NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Wednesday July 27th 2016

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July 2016 Alley Newspaper

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Art Pollinators engage neighbors:creating art, connecting across barriers, increasing safety, and embellishing beauty

by Patrick Cabello Hansel

How can we make our community safer and more beautiful?  How does art build connections across barriers of language and culture?  What are the key issues facing Phillips?

These are some of the questions that young artists with St. Paul’s Lutheran’s Semilla Center for Healing and the Arts will be asking this summer.  They will be interviewing residents and decision-makers in Midtown Phillips about how they see their community and environment, and how they interact with their community and environment.

These youth artists will be serving as “art pollinators”, engaging neighbors in creating art for their neighborhood.  From mosaics on planters and garbage cans, to photo exhibits to the 3rd issue of The Phoenix of Phillips.

Are you interested in being a pollinator of the arts? For more information, e-mail stpaulscreate@gmail.com, call 612-724-3862, or come to St. Paul’s Block Party (2700 block of 15th Avenue) on July 23 from 10 am to 2pm.

And remember: we are still receiving submissions for the next issue of “The Phoenix of Phillips”.  We welcome children, youth, adults and seniors of any writing level to submit their poems or essays to stpaulscreate@gmail.com, or mail them to 2742 15th Ave S.  Minneapolis, MN, 55407.

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Phillips West Neighborhood Upcoming Events-July 2016

July 7th (Thursday) 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. – Phillips West Monthly Community Meeting (Note No July Meeting due to proximity to 4th of July Holiday)

August 2nd (Tuesday) 5:00 to 8:00 p.m.

Phillips West Neighborhood 20th Annual National Night Out Celebration!

Please join hundreds of Community Partners & Residents for the biggest National Night Out Celebration in Minneapolis!  EVENT AND EVERYTHING AT IT IS FREE FOR THE PUBLIC!!!!! Event will be held along 27th Street between Columbus and Portland Avenues!  A variety of FREE Picnic Food including Snow Cones, Popcorn, Hot Dogs, Watermelon, Cookies & Ice Cream!  There will also be a variety of Entertainment including a Mariachi Band, Dancing Contest,  Open Mic Rap Contest with opportunity to win Grand Prizes, Salsa Dancers, 3 Clowns, 2 Bounce Houses, a Puppet show, Face painters, Fish Pond, Children’s Games, McGruff the Crime Dog, twinkle the Mascot, Mickey Mouse, and a Giant Inflated Slide! Information on dozens of Community Resources will be available!  If you would like an information table or would like to get involved contact Crystal at 612-879-5383 or email pwno2005@yahoo.com

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The count of Union and Confederate Civil War Veterans remains challenging

Handwriting idiosyncrasies and paper folds led to misreading of application ordering a tombstone for James Parker as a Civil War Union Veteran when burial was of Jonas Parker who was not a Veteran.

Part I: One Union Veteran Lost but Another Gained Two New Confederate Veterans

By TIMOTHY McCALL, Guest Writer

All right, so we didn’t actually “lose” a Civil War Veteran–as it turns out, he never was one.  Let me explain.   In the early 1930s -1940s, a concerted effort was made to identify and acquire markers for all of the Veterans buried in the cemetery.  The effort was probably led by Albert Nelson, the cemetery’s caretaker.  Researching the cemetery’s occupants’ history and genealogy in the early-mid 20th century must have been a herculean task considering that the availability of information was limited to printed material, telephone calls and writing letters to known genealogical sources, i.e., libraries and historical societies.

It was in early 1932, that an application was filed with the War Department to have a headstone made and shipped to Pionee rs and Soldiers Cemetery for one James Parker, who had served in Company A, 1st Minnesota Cavalry.  Most likely due to the handwriting of Health Officer Thomas F. Quimby and an inconvenient crease running through the deceased’s name on his burial permit, the gentleman’s name appears to be James, but is actually Jonas.  Jonas B. Parker was born in Nova Scotia, Canada about 1812.  He arrived in the U.S. sometime after 1871 and was living in Gates, Monroe County, New York, with his son and daughter-in-law in 1880.  His occupation is listed as “Shoe Maker”.  Why he came to Minnesota is anybody’s guess, but it’s most likely that he came with one of his children.  Jonas B. Parker died on December 28, 1884 at the age of 73 years, cause of death was “Senile Debility”.  His grave is located in Lot 37, Block G and is marked by a white marble, Union military marker with the name James Parker.

