NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Wednesday January 20th 2021

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Alley January 2021

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Library News

By CARZ NELSON 

For updated information on Hennepin County Library services during the Coronavirus Pandemic, visit www.hclib. org. All information is accurate as of December 15, 2020 

Franklin Library at 1413 E Franklin Avenue is open for computer use only. Call (612) 543-6925 to make an appointment. The building will remain locked, but staff will let you in at your appointment time. Masks are required and will be provided if you do not bring one. Because of social distancing, staff will be unable to offer computer assistance. You will have access to a desktop computer, Internet, and printing. You will need to bring your own headphones. At this time, Franklin Library is open for computer use ONLY. Other areas and services, including book/DVD checkout, are not available. They will be accepting returns during staffed service hours. 

Franklin Library Computer Hours 

Tuesday & Wednesday – 9 AM to 5 PM 

Thursday – Noon to 8 PM 

Friday & Saturday – 9 AM to 5 PM 

Sunday & Monday – Closed 

Grab and Go Library Service at Hosmer Library: Hosmer Library, 347 E 36th St., is open for retrieving holds, limited browsing of materials, checking out items, returning library materials, quick reference support, computer appointments and printing. Meeting rooms, study rooms, children’s play areas, and lounges will not be available for use at this time. Masks are required and will be provided if you don’t bring one. Check the library website for up-to-date service information and hours. 

Community Cookbook 

Community Cookbook is a monthly series of video cooking demonstrations from local chefs, restaurants, and organizations. Available on Facebook and YouTube, a new recipe is highlighted every month. January’s episode features a cooking demonstration by the chef of award-winning Vietnamese restaurant Pho Pasteur. Available starting Monday, January 18, 2021. 

Due Dates Extended 

Due dates for physical materials continue to be automatically extended. You are not required to return materials at this time. Libraries are accepting returns during staffed service hours only. Items will be removed from your account after a three-day quarantine. 

Outdoor Wi-Fi Available at Franklin and Hosmer Libraries 

Free Wi-Fi is available in the parking lots and grounds of several Hennepin County libraries, including Franklin and Hosmer. Library staff can help you find the best signal. 

Homework Help 

Live, virtual tutors are available through Help Now www. hclib.org/programs/homework-help. 

At Home Service 

At Home service is provided free of charge to Hennepin County residents who cannot get to a library due to illness, disability, or visual impairment. To apply for At Home service, submit an online application or apply by phone at 612-543-8850. Staff are available Monday through Friday, 10 AM to 5 PM, except holidays. 

Library social worker 

A social worker is available outside Franklin Library, Wednesdays 9am- 5pm: 

• Basic needs (clothing, food, meals, shelter) 

• Chemical Health 

• Disability Services 

• Education & Employment 

• Hennepin County Benefits 

• Housing 

• A listening ear 

• Mental Health Resources 

• Transportation 

E-BOOKS AND AUDIOBOOKS: 

LIBBY: The Libby app is available for iOS and Android devices and is a streamlined way to access downloadable ebooks and audiobooks from OverDrive. You can check out audiobooks right in the app. You can also read eBooks in the app or send them to your Kindle. 

CLOUD LIBRARY: Find downloadable eBooks for readers of all ages. A reader app is also available for Apple, Android and other devices. 

Online Services 

Go to the library without leaving home. Here are just a few of the services available at www.hclib.org: 

Tools for job searches 

Ancestry Library Edition and other resources to research family history 

Local music on MNspin 

Ask the Library: Have a reference or library account question? Call, text, chat with, or email a library worker. 

https://www.hclib.org/ contact 

Call 612-543-KNOW (5669) to reach library staff by phone. 

MONDAY-THURSDAY 9 a.m. – 9 p.m. 

FRIDAY-SATURDAY 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. 

SUNDAY Noon –5 p.m. 

ESPAÑOL/SPANISH: Llame o envíe un texto al 651-503-8013 para recibir ayuda en español. 

HMOOB/HMONG: Hu losis text rau lub tsev nyeem ntawv ntawm 612-385-0886 txais kev pab hais lus Hmoob. 

SOOMAALI/SOMALI: Caawimaad Soomaali ah, soo wac ama qoraal (text) usoo dir maktabada 612-235-1339. 

Carz is a Phillips resident and an enthusiastic patron of Hennepin County Library. 

