NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Sunday July 21st 2019

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Alley July 2019

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Holmes asks: Will you make a phone call?

By Tesha M. Christensen

At 14, Trinidad Flores was diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy, a condition in which an enlarged heart struggles to pump blood. His mom, Little Earth’s Cassandra Holmes, watched him endure three surgeries and a failed heart transplant before he died in 2013 at age 16.

Now she’s leading a charge to decrease the pollution in South Minneapolis. 

She doesn’t want to see any more neighborhood babies born in need of breathing tubes, or young people who’ve succumbed to asthma and diabetes. 

During a community meeting about the Roof Depot site off Hiawatha and 28th St. on June 17, 2019 at the East Phillips Recreation and Cultural Center, Holmes walked through the crowd holding up maps that show how many kids in the neighborhood have been treated for lead poisoning, how many have visited the emergency room because of asthma attacks, and how many have dealt with arsenic poisoning.

For every 10,000 people, over 200 are hospitalized because of asthma, blood lead and arsenic in this area. 

Of the 7,000 children who live in Phillips, about 40% live in poverty and 80% fall into various ethnic groups. 

Photo by TESHA M. CHRISTENSEN
Abah Mohamad (right) is baffled about why the city isn’t supporting the urban farm plan. “It has everything the community needs,” Mohamed pointed out, speaking on behalf of herself and three other women from her community. “It is exactly what will serve the neighborhood.”

“This meeting is an active meeting,” she announced. Holmes asked community members to take out their phones, and engage in grassroots organizing by calling the mayor and their city council members one by one, and asking them to support the East Phillips Indoor Urban Farm.

“We are tired of them not listening to us and putting all their garbage on us,” Holmes stated. “We have to start somewhere and this is it.”

They took out their phones

Twenty-nine-year-old Margarita Ortega took out her phone. “I know what it’s like to grow up in pollution, and grow up with asthma and breathing problems,” Ortega said. “I have two children going through it, as well.” 

The Little Earth resident also knows what it is like to struggle to find green food, and is excited by the idea of an indoor urban farm that uses aquaponics within a few blocks of her house, one that is powered by an immense solar installation on the roof, and provides affordable housing and jobs.

Ortega shook her head when talking about city staff and council members. “They’re just worried about money and power,” she said.

Adam Fairbanks doesn’t live in South Minneapolis anymore, but his family still does. He took out his phone, too, and started calling city council members. He works with Red Lake and helped meet the needs of residents at the Wall of Forgotten Natives last year where he saw the large number of nebulizers and inhalers prescribed to those who were there. He blames the smog and pollution in Phillips for the health problems residents have. 

Photo by TESHA M. CHRISTENSEN
Phillips resident Cassandra Holmes stated, “We want to live a long life, and we don’t want any more trucks in our community.”

“I’m amazed that the city has not supported this project,” Fairbanks said.

“They don’t listen,” agreed Cindi Sutter, who has dreams of living at a revitalized Roof Depot and having access to garden plots and solar energy.

Lifelong Phillips resident Gabriel Pass pointed out that neighboring communities such as Seward, Longfellow and Corcoran will also be affected by this new pollution, and already are experiencing effects from the current levels. While biking along the Midtown Greenway earlier that day, he observed how the air smelled bad east of the Sabo Bridge.

Abah Mohamad had her phone out, too. She’s also baffled about why the city isn’t supporting the urban farm plan. “It has everything the community needs,” Mohamed pointed out, speaking on behalf of herself and three other women from her community. 

“I’m a little bit emotional and very upset. It is the only hope and only vision that this neighborhood has. It’s exactly what will serve the neighborhood.”

‘I plug my nose’

Photo by TESHA M. CHRISTENSEN
“This meeting is an active meeting,” said Cassandra Holmes on June 17. She asked community members to take out their phones, and engage in grassroots organizing by calling the mayor and their city council members one by one, asking them to support the East Phillips Indoor Urban Farm. And residents did just that.

“People tell me, “I plug my nose when I drive past your neighborhood,” observed Steve Sandberg, who encouraged people to call 311 when they smell a bad odor.

This is the sort of pollution that the Clark/Berglin Environmental Justice Law was enacted by the state legislature in 2008 to curb.

Forty-year Phillips resident and former state legislator Karen Clark authored the bill to reduce the amount of pollution in this South Minneapolis area, particularly in the Arsenic Triangle near Cedar and 28th where the Smith Foundry and Bituminous Roadways asphalt plant still operate, belching out fumes each day over Phillips, the Midtown Greenway, and South High School.

“This is what environmental injustice looks like,” Clark said. 

She pointed out that Phillips has a disproportionate amount of kids with lead poisoning, which can cause permanent neurological damage. The emergency room is full of Phillips residents who need treatment for asthma. Lawns were remediated for arsenic.

The Clark/Berglin Environmental Justice Law requires that any project in this neighborhood be reviewed by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency to analyze the cumulative pollution effects — not only what will be caused by the new or expanded project. This includes city projects, such as the proposal to expand the city’s existing public works facility onto the adjacent 7.5-acre Roof Depot site. 

