NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Saturday October 20th 2018

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October 2018 Alley Newspaper

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Franklin/Hiawatha Encampment Still here! Resilient, resourceful and committed despite trauma and genocide

Safe, affordable housing sought by descendants on land ancestors honored for millennia

CAMILLE GAGE
BULLETIN! Council approves Site! 4 PM Sept. 26th
11 MN tribal nations Leaders, Gov. Mark Dayton, and Mayor Frey met; tribal leadership offered 2109 Cedar Av So., 1.25 acres, owned by Red Lake Nation (was Ambles), for a  Navigation Center. All 11 tribal nations supported that site. Frey said: “Thank you tribal leadership, particularly Red Lake Nation. Today’s Council vote reaffirms that site is culturally appropriate and equipped to provide for the safety and health of people at the Franklin/Hiawatha Encampment. The City will prepare the site and work with the native community for a smooth transition while protecting everyone’s health and safety.” HN Cty, nonprofit partners and community will develop and implement the services at the Navigation Center with support from the City. The Encampment will remain until Center opens this Fall. City and coalition partners recommended a new transitional housing program for Native Americans experiencing chronic homelessness.

By PATINA PARK

Published with permission from Pollen Midwest; originally published at pollenmidwest.org

Minneapolis is on Dakota Land in MniSotaMakoce (Land where the water reflects the sky) and is now home to many Native people from across the state and across the country. The water, trees, and all living things growing out of the ground carry with them the spirit of the original Dakota inhabitants because this ground is quite literally saturated with the DNA of our Indigenous ancestors. These ancestors lived here for millennium before Minneapolis even became a city. This land continues to be sacred land for many of the Urban Native population.

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Representative Karen Clark, Dist. 62A: 38 years! A job well done

MINNESOTA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Karen Clark, Phillips resident and Minnesota State Representative of District 62A since 1980 WILL retire from that elected office in January 2019.

By VERNON WETTERNACH
Alley Editor 1979-1980

“There is still much work to be done.”

She is known as a progressive fighter for equality, affordable housing, economic and social justice and as an unrelenting advocate for her low income constituents, communities of color, Native American and neighborhood concerns. Her advocacy, coalition building and ability to find innovative solutions are not only known in her district but also state-wide and nationally.

I am speaking of State Representative Karen Clark, District 62A, who announced this year that she is retiring from the state legislature at the end of 2018 after 38 years of service. Karen has consistently been re-elected over these years receiving 75 to 89% of the votes from her constituents.

Karen was born in an Oklahoma army hospital and raised in Rock County in southwestern Minnesota from the age of nine months. She attended Edgerton Public High School for 12 years, graduating in 1967 as valedictorian. Edgerton is a small rural community with a population of approximately 2,000 residents today. Her parents, Joseph and Mildred, were tenant farmers who eventually moved to the village of Kenneth, MN. They strongly encouraged education, hard work and community service for Karen and her three brothers and sister. Karen attended the College of St. Teresa in Winona, earning a B.S. degree in Nursing. She began her career as a public health nurse working in migrant worker camps in western MN and then on St. Paul’s West Side as a VISTA nurse-organizer who helped found what became “La Clinica.” Karen also became one of the first OB-GYN Nurse Practitioners at Hennepin County Hospital and then the Red Door Clinic. Later, during her legislative career, Karen was awarded a Bush Fellowship and earned her Master’s in Public Administration from the JFK School of Government at Harvard University.

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1977 UN Geneva Conference – Dick Bancroft: champion with a camera

DICK BANCROFT
These men photographed and documented by Dick Bancroft are a few of the many representatives attending the 1977 UN Geneva Conference. Left to right Ted Means, Greg Zephier, Russell Means, Oren R. Lyons, Jr., Larry Red Shirt, and Francis Andrew He Crow

First Declaration of International Indigenous Day

By LAURA WATERMAN WITTSTOCK

In the August issue of The Alley, I told readers the story of how Dick Bancroft loved cameras and picture taking since he was a young boy. Dick died at the age of 91 on July 16th. What I did not fully explain is that he spent years on his collection of photographs, much of it with Jaime Haire, his editor and archivist. Jaime worked diligently on the photographs that appeared in Dick’s book, We Are Still Here, published by the Minnesota Historical Society Press in 2013. Dick and I collaborated on the text and photos with pretty much him doing the photos and me doing the text. His photos are brilliant and clearly illustrative of the period 1970 to 1981 when the American Indian Movement was most active or influential.