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Alley Cooks

CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING TRADITION OF BLUEBERRY SOUP: COURTESY THE AMERICAN SWEDISH INSTITUTE 

Prep and cooking time 20 min. Serves 4 

750g / 1lb 10oz / 5 cups blueberries fresh or frozen 
80g / 3oz / 1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon of sugar plus extra to taste 
2 tablespoon potato starch 

-Place berries in a large pot with the sugar and pour in 3 cups of water (750ml / 25fl oz). 
-Bring to a simmer over medium heat and cook for 5 minutes. 
-In a small bowl, mix the potato starch with a couple of tablespoons of cold water, then stir it into the soup. 
-Return to the boil and cook until it thickens, then taste and adjust the sweetness to your liking with a little sugar. 

Enjoy! 

VASALOPPET & BLUEBERRY SOUP (blåbärssoppa) 

The American Swedish Institute (ASI) is proud to keep traditions alive by honoring the history of skiing and its connection with blueberry soup! Cross country skiing is an ancient mode of transport in the Nordic region and the Vasaloppet (Swedish for “Vasa Race”) has become the world’s oldest and largest cross country ski race. Its history encompasses everything from bloodbaths to friendship and heroic deeds! The Vasaloppet’s roots extend back to 1521 when the Danish King Christian II ruled the Kalmar Union of Sweden, Norway and Denmark. Gustav Eriksson Vasa, the 24-year-old future King of Sweden, fled on skis from Mora towards Norway to escape Danish oppression and urge rebellion after his father, brother and 80 others were beheaded. He led the battle to a free Sweden and was elected King. Contemporary interest in skiing was linked in 1922 to Vasa’s flight, launching the Vasaloppet race. 

Now during the race, each participant is offered refreshments including the legendary blueberry soup (blåbärssoppa) which has been served since 1958. During Vasaloppet week, approximately 50,000 litres of blueberry soup are served. While blueberry soup isn’t on the menu every day, there is a daily soup special and there are plenty of other menu items to fit your taste. When we resume operations, we invite you to visit ASI and to dine at FIKA located at 2600 Park Avenue in Minneapolis, ASImn. org. Tack så mycket! 

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METRO TRANSIT: Answer the Survey, We’re Counting on You

By JOHN CHARLES WILSON 

Public transit is one of the few government functions where the people in charge actually listen to suggestions from common citizens. I have been going to public forums about transit changes for many years, though recently I’ve had trouble getting to them. However, because of the pandemic a lot of this stuff is being done online now. 

Metro Transit is currently doing a survey which can be accessed at https://www. surveymonkey.com/r/futurebus or from the Metro Transit website regarding future Bus Rapid Transit routes. 

As you probably already know, two BRT routes already exist, the A on Snelling (Saint Paul) and the C on Penn Ave. N., and three more are “in the pipeline”: the B (Lake St.), the D (Chicago Ave. – Fremont Ave. N.) and the E (Hennepin – France Ave. S.) 

This survey is about what three routes will next get the BRT treatment after the ones already planned. You are being asked to pick three of four choices and rank them in order of importance to you: Central (Minneapolis), Como/ Maryland (Saint Paul), Lyndale S./Johnson, and Rice/ Robert (Saint Paul). While none of these routes would directly pass through the Phillips neighborhood, the value of a transit system is where it enables you to go. So please think about what areas outside Phillips you have reason to visit, whether daily or just occasionally, and “vote” for BRT to those places in this survey. 

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Financial Concerns After Death

By MARY ELLEN KALUZA 

Death is a tough topic. We fear it for ourselves and we fear it for those we love. On top of the grief, it is a lot of work to lose someone close to you. This blog is meant to help you get started with some of the important tasks around the departed’s finances that will make things much easier if attended to soon after the death. 

Get the Death Certificate 

Typically the funeral home supplies the death certificate. You can request several copies from the funeral home—you’ll need them. They are generally less expensive at this time, and will save you trips to the county vital records office for additional copies. Five to ten copies is not excessive, especially if there is property to be sold. 