The city’s water maintenance facility, known as the East Water Yard, is currently located on 2.4 acres in Ward 3 at Hennepin Ave. E. and 5th Ave. N. It dates back 120 years and is the hub for maintaining the city’s 1,000 miles of water mains, 16,000 valves, and street holes, and 8,000 hydrants. The Water Distribution’s 100 maintenance staff performs valve operations, greasing and packing of hydrants, street manhole repairs, main water repairs, and leak detection. 

Replacing the maintenance yard is the last major unfinished piece of a 25-year-old master plan for updating city Department of Public Works facilities. The neighborhood organization, East Phillips Improvement Coalition (EPIC), was not notified of this plan until 2015 after it was engaged in negotiations to purchase the Roof Depot site. The city threatened eminent domain, and bought it instead of EPIC.

The city’s plans for the former Roof Depot site involve using the entire 16.4 acres to store manhole covers, sewer pipes, and sand-salt mix, and send out public work’s fleet of diesel trucks into other areas, concentrating the air pollution. EPNI has asked the city for a portion of the land over the past few years, drawing up plans for three acres, then two acres, and then one acre. 

“They said ‘No,” pointed out Holmes. And they haven’t once allowed the community group to present to the city council.

This is despite the city’s own core principal of community engagement, specifically stating the right of citizens who are affected to be involved.

“We have not had that right,” stated Phillips resident Brad Pass.

‘We don’t want any more trucks’

Those gathered on June 17 see the trouble residents have finding apartments and homes they can afford. They see the problem of not having access to fresh, green vegetables. They want their kids to have better. They want to be part of fixing things for their neighborhood and the world, and they have some bright ideas about using aquaponics and solar power in their corner of South Minneapolis. They’re inspired by the Midtown Greenway and want to fashion a neighborhood that places a high priority on biking and walking – two methods of travel that are accessible to the poor and the rich, build better health, and don’t spew pollution into the air.

They have already received some grant money, and have worked to make this affordable and more green by pinpointing a large building that they can reuse. 

In the past, neighborhood organizers have staved off the Hennepin County Garbage Transfer Station at Cedar and 28th in the mid 1990s; kept out the Midtown Eco-burner (Cogenerating Plant) in 2007; and convinced Xcel Energy to bury high voltage power lines in 2009. They were also able to transform the land at Cedar and 24th into a busy cultural and recreation center, garnering grants and other support for the massive project. They’re committed to doing that here.

Holmes stated, “We want to live a long life, and we don’t want any more trucks in our community.”

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

The following letters were written to city officials and submitted to The Alley.

“Right to be involved – Public participation is based on the belief that those who are affably a decision have a right to be involved in the decision-making process.” (Passed by Minneapolis City Council in 2007 – updated in 2014).

 I am Shontal Lajuenesse. Why has public works and the city council REFUSED to allow the East Phillips Community to present our East Phillips indoor Urban farm plan at any of your meetings??? We DO NOT want your pollution and congestion. We have enough already. And Yes! We want clean water, but we also deserve to BREATHE. Where is the justice? 

Shontal Lajuenesse

I am Amy Pass, and I have lived in the East Phillips neighborhood for the last 21 years. The residents of East Phillips already are exposed to high levels of pollution, and my daughter was tested and found to have high levels of arsenic when she was a preschooler. Our neighborhood is full of minority people and people of low socio economic status, and the city’s plan to put a water maintenance yard at the former Roof Depot site is nothing short of environmental racism and elitism. The neighborhood has clearly stated opposition to the city’s plan and has proposed an alternate plan that would decrease pollution, increase affordable housing, create jobs, and increase quality of life for our neighborhood. 

Why would the city refuse to even listen to the community? 

Why would the city chose to add stress and pollution to an already suffering neighborhood? 

Why won’t the city even HEAR the plan that the citizens of the neighbourhood propose? 

We’re asking for your assistance in helping our neighborhood to be heard. We look forward to your quick response. 

Sincerely,

Amy Pass

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Your concerns are her concerns

Photo submitted
Commissioner Angela Conley, along with other leaders and community members, celebrate the completion of nearly two years of construction at Peavey Park on May 31, 2019.Hennepin County invested funding for a sidewalk at the park. Other improvements include new basketball courts, play areas, pavilion and more.

Commissioner Angela Conley wants constituents guiding decisions from the 24th floor

By Tesha M. Christensen

Editor’s note: This is the second in a two-part series reprinted courtesy of the Longfellow Nokomis Messenger. The first part ran in the June 2019 edition of The Alley.

Addressing unsheltered homelessness is an issue Hennepin County District 4’s new County Commissioner Angela Conley is passionate about, and one that local residents focused on when she was door-knocking during her campaign.

Many years ago, Conley had to leave where she was living for safety reasons and was technically homeless. “That experience taught me ways in which we can do better,” said Conley, who later spent 20 years working in social work at both the county and state level. “I know housing and having a place to sleep at night are basic human rights.”