Here are just a few of the photographs and quotes from the book so you can hear what Dick and I heard from the participants as they reflected on the times and events. The focus here is on the Geneva Conference of 1977.

In preparing for the book Dick said, “I wasn’t apprised of what occurred two years prior to that when the treaty council was formed in Wakpala. I didn’t know about that – I missed it. Why, I don’t know. But, in 1977, I was tipped off by the fact that they were going to go to Geneva. I said, “Who’s going to Geneva?” and they said, ‘The Treaty Council,’ and so I said, ‘What’s the treaty council?’ Pat [Bellanger] and others would tell me about it. I was going to be on that trip.”

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What’s Up at the Franklin Community Library – October 2018

All Ages

MNSpin Live Spotlight: Larry McDonough Quartet
Tues. Oct. 2, 10-11 am
Last Dec. HN Library launched MnSpin, an online music platform featuring a curated selection of music by local Minnesota artists. Hear one of those artists, the Larry McDonough Quartet, as they share their unique brand of jazz. With: Friends of Library. Funded: MN Arts & Cultural Heritage Fund.

Family Storytime
Fridays, 10:30-11 am
All ages & their caregivers. Talk, sing, read, write & play together.

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Phillips West – October 2018

Phillips West Neighborhood Events: www.phillipswest.info

By CRYSTAL WINDSCHITL

Thursday, October 4th, 6-7 pm
Phillips West Monthly Community Meeting!
Join your neighbors and other Community Partners for updates from Local City Government & Minneapolis Police. Meeting will take place at the Center for Changing Lives Building in Room 182 (2400 Park Avenue). Free parking is available in the rear of building off of Oakland Avenue. Free Jakeeno’s Pizza Dinner will be provided! If you would like more information or would like to get involved in the neighborhood please contact Crystal at 612-879-5383 or email her at pwno2005@yahoo.com

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Metro Transit New fareboxes for old

By JOHN CHARLES WILSON

The story of “Aladdin’s Lamp” contains the phrase, “New lamps for old!” Well, two of my bus-riding experiences last month make me think of “New fareboxes for old!”

The first one was on Route 10, Central Avenue Northeast. The bus had a new, very sophisticated farebox. There was even a smart card reader integrated with the farebox; however, it wasn’t in use. There was a regular Go-To Card reader by the front door, as usual. I have reason to believe this was an unannounced test and these new fareboxes may be in our future.

The second one was on Route 70, East Side of Saint Paul. It was one of the old buses from the 1980s, a type rarely seen anymore. It has the padded seats and the windows that actually opened so you could feel the breeze on your face, not just the vents up above your head. Of course it was a high-floor model, so you had to climb three steps to enter or exit. On the other hand, there were more seats than on modern buses, and there were actually seats close enough to the driver that you could actually have a conversation with him or her. As a transit fanatic, I loved the opportunity to talk to bus drivers about the industry. Unfortunately, that space on today’s low-floor buses is taken up by the wheel wells. This puts the kibosh on chit-chatting with drivers, but does provide a flat surface to place extra packages on. Change often both brings and takes away good things.

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Marie Sandvik Center – October 2018

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Hennepin County elections

Questions answered by candidates for County Commissioner & Sheriff

By JOHN CHARLES WILSON

With the help of my friends Lee Leichentritt and Peter Molenaar, and our editor Harvey Winje, I developed a questionnaire for candidates for Hennepin County Commissioner District 4 and Hennepin County Sheriff. Each candidate was asked to pick two topics from a menu of four or five, and explain how they intended to handle them if elected to office.

Topics for Commissioner Candidates:

  1. Housing for low income persons, senior citizens, and persons vulnerable due to mental illness.
  2. Public transportation in the Twin Cities metro area.
  3. Diversity in hiring Hennepin County employees.
  4. Mentally ill people being held in the County jail.

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Peace If Possible – Justice at any Rate!

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