Contact the Social Security Administration 

Even if the deceased was not receiving benefits, you want to notify them.. Call the SSA at 1-800-772-1213. (The funeral home may contact them for you.) Do this for a few reasons: 

Survivors may be eligible for benefits 

Prevent identity theft (yes, stealing the identity of the dead is a thing) 

Learn if you must return any payments received (payments received for the month of death may have to be returned to Social Security) 

Notify Financial Institutions and Creditors 

Hopefully, your loved one left financial records in good order and it will be easy to track down where money is and where money is owed. 

If there are Payable-on- Death beneficiaries on the accounts they can claim the money immediately with a death certificate. 

Creditors will close accounts to prevent unauthorized use. 

Report the Death to the Credit Bureaus 

Identity thieves do watch obituaries. Sadly, family members may even seize the opportunity. Send a letter and copy of the death certificate (originals usually not necessary) to one credit bureau – they will contact the other two. It is worth the extra cost to send certified mail. 

Equifax, P.O. Box 105139, Atlanta, GA 30348-5139 

Experian, P.O. Box 4500, Allen, TX 75013 

TransUnion, P.O. Box 2000, Chester, PA 19016 

Order Credit Reports 

This is a useful way to identify all debts. Send a letter along with the following information about the deceased: 

Legal name 

Social Security Number 

Date of birth 

Date of death 

Last known address 

A copy of the death certificate or letters testamentary 

Mail the request and information to each of the three of the credit reporting companies listed above. Include your name and address. 

Change Mailing Address (if the deceased lived alone) 

You’ll need valid proof that you are the appointed executor or administrator and authorized to manage the deceased person’s mail. 

Complete a change of address form at a Post Office location. 

Have someone bring in the mail until the address change is in effect. Piled up mail alerts thieves that a home is not occupied. 

Stop advertising mail by registering on the Direct Marketing Association “Deceased Do Not Contact” list at DMA. org. 

Set Up a Filing System 

You will thank yourself for this. Keep: 

Death certificates 

Copies of all correspondence 

Detailed notes of all phone calls, etc. 

Receipts for all expenses including the funeral, documents, mailing, etc. 

Medical bills for the deceased 

Other debts 

Tax returns 

And more, depending on the complexity of the estate 

Don’t Rush to Divvy up Money Left by the Deceased or Pay Their Debts 

States have a hierarchy of debts to be paid by the estate of a deceased person. This includes possibly repaying the state for medical assistance received. Know the laws of your state first, or survivors may be held responsible. Seek legal advice. 

Take care of yourself 

Most of us will be faced with losing a loved one. It is hard on so many fronts. Having a starting point in dealing with the finances can help. If you find yourself in this position, I wish you comfort and peace. 

Author Mary Ellen Kaluza is a Certified Financial Counselor with LSS Financial Counseling. A version of this blog first appeared in Sense & Centsibility blog page. 

LSS Financial Counseling offers free counseling for budgeting, debt, student loans, foreclosure prevention, credit report reviews, and much more. 

Phone: 888-577-2227 Website: www.lssfinancialcounseling.org 

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Returning Chapter 6

Unknown 

By PATRICK CABELLO HANSEL 

Luz yelled at Angel, “How could you forget to pick up our daughter?!” 

Angel yelled at Luz, “I thought it was your turn! I worked a double shift yesterday.” 

Luz, “How could you do this?” 

Angel, “I didn’t DO anything!” 

Their shouting woke up Angelito from his nap. 

“Mami, papito, why are you shouting at each other?” he asked, bursting into tears. 

Angel went to comfort his son; Luz called the daycare. It went to voicemail. She called the director’s cell phone. Same. She called a friend, a mother of another child in the program, and no answer there either. 

There comes a point when the profound terror of a lost child bursts past shock, anger and blaming, and settles into desperation. Alone, that can lead a parent to either paralysis or futile violence. Fortunately, Luz and Angel were able to put their blame mechanism aside and comfort each other. They began to think the same. Angel passed Angelito to his wife, who went for his coat, while Angel put on his shoes and coat. Each of them reminded each other to bring their phones and keys. 

Mi Familia Day Care was a few short blocks from their apartment. The slush had begun to freeze, so there were a few slips and near-falls on the way. Angelito kept asking where they were going, and Angel and Luz both told him they were just going to get his sister. 

In their rational minds, they didn’t expect to see anyone at the daycare, but the part of them that hopes was guiding their steps and moving their eyes and legs. When they arrived, there was only the security light on above the door. Luz rang the bell several times, and pounded on the glass door. Angel peered in—by the thin, red light of the emergency exit signs, he couldn’t tell if anything was out of place. It took them a minute to realize that there was a handwritten note taped to the door. It looked like it had been ripped from a notebook. 

