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Saturday April 19th 2014

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April 2014 Alley Newspaper

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Two Pointy Sticks and a Piece of String: Knitting Exhibit at Ingebretsen’s – Latvian and Norwegian Inspirations

This Mitten Display on an Ingebretsen Classroom wall  is one example of Diane Thomson’s Textile Art that makes the room so charming and inspiring 

By Carstens Smith

Two Pointy Sticks and a Piece of String: The Knitted Art of Diane Thomson is an exhibit of intricately made mittens and hats that will be on display in the Ingebretsen’s classroom until the end of April.

Diane Thomson is a knitter and an instructor at Ingebretsen’s. She focuses on creating mittens and hats in the tradition of Latvian and Norwegian knitting; her work is multi-colored with lively geometric designs throughout. The exhibit’s title comes from a comment Diane made regarding the art of knitting: “It’s amazing what you can do with two pointy sticks and a piece of string.” It’s certainly amazing to see what Diane does with those tools.

Surprisingly, Diane is not a life-long knitter. She had to knit for a high school class and found it to be “boring and tedious.” Years later, Diane had her first child and she wanted to knit handmade mittens and hats for her new daughter, the way Diane’s mother had done for her. There was now a reason for knitting and Diane found it much more appealing.

Some of the most beautiful traditional mitten designs come from Latvia. Diane was inspired by Lizbeth Upitis, a designer who makes knitting patterns based on Latvian designs and symbols. The mittens are much more than something to keep loved ones’ hands warm. The symbols convey blessings and prayers for protection. Many pairs of Diane’s Latvian mittens, along with information on the meanings of the patterns, are included in the exhibit.

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Carved stone lambs mark a few of the scores of children’s graves

Lambs are often on the gravestones of children depicting youthfulness and innocence. Religious meaning for some is in relation to Biblical verses about the Lamb of God and the Shepherd guding his flock of young lambs and older sheep. Many lambs of Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery have weathered or disappeared as have approximately 700 other tombstones.

Lambs are often on the gravestones of children depicting youthfulness and innocence. Religious meaning for some is in relation to Biblical verses about the Lamb of God and the Shepherd guding his flock of young lambs and older sheep. Many lambs of Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery have weathered or disappeared as have approximately 700 other tombstones.

By Sue Hunter Weir

Rampant, communicable diseases caused early deaths now preventable

On the north side of the cemetery, in one of the blocks of graves overlooking the Midtown Greenway, there are nine lots divided into half-size graves. They are children’s graves, mostly from the early-to-mid 1890s. It’s not clear why the cemetery’s owners set aside these special sections for children at that particular time. It may have been to meet the needs of parents who couldn’t afford full-sized graves but who didn’t want their children buried in the paupers’ section of the cemetery. It’s may be that parents found comfort in the idea of their children being surrounded by other children. It may reflect a greater-than-usual mortality rate among young children. It may well have been some combination of all three.

While there are more markers in these sections than the Potters Field, not every grave was marked. Those that were had small markers, usually marble, and often they had three-dimensional carved lambs resting on top of the stones. Minnesota weather has not been kind to those markers and many of the lambs are no longer recognizable as such.

A headline in the August 11, 1895, issue of the Minneapolis Tribune declared that July had been a “Bad Month for Children.” And it certainly was. In June fifty-four children under the age of five had died in Minneapolis. In July, that number had jumped to 158. Forty-five of the children who died in July are buried in Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery.

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St. Paul’s History: by Pastoral Eras and Anecdotal Notes of Growth and Change

Rev. O. A. Bergh 1872-1873

St Paul’s Congregation was organized July 6, 1872.

Rev. Chr. O. Brohaugh 1874-1880

The church property at 4th Street and 15th Avenue was purchased from “The First Congregational Society of Minneapolis” for $2,500.

Rev. F. H. Carlson 1880-1884

StP’s on April 9, 1883 decided to move the old church to the rear of the lot and erect a new house of worship. A 1927 newspaper clipping says when the old church was sold, the new church was built, “just before the first horse-car line between Mpls.& St. Paul on Washington and University Ave.” “Mpls’ population was only 50,000.” StP was the City’s third Scandinavian Lutheran church.

Rev. I. Eistinson 1884-1893

1887 membership was “330 souls” with 80 voting members. The choir began in 1890, continuing without interruption to today.

Rev. K. C. Holter 1894-1897

The congregation continued to experience steady growth with all worship services exclusively in Norwegian until 1898.

