NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Thursday October 2nd 2014

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October 2014 Alley Newspaper

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IV Annual Bridging Festival & Shenanigrins IV

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This is where we live!

VenturaVillageNewsOctober2014Issuecopy

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No Flu cases Sept ‘18, 400 Daily Oct ’18

Foreman Percy Gould & dog perhaps at Rosenquist  Co.,  1008 E. Franklin Ave.

Foreman Percy Gould & dog perhaps at Rosenquist Co., 1008 E. Franklin Ave.

By Sue Hunter Weir

Percy and Nellie (Carlson) Gould amongst 199 deaths in 3 months

On September 19, 1918, Dr. H. M. Guilford, Minneapolis’ City Health Commissioner, declared that the Spanish Influenza epidemic “does not exist in Minneapolis and never has.” That didn’t mean that he didn’t expect it to appear. He warned that it would probably reach the city later in the fall. One week later, on September 26, 1918, the Minneapolis Tribune reported the first case of influenza in Minnesota. Four days later, there were 150 reported cases in Minneapolis alone. By mid-October over 400 new cases were being reported in the city every day.

The early cases involved soldiers or military men in training. Soldiers were hospitalized at Fort Snelling while the men who were in training on the University Campus went to the University Hospital and those from the naval training program at Dunwoody were quarantined in the West Hotel. Men who had finished their training and were prepared to move to other military camps around the country had nowhere to go—influenza had spread to 43 of the 48 states and military hospitals were overflowing with sick and dying soldiers.

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Who’s Who at the Franklin Library

Albert Einstein tells us that “the only thing that you absolutely need to know, is the location of the library.” That’s easy; our Library is at 1314 East Franklin Avenue since 1914. Twenty-four years previous it was within the A.J.Bernier Building-17th and East Franklin Avenue.

Albert Einstein tells us that “the only thing that you absolutely need to know, is the location of the library.” That’s easy; our Library is at 1314 East Franklin Avenue since 1914. Twenty-four years previous it was within the A.J.Bernier Building-17th and East Franklin Avenue.

Newly arrived, Cassie Warholm-Wohlenhaus, delves into service and archives

Cassie Warholm-Wohlenhaus

Cassie Warholm-Wohlenhaus

By Erin Thomasson

“This is your library,” says Cassie Warholm-Wohlenhaus, “and we’re here to serve you, the community.” Cassie is Franklin Community Library’s newest librarian, having joined the staff in March of this year. She is passionate about Franklin Library and the community it serves – young and old, Native and non-Native, immigrant and long-time resident alike.

“Franklin was my top choice of libraries to work in,” explains Cassie. “It’s a well-used library, with a collection of books and other materials in languages relevant to the local people, including Somali, Oromo, Spanish and Arabic.” She especially appreciates the Library’s location in the midst of the Native American community. Cassie recently attended a back-to-school resource fair at Little Earth of United Tribes to promote library services, and would like to see more programs and partnerships with both the Native and Somali communities.

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Twin Cities high school students departing to attend the People’s Climate March on Sunday, Sept. 21, 2014

Ten high school students, 5 of them from South High, joined 6 bus loads of Minnesotans to be part of this country’s largest climate march ever held in this country.  The students were part of Act! MN, a project coordinated by the Will Steger Foundation.  The Foundation provided a staff person to support their efforts and attend the March with them.  The students were part of the very well attended 80 block-long March where it is estimated that over 400,000 people gathered in NYC bringing the total to well over 675,000 around the world for this significant, history making moment.  Hats off to these students!

Ten high school students, 5 of them from South High, joined 6 bus loads of Minnesotans to be part of this country’s largest climate march ever held in this country. The students were part of Act! MN, a project coordinated by the Will Steger Foundation. The Foundation provided a staff person to support their efforts and attend the March with them. The students were part of the very well attended 80 block-long March where it is estimated that over 400,000 people gathered in NYC bringing the total to well over 675,000 around the world for this significant, history making moment. Hats off to these students!

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Ingebretsen’s Fall Events Encompass the Traditional to the Trending

Drinking horns, aquavit, lutefisk (pictured below), Runestone history, , bees, wax and soy candles

By Carstens Smith

October 4 to 11 is Sale Week for Ingebretsen’s, an event that kicks off a series of talks, presentations, and demonstrations that celebrate both beloved traditions and emerging trends.

The art of the Viking era lives on with metalsmith Frank Vinson and his son, Spirit. The Vinsons make drinking horns and knives, intricately decorated with Viking-age designs. Spirit will speak on the history of drinking horns and the process of making one on Saturday, October 4 at 1:30. Both Vinsons will be at the store all day to speak with people individually about their handcrafted items.

Food traditionalists will enjoy a talk by Chris Dorff, the president of Olsen Fish Company, the world’s largest lutefisk company. Chris will explain how lutefisk became associated with Christmas dinners, how it is processed, and the best was to prepare it. Olsen Fish Company also processes several flavors of pickled herring, which are carried by Ingebretsen’s. Samples will be available. Chris will be at the store on Friday, October 10 at 1 pm. (Please call the store for reservations, 612.729.9333. The event is free, but we want to be sure to have a seat for you.)

One way to perk up a lagging conversation is to toss in a mention of the Kensington Runestone. Father and daughter researchers, Robert G. Johnson and Janey Westin have written The Last Kings of Norse America, Runestone Keys to a Lost Empire. They will speak about their research on an expedition sent to North America, decreed in 1354 by King Magnus of Norway and Sweden in an attempt to restore the lost fur and goods trade. Keys to this research are the author’s complete and rigorous translations of the Kensington and Spirit Pond runestones. Their conclusions will give you new arguments about an old, but favorite, topic. The authors will be at Ingebretsen’s on Thursday, October 9 at 2 p.m. Read the rest of this entry »

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October 2014 Spirit of Phillips

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Warblers of the World

By Peter Molenaar

Flitting about within the fronds of my garden’s crimson red okra, so tiny it was. Soft grays of wing, green and gold of body, its rapid head/eye movement processed a world far beyond the realm of my own slow wit. Most precious gift… Come back!

Members of the Audubon society have met at the East Lake Library. They are planning a street demonstration to demand bird-safe glass at the new Vikings Stadium. SAVE THE BIRDS – SAVE THE PEOPLE – SAVE OUR PLANET!

A bird of similar feather was V.I. Lenin. He wrote an article in 1912 condemning a German firm which specialized in providing strike breakers, i.e., criminal hooligans. This firm was owned by one Ludwig Koch. Curious?

Meanwhile, an ISIL has been spotted. Truthfully, an ISIL is not some type of bird, but rather it is another “monster of our own making.”

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Frank Reflections: “…be taxed on what you burn, not on what you earn.”

By Frank Erickson

This is puzzling–liberals who believe climate change is real, have the same energy consuming lifestyles as climate change deniers; what good is a belief if you do not act on it?

Based on actions alone, how could you tell the difference between a liberal Democrat who believes climate change is real and a climate change denier–let’s see, they both drive their cars all over the place, fly in airplanes, have air conditioning, nothing sucks more power (check your electric bill) from the power plants than air conditioning. And power plants are the number one cause of climate change. Automobiles are number two.

A Democrat will say, “climate change is just terrible,” yes, it is, and so are you because you are that climate change.

Well, I’ve just gone beyond being a blowhard. I’ll let Al Gore get the last word…I think. “You should be taxed on what you burn, not what you earn.” Oh! Oh! So profound, that would really help clean things up, tax the hell out of what we burn, that’ll make us all think twice before cranking up the a/c or driving to Yellowstone. Believing climate change is real is not enough.

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