Our two recently identified  Civil War Veterans are; Nathan W. Dutiel, who served in Company F, 8th Illinois Infantry and Isaac Breathed, who is our second confirmed Confederate Veteran. He served in Company A, 43rd Battalion, Virginia Cavalry, also known as Mosby’s Rangers. Read the rest of this entry »

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Honoring Veterans and enjoying Buster Keaton at premiere venue

BY SUE HUNTER WEIR

The weather was a mixed bag for Memorial Day weekend.  Rain—more precisely the threat of thunderstorms—meant that we had to reschedule our screening of Buster Keaton’s silent film, The Cameraman, from May 28th until the following weekend.

Earlier in the day, though, the weather cooperated and Scouts from Troop 1 helped with our annual planting.  They did more than help—they did it.  There are about two dozen urns that need planting and several small flowerbeds that need to be tidied up and to be filled in with some colorful spring flowers.  They did a spectacular job and we celebrated with pizza.

On Sunday Scouts from Troop 82 put flags on the graves of all of our Veterans and along the roadway.   The flags are a gift from American Legion Post #1, our Memorial Day partners.

The weather for our 148th Memorial Day observance was glorious which may be why the crowd was somewhat bigger than in other recent years.  The observance at Pioneers and Soldiers is special because it is such a community effort.  The Scouts, the American Legion Post, students from the Minnesota Transition School, and the Seward Community Concert Band all come together to make this event happen. Read the rest of this entry »

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EPIC Report-July 2016

EPICAlleyReportforJuly2016Final

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Midtown Phillips Neighborhood Association News July 2016

4.10-v41#7-MPNAI

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In the Heart of the Beast Theatre Company Talks With Community About Its Future and “Home”

5.10b v41#7 HOBT photo

BY LINDSEY FENNER

“This is the place”

The sparkling Kasota stone façade catches the hot summer sun, reflecting back the colorful buildings nearby: mint-green; peach-pink; and the green, red, and yellow traffic lights of this busy and vibrant stretch of South Minneapolis. A mural meets the stone at the round white and black striped marquee, accented with strips of neon color, at the corner of 15th Avenue South and Lake Street. The marquee is a landmark on a bustling street, an Art Deco vision of the future, a tower of human light reaching to the sky.

Inside, the lobby is a cool respite from the heat. The building is quiet, between the busy MayDay build, and the fall and winter stage shows. The green-trimmed doorways are framed with a Pete Seeger quote. A long table along the length of the lobby is bare, except for a paper-mache blue jay head and a pair of hands, each much larger than life. At one end of the lobby is a shrine and thank you for the gift of water: a humble water fountain, set in a niche of swirling blue glass mosaic, and a mural of the connections and the life that come from water. Another mural decorates the north wall of the lobby, rays of life joining at a yellow sphere. The center of the sphere reads, “This is the place.”  This is the Avalon Theater, the place where In the Heart of the Beast Puppet and Mask Theatre has made its home since 1988.

Read the rest of this entry »

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In the Heart of the Beast Theatre Company Talks With Community About Its Future and “Home”

BY CORRIE ZOLL

Over the past winter, HOBT decided that it was time to start a conversation with our community about the future of our organization and our home in the Avalon Theater. We appreciate that The Alley is here to help us have that discussion.

The discussion is not new. The Avalon was a distressed building three decades ago when the community worked together to make the building into a home for HOBT.  Now the building is 30 years older, and needs a level of care and investment that HOBT has been unable to provide. As the building continues to age, an inability to meet its increasing needs could threaten the ongoing existence of the building, of the organization, or both.

Though the issue is serious, we do not consider it to be a crisis.  HOBT estimates that we have two to five years to work toward a long-term solution. We have time to make a decision that best serves the many communities that will be affected by it.  More than a year ago, the HOBT board began to explore various scenarios.  The possibilities were divided into two groups: “Stay” scenarios in which HOBT invests in continuing our time in the Avalon Theater, and “Go” scenarios in which we find another home.  We learned a lot over that time, and we have more to learn. Many scenarios are possible. The direction we take will affect our organization, our neighborhood, and our beloved Avalon Theater.

Read the rest of this entry »

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To be puppeteers in the Heart of the Beast…

BY STEVEN LINSNER

Poet, writer, performer, painter, musician and videographer; 1952-2005

To be puppeteers in the Heart of the Beast…

…is to find ourselves in the great world Beast made of families, races, ages, sexes, classes, corporations and nations, people, (and creatures!) all different, working out a way to live together.

…is to work puppets. To hold life in our hands, to sense how we are all like puppets—worked by instincts, voices, and forces above us and below us.

…is to carry and protect something very old like a heart within us, a secret, a promise. Like carrying a flickering candle through a dark place. Like carrying a family in a horse-drawn wagon.

…is to travel the roads of history and loss, in search of something like a new heart: new communities, new families, new work, new holidays.

…is to tell the story of people who live in the heart of the beast—as courageous and resourceful as they really are.

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