Rev. N. J. Lohre 1898-1903

English services began on the second and fourth Sunday evenings of the month; all services in English in 1937. Total expenses in 1899 were $1,935. In 1900, the Ladies’ Aid installed a steel ceiling in the church auditorium at a cost of $540.00.

Rev. Martin Norstad 1903-1911

God blessed the work as it continued under the direction of Pastor Martin Norstad.

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Global Worship 7 Concert Set May 4

St. Paul’s Lutheran Congregation

1901 Portland Ave. Celebrates 132 Years of growth and the 1964 “March” to their 4th Sanctuary 50 years agoThe Golden Jubilee includes a Global Concert of multi-cultural and multi-language music May 4th and their Annual BridgeBuilder Award.

1.20c StP photo #2IMG_97762014 BridgeBuilders Award Goes to Rev. Cher Moua

By Roland Wells

The Twin Cities’ rich cultural heritage will be highlighted for the seventh year by a huge concert event, “Global Worship 7,” 4 PM, Sunday, May 4 at the historic St. Paul’s Church in downtown Minneapolis. Musicians from ten cultures will share an evening of unique and exciting worship. Music will include Latino, Oromo-Ethiopian, Vietnamese, Karen-Burmese, Hmong, Russian, African-American and more. The past several years have seen a standing-room only audience.

Global Worship is a unique concert of praise and worship by people from many cultures and languages. Musical styles are tremendously varied, with joyful Christian praise being led by folks in their colorful cultural clothing and exotic instruments from around the world.

The “BridgeBuilder Award” is given each year to an outstanding Twin Cities leader, chosen for their efforts in bringing together people of various cultures. This year’s recipient will be Hmong-American leader, Rev. Cher Moua of Union Gospel Mission and the Cross-Cultural Evangelical Free Church on St. Paul’s east side. Pastor Moua has been tireless in his work of uniting the Twin Cities’ Christian community through his work at the Union Gospel Mission, as well as serving on the boards of Bethel University, the Minnesota Prayer Breakfast, MissionShift, and the 2003 National Ethnic Workers’ Summit. Earlier recipients of the event’s BridgeBuilder Award have included Robert E. Robinson and Dan and Sandy Adler.

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“All the world is a stage”: In the Heart of the Beast Theatre uses mask and puppetry to interpret and teach history

The Phillips History Museum Display high-up in the Midtown Exchange Historic Building recently had many exciting displays from the HOBT Phillips History by Community Youth.  The top photo here is a poster board illustrating the history of Little Earth of United Tribes housing and community center.  The lower photo is a large collage of many Alley Newspaper pages.  Sandy Spieler, HOBT Artistic Director, and Lead Artist Gustavo Boada explained  that when this design is viewed from a distance it gives an impressive impact of the power of the press and how it provides insightful reading when up-close about specific events and activities throughout Phillips over the last 38 years in the Phillips Community and surrounding neighborhoods, too.

By Harvey Winje

For the 40th year, Cedar Field, East 25th Street, Bloomington Avenue, East 34th Street, and Powderhorn Lake and Park become “the stage” as Heart of the Beast Theatre  (HOBT) organizes, orchestrates, choreographs and teaches the dynamic artistry of theatre and the ancient drama of masks and puppets.  Shakespeare’s words, “All the world’s a stage” via the  comedy, “As You Like It” come to mind but, perhaps, too obvious  of a description.

During the months between MayDay Parades and Festivals,  In the Heart of the Beast Theatre Company is not content to bring the drama and the comedy only to their inside stage at the Avalon Theatre, 1500 East Lake Street.  They continue mentoring and bringing forth the natural talents of their audiences, who often are the actors of the next play, parade or pageant.  HOBT becomes a traveling troupe that goes to towns, schools, community centers, and “town squares”- illustrating to groups the art of mask-making, drawing, assembling, shaping, telling, and enacting their stories.  Sometimes, it is for one afternoon and sometimes it is several days over a few months.  One such extended experience was with existing groups in the same community in which HOBT’s own Theatre is located, the Phillips Community.

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T-SHIRT Design Competition Invitation

Deadline for Design Submittal:  Sunday, Aug. 17th, 2014

To Phillips YOUTH

for

2014 Phillips Community

Clean Sweep Event

Saturday, October 11th 2014

DESIGN DETAILS:

  • Eye catching front design
  • One color is preferred; two colors acceptable.
  • Must include:
    • 2014
    • Phillips Community Clean Sweep
    • Green Sweep
    • East Phillips, Midtown Phillips, Phillips West,

Ventura Village and Little Earth

  • T-Shirt color and contrasting ink colors suggestion

ALL SUBMISSIONS become the property of the Selection Committee

THE WINNING DESIGN will be edited and finalized for printing

THE WINNER will receive $55.00, two T-Shirts, Set of 26 “Spirit of Phillips” greeting cards by Dave Moore and Linnea Hadaway ($45. Value) and recognition as the Winning Designer and Featured in The Alley Newspaper.