“What’s it say,” Angel asked. Luz read it out loud: 

Don’t worry. 

We have your light blessing. 

You will know where she is. 

“What?!” Angel asked. He took the paper from Luz and read it again. 

“We have your light blessing?” he shouted. “What the hell does that mean?” 

“And how ‘will we know where she is’?” Luz cried. “Oh Angel, somebody took our baby!” 

They did not notice that when they tore the note off the door, the left a piece hanging there. They didn’t pay attention to the marks on the bottom of the page they held in their hands: two small open arrows ^ ^ pointing up, and a vertical straight line next to it. Had they seen those markings and had they matched them to the markings on the scrap left on the door, they would have seen the initials M L written there. Had they done so, they might have realized that their dear Lupita was safe, and that the mysterious M L was someone they could trust. But in their terror, they could not see. 

A fierce wind blew around the corner of Lake Street and blew the paper out of Angel’s hand. He dashed into the street after it, almost getting hit by a dark colored van with tinted windows. The driver honked and the passengers shouted, but Angel was only thinking about preserving the only clue they had. 

Luz, on the other hand, saw the van, saw it had no license plate on either the front or back, and heard the voice. A second fierce wind blew through her; not from the storm that was starting outside, but from the storm that had been hidden inside her for a long time. 

To be continued… 

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What’s Cookin?

Everyone has been cooking more than ever with COVID-19 closing restaurants and keeping us shut in. No doubt we all have come up with a delicious new dish, made one better, or returned to old favorites. 

Let’s spread the love by sharing our favorite dishes. Send your recipes to copydesk@alleynews.org with the story behind it. A picture of you and/ or your creation will only make it more delicious! 

Some 38 years ago these recipes appeared in The Alley Newspaper. 

This worn, torn beloved recipe submitted by Mary Ellen Kaluza. She noted, “I’ve made the Impossible Green Bean Pie countless times since. Thank you, Lois Parker!”

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Random Alley News

-All My Relations Arts has announced their We Are Still Here cohort. We Are Still Here is an 18-24 month partnership with the Hennepin Theatre Trust that will bring large-scale, high profile public artwork created by an emerging network of Native artists to both downtown Minneapolis and the American Indian Corridor highlighting contemporary Native culture and dispelling stereotypes. Artist Mentor Jonathan Thunder (Red Lake Ojibwe) will work with cohort artists Ray Janis (Oglala Lakota Tribe), Sheldon Starr (Oglala Sioux Tribe), and Missy Whiteman (Northern Arapaho and Kickapoo) to create digital designs, full-motion animation projects and a possible large-scale mural. 

-The Uncles are moving out. After 36 years at 28th and Chicago, Uncle Hugo’s Science Fiction Bookstore and Uncle Edgar’s Mystery Bookstore are looking for a new home. The building was destroyed by fire during the unrest after the murder of George Floyd, and the owner has decided not to rebuild at the same location. We hope they don’t move too far away! 

-Phillips Neighborhood Clinic has reopened! Clinic hours are Mondays, 6PM-8PM (check in starts at 5:30PM) at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 2742 15th Avenue South. Please enter from the side door on the East side of the building (along 15th Ave S). No appointments or insurance necessary. Spanish interpreters are available at all times. The Phillips Neighborhood Clinic (PNC) is a free clinic operated by University of Minnesota health professional students. All students are supervised by licensed clinicians. Phone: 612-724- 1690 

-Janis Lane-Ewert is the new station manager of KRSM Radio, 98.9 FM, which operates out of Waite House at the Phillips Community Center at 2323 11th Avenue South. Lane-Ewert was Executive Director of KFAI Fresh Air Community Radio for 12 years, and was most recently Development Officer at jazz station KBEM – Jazz88. KRSM, an initiative of Pillsbury United Communities, is a platform for amplifying the voices, stories, cultures, and conversations happening in our neighborhood, with a focus on communities that are marginalized, misrepresented, and erased by traditional media. 

