPEECHES NOBODY INVITED ME TO GIVE.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Historic Messiah Church demolished!

HARVEY WINJE
By early afternoon August 21, 2018 only the Messiah Church Balcony, main entrance with Bell Tower, and office portion of this 101 year old Community and Architectural Historic building remains adjacent to the Clinics and 700 car parking ramp already built on Block 5 Chicago/Columbus E. 25th and 26th Streets where Children’s Hospital previously demolished the entire block contrary to legal and ethical binding Covenant with the Phillips Community and neighbors.

Children’s Hospital completes demolition of Block 5 and community’s TRUST

BY HARVEY WINJE

Children’s Minnesota spent over 1 million dollars to buy and demolish (during the last two weeks of August 2018) the last structure on Block 5 between Chicago and Columbus Avenues and East 25th Street and East 26th Streets.

Children’s Minnesota at its Minneapolis location violated the Covenant they and other hospitals have had with the Phillips Community for decades when they purchased and now totally demolished two churches, one gasoline/repair station and 28 homes. This loss of housing is a travesty when so many are unstably housed and the city explains that we must quickly add more availability of housing stock before 2040! It is also a travesty to lose the history and beauty of historic landmark religious sanctuaries that harbor memories of thousands of residents. It was purposeful that the thousands of hours of conversations and negotiations between residents and hospital executives marked Block 5 of the 12 Block Covenant to remain residential along with the two churches that stood there.

Children’s Hospital did not perform this destruction on their own; two other institutions, Messiah Church Congregation and Project for Pride in Living were complicit in this surreptitious devastation of Block 5, its ensuing insult to residents, and of the trouncing of the trust built between residents and institutions by their selling a total of six parcels of land and buildings to the hospital instead of honoring the Covenant. Their financial interests and greed “trumped” legal and ethical responsibility to the broader Community.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Houses and churches demolished! But loss of trust is the larger tragedy!

BY HARVEY WINJE

A personal note of transparency:

1953: At age 13, I was taught to trust leaders by Reverend Dr. Leonard Kendall, Messiah Church Pastor, in the Catechism class in the basement of that same church. He strictly taught that when in class or in the Sanctuary facing the leader at the front, we were never to glance back or worry about any noise or activity behind us because our trust must be in the leader at the front who will always have our backs! It is uncertain whether that advice came from his U.S. Marine Corp training or Biblical study. In either case, he was wrong. Subsequent leadership betrayed trust. The leader cannot always be trusted!

1973: Twenty years later, Messiah Church Pastor Rev. Peter Erickson stood in the Sanctuary strictly advocating that the Messiah Congregation, Minnesota Lutheran Church in America (MNLCA) and the national LCA deny a funding request from the American Indian Movement (AIM) because of how they would use the money. AIM, founded in Minneapolis (1968) to improve Native American housing, education, employment, and the restoration of civil rights and cultural traditions previously granted in Treaties with the U.S. Government, advocated for Treaty Rights in all states and especially in Wounded Knee, South Dakota in 1973. Erickson impugned and demeaned AIM members, leadership, and motives. Erickson continued the betrayal of the trust that made the Treaties possible and validated the breaking of the Treaties by the U.S. The leader cannot always be trusted!

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Confluence of people, stories, organizations, and betrayal

History’s woven web: “Newspapers are the first rough DRAFT of history.”

BY HARVEY WINJE

Cathy’s Grade ‘A’ Café, mentioned in Donna Neste’s tribute to Wizard Marks, was a storefront in a corner building at 25th and Chicago Avenue designed by Alexander, Fraser, Rose—Architect and built by Simonson Construction Company for Dr. Olaf A. Olson who lived on the same block in a beautiful house on a double lot with a small orchard and garden at 2516 Chicago Avenue. Project for Pride in Living bought the house for an office, tool library, and headquarters in the late 1970s during which time an Alley Newspaper Office was there while Luke Longstreet Sullivan, a Vista Volunteer, was Editor of 7 issues from May to December 1977. PPL sold the double lot and house with three garages and at least two other lots and houses to a developer amassing all of the properties on the block to sell surreptitiously to Children’s Hospital because it violated a Covenant between the hospital and the Community.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

What’s up at the Franklin Community Library – September 2018

BY ERIN THOMASSON

All Ages

Henna Workshop
Sunday, Sept. 30, 1-3 pm
Discover the history and science of henna through paste-making and cone-rolling demonstrations led by artist Amy Leinen. Then, using tips and tricks, apply henna yourself. Materials provided. Funded by Minnesota’s Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

Teen Programs

Flash Fiction for Teens
Thursday, Sept. 20, 5-6:30 pm
Grades 8-12. Registration Required. Short short stories, often limited to a single page, have become very popular and are a great way to hone your skills for setting a scene, describing a character and hooking readers. Collaborator: The Loft Literary Center. Funded by Minnesota’s Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

Adult Programs

Financial Literacy for the Rest of Us: You Are Not a Loan
Friday, Sept. 14, 3-4:30 pm
Workshop 1 with Cassie Thornton and Max Haiven in a series building community and hope through a discussion of debt, wealth and value. Over the past 50 years, more people have come to rely on debt just to cover basic expenses. Who benefits from this system, and who pays? Look at the larger picture of our financial system through interactive lecture, group problem solving, games and films and see how we can work together to overcome the isolating and depressing power of debt. Collaborator: ReImagining Value Action Lab (RiVAL).

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Marie Sandvik Center – September 2018

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Phillips West

Phillips West Neighborhood Events: www.phillipswest.info

By CRYSTAL WINDSCHITL

Thursday, September 6th, 6-7 pm
Phillips West Monthly Community Meeting!
Join your neighbors and other Community Partners for updates from Local City Government & Minneapolis Police. Meeting will take place at the Center for Changing Lives Building in the Centrum Room (2400 Park Avenue). Free parking is available in the rear of building off of Oakland Avenue. Free Jakeeno’s Pizza Dinner will be provided! If you would like more information or would like to get involved in the neighborhood please contact Crystal at 612-879-5383 or email her at pwno2005@yahoo.com

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Metro Transit – Bus driver shortage causes service cuts

By JOHN CHARLES WILSON

The 18 August 2018 schedule change at Metro Transit is more complicated than usual because there was an emergency 1% service cut made on 31 July. Unfortunately, service cuts are nothing new to public transit. However, this last one was made for an unprecedented reason: a shortage of bus drivers. Usually, service cuts happen due to lack of funding, but now Metro Transit has been so short of drivers that several scheduled bus trips a day, usually at rush hour, just simply didn’t run because there was no driver!

A formal service cut was declared, in order to create a schedule where every expected bus would show up as it should. With the August schedule change, some of the deleted trips have been restored; this was apparently made possible by cancelling some underused school trips, especially in the mornings.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
 Page 1 of 182  1  2  3  4  5 » ...  Last »