SUBMIT DESIGNS TO:

            Brad Pass, bpass@usinternet.com  or 2536 18th Ave. S., Mpls., MN 55404 – Phone 612-916-8478 – Fax 612-722-5509

clean-sweep

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Mr. Peabody & Sherman

mr-peabody-sherman-25462-1920x1080By Howard McQuitter II

Mr. Peabody & Sherman (2014) 

****

DreamWorks. Animation/Adventure/Family

Cast: Ty Burrell (Mr. Peabody, voice), Max Charles (Sherman, voice), Ariel Winter (Penny Peterson, voice), Leslie Mann (Patty Peterson, voice), Guillaune Arestos (Robespierre, voice), Lauri Fraser (Marie Antoinette/Egyptian Woman, voice), Stanley Tucci (Leonardo da Vinci, voice). (PG) Running time:92 minutes. Languages: Spanish/English. Director: Rob Minkoff.

I find myself going back in time–fondly–with “Peabody’s Improbable History” as a segment of “Rocky and His Friends” which debuted on ABC in 1959 and later known as “The Bullwinkle Show” on NBC. The animation show created by Jay Wards Productions as a half-hour cartoon featured Bullwinkle J. Moose and Rocket J. Squirrel of Frostbite Falls, Minnesota, and their archenemies Boris Badenov and Natasha Fatale; then there is Mountie Dudley Do-Right, a good but Fractured Fairy Tales” narrated by the mellow voice of comic actor Edward Everett Horton.

Rob Minkoff’s (“The Lion King” [1994],”Stuart Little” [1999], “Stuart Little 2”[2002]) “Mr. Peabody’s & Sherman “live in a Manhattan penthouse unlike the plain “white” house of my boyhood where the Dog and his Boy lived. Back then and now, Mr. Peabody (Ty Burrell) and Sherman (Max Charles), the former the smartest dog in the world, a bespectacled beagle, a Nobel Prize winner, who adopts a human boy named Sherman. Sherman also wears glasses. Between the two, they invent the WABAC (pronounced way-back) Machine.

Mr. Peabody sends Sherman to school where he’s initially bullied by Penny Peterson (Ariel Winter of “Modern Family”). Penny’s parents bring her to Mr. Peabody and Sherman’s upscale Manhattan pad to mend things between their daughter and Sherman. Peabody tells Sherman to keep the WABAC strictly confidential between them. That confidentiality is broken when Sherman enthusiastically shows Penny the WABAC and before she knows it she’s thrown back to the Egypt of 1332 B.C. Sherman and Peabody hold off parents until dog and his boy crank up the WABAC back to ancient Egypt only to bring a reluctant Penny forward back to 21st century Manhattan.

Before Peabody and Sherman meet Penny, the brainy beagle and his geeky boy use the WABAC to go back to late 18th century France to see Maria Antoinette (voice by Lauri Fraser) standing among other aristocrats as she allegedly utters “Let them eat cake”, referring to the hungry peasants in the streets. And before long, Peabody and Sherman are entangled in the Reign of Terror, Antoinette hauled off to the guillotine with Peabody mistakenly to be one of the guillotine but slips down to a tunnel where he and Sherman escape.

The movie explores things the TV series doesn’t such as why a brilliant dog would adopt a human boy, an orphan boy at that. Nonetheless, the movie manages to much of its charm although, I must say, short of the original. But by the end, “Mr. Peabody & Sherman” will delight children and adults alike. Look for the word “eponymous” on Sherman’s lunchbox.

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April 2014 Spirit of Phillips

april-2014-spirit-of-phillips

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Too Much To Ask?

by Peter Molenaar

March 10…

Lord knows that the industrial grinding wheel imposes an arduous task upon a worker. Nonetheless, I am happy to have returned to Smith Foundry in the aftermath of hip replacement surgery. It is, after all, $20 / hour plus benefits.

Note: in Minnesota, 137,000 children live with parents who earn the minimum wage.

February 25…

Hundreds gathered at the capitol rotunda to demand: “Raise the Wage.” Lead by Organized Labor, representatives of constituent nationalities were the featured speakers. The finale featured the song of Ojibwe drums.

March 3rd…

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