-Peace House Community welcomes Loaves and Fishes. Beginning January 4, 2021, Peace House Community at 1816 Portland Ave will be a new serving site for Loaves and Fishes meals. Meals at Peace House Community will be served Monday through Friday, 5:30PM until 6:30PM. St. Stephen’s at 2123 Clinton Ave S will no longer be serving meals. Other Loaves and Fishes locations near the Phillips neighborhood will not change. During COVID-19, all meals are takeaway only. Loaves and Fishes is always looking for volunteers to help cook and serve meals! Loaves and Fishes provides free meals at locations throughout Minneapolis. To volunteer, visit their website www.loavesandfishesmn.org or email their Director of Volunteers, Lonny Evans at levans@loaveandfishesmn. org 

-Ward 9 Council Member Alondra Cano has announced she will not be running for re-election in 2021. Ward 9 includes East Phillips and Midtown Phillips, as well as parts of the Powderhorn, Central, Corcoran, and Longfellow neighborhoods. A controversial figure during her tenure, Cano has been criticized for doxing constituents, freezing out journalists, not supporting East Phillips neighbors in their fight against the City’s public works expansion at the Roof Depot, and flip-flopping on police defunding. Cano was first elected in 2013. To the best of our knowledge so far, Rita Ortega has announced her candidacy to serve Ward 9. Ortega is a community organizer, Little Earth resident, and former Cano policy aide who ran unsuccessfully to fill MN House seat 62A in 2018. 

-Iglesia Apostolica De La Fe En Cristo Jesus at 1534 East 24th St. has put new siding on the church. The building is now greyish-blue in color. The update looks good from the street and has won the approval of the immediate neighbors. 

-From Dave Moore: I’m having a hard time downsizing, like barely at all, but wish to let go of my file copies of past alley issues. I have what looks like a complete run from 1987 to present, and just recycling them seems a waste. Anybody want them? 

Soup for You Cafe serves lunch from Noon to 1 p.m. Monday through Friday. Diners pay whatever they feel is a fair price — or whatever they are able. (Or no fee, as may be the case.) Due to COVID, diners will receive a healthy bag lunch to take away. Sometimes groceries (fresh and non-perishable) and toiletries are available as well. Diners of all income are welcome. Masks are required.2511 East Franklin Avenue, (Bethany Lutheran Church Building.) https:// www.facebook.com/justoneguymakingsoup 

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Midtown Phillips new year meetings and a letter

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Saving the Roof Depot

By EAST PHILLIPS NEIGHBORHOOD INSTITUTE 

The East Phillips Neighborhood Institute — through investor Agro Fund One, Ltd. — has offered to purchase the historic former Roof Depot building. Agro Fund One hopes to participate in East Phillips residents’ own idea: turn the huge former Roof Depot warehouse building into the East Phillips Indoor Urban Farm. This indoor farm would be a community-based aquaponic urban farm facility, with a farmer’s market, community kitchen, cafe and coffee shop, and other entrepreneurial spaces to be owned and operated by neighborhood residents. Jobs and job-training would help provide living wage and second-chance jobs with a priority for local community residents. However, if the City is allowed to go forward with its plan, the huge former warehouse building at the intersection of East 28th Street and Hiawatha Avenue, would be demolished and replaced with Minneapolis’ proposed Hiawatha Campus Expansion Project — a centralized storage and maintenance facility for their Public Works Department with all its equipment and vehicles. 

The City’s plan would add greatly to the environmental injustices faced historically and currently by the East Phillips neighborhood. This neighborhood is one of the most diverse areas in Minneapolis and is home to the Little Earth of United Tribes community — one of the only Native American-preference housing complexes in the country. The Roof Depot is located on an arsenic Superfund site, and its demolition would expose neighborhood residents to more highly toxic arsenic-contaminated materials. 

The Hiawatha Campus Expansion Project — in which the City of Minneapolis hopes to expand its storage for water and sewer maintenance facilities — would also bring two 12,000-gallon oil tanks and 102 pieces of diesel equipment into this neighborhood. An asphalt heating facility and a 400 car employee parking ramp has also been part of their revealed plan. The City’s project would dramatically increase toxic air pollution from more traffic congestion in the area and exacerbate existing pollution-related health issues in the community, including asthma and cardiovascular disease — additionally magnifying COVID’s disproportionate impact. 

EPNI has sued the City of Minneapolis in an attempt to stop the project, and is using other avenues to ensure the City’s project is halted.

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