Photo SUBMITTED
Hennepin County Commissioner Angela Conley (left); Ashani Price, Specialist, ARNG; and Colonel Lori Allert, AN, USAR, on Memorial Day 2019 at the Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery, the 1st integrated cemetery in the state.

Conley believes that the answer to fixing this issue is funding, and hopes to see a number of different agencies partnering together with direction from the state. This way, someone from Washington County can stay within their community and not go to a shelter in Hennepin County because that’s the only one that has space. 

“This is a lot bigger than just Hennepin County,” said Conley.

Plus the answer requires more than providing a bed and a mat to those who are homeless. It will require that – and on-ramps to supportive housing and permanent housing. “We have to meet people where they are at,” observed Conley. 

Right now, Hennepin County operates as a referral-based system which means that someone might get referred to four or five other agencies to meet his or her varying needs. Conley said, “It’s often a full-time job for people to get chemical health services over here and mental health services over here, and then help with finding employment over in this direction. All of that should be under one roof.” 

She added, “We should be doing it with people who are involved in our shelter system because housing stability is when you have the support you need to maintain your own housing. ” 

That costs money, Conley recognizes, so she’s looking at where money is being spent now, evaluating if the outcomes are good, and questioning if that money should be spent elsewhere.

“We are moving in the right direction, but we’re still not where we should be,” stated Conley. “We’re still busting at the seams.”

According to the Wilder Foundation, Minnesota is seeing the highest numbers of homelessness in the 30 years they’ve been tracking it. She pointed out, “Homelessness has jumped 10% in the last three years.”

Conley is taking a close look at how the county invests in shelters and supportive housing, as well as real estate.

“We’ve got a market out here that not a lot of people can afford anymore. It’s harder to buy a home. Houses go up for sale and they’re snatched up right away. Rent keeps going up, but wages don’t,” she remarked. When people get out of jail, landlords won’t rent to them. And women and children fleeing domestic violence make up a large percentage of the homeless and have specific needs before they can get back on their feet.

There are also members of the community who don’t go to shelters, and some of those people came together last year at the Hiawatha Encampment, the largest encampment Minnesota had ever seen. 

As a Southside resident, Conley drove past the Hiawatha Encampment regularly.  She recognizes there are many reasons why people opt to not use shelters, such as not being able to bring a loved one or beloved pet. Others don’t think the shelters are safe, and worry that they don’t have a place to lock up their belongings. Addiction is also an issue, and opioid addiction is hitting the fourth district hard, Conley said.

She pointed out that encampment was full of many Native American and African Americans – the two groups experiencing the highest levels of homelessness. “You had a group of folks who found community amongst each other and who chose to live amongst each other,” Conley observed.

“There are also 200 to 300 people who sleep on the trains overnight. So this is an issue that not a lot of people have talked about.” 

According to Conley, the county has divested from shelters and invested in affordable housing over the years. Her question there is: “Affordable to who?”

All of the affordable housing is calculated based on median income, and affordable workforce housing is at 60% of the median income. “We have people at 30% of the median income. Where can they go?” she asked.

Also lacking is shelter that is culturally specific, and meets people where they are at even if they aren’t ready for addiction treatment.

Conley co-chairs Heading Home Hennepin, which brings together the county, city of Minneapolis and others to look at the ways people might be able to work together to provide resources to create the infrastructure needed to house more people. 

“If we make these investments on the front end then the resources are already there, and we wouldn’t have to go into an encampment and provide services there because we were already on the front end working upstream to stop the build-up at the bottom,” said Conley. “There’s a lot of possibility in taking on this issue head-on. It’s going to require the political will for people to say, ‘Yes, this is an issue.’”

Conley also pushed for unsheltered homelessness to be included in the county’s federal legislative platform this year for the first time.

WHAT IS A COUNTY 

COMMISSIONER?

During her campaign, Conley started with that question because she loves talking about the county. 

“I have spent my career in public service, and I wanted everybody to know what commissioners do because it’s a level of government that is sort of invisible,” observed Conley. “A lot of people know who their state reps are, they know who their senator might be, they know the governor, they know their city council, but do you know who your commissioner is? Raise your hand. We’d be in a room of 25 people and one person might raise their hand.”

She’d point out, “The county is involved in pretty much everything you do,” and deals with more than just the big, contentious issues of lightrail and stadiums.

When you take out your garbage, it’s burned at the county energy recovery center downtown. The road you drive on to get to work everyday may be a county road even in the city, and if you’re concerned about safety on it you’ll need to talk to the county. If you are on a fixed income and you need help paying for medical care or you’re experiencing food insecurity, you may apply at a county office. 

“This is your largest government entity aside from the state, and it’s operating a $2.4 billion budget. We’re the second largest county in the Midwest — only to Cook County near Chicago. We’re very, very big with a far reach in people’s everyday lives,” stated Conley. 

Her office will be intentional about holding community office hours for citizens to share concerns and ideas. The first was held at Sabathani, and others will be held at various places throughout the large fourth district including Longfellow, by the airport, in Cedar-Riverside, Phillips and the Central neighborhood. 

“We want folks to know that their commissioner is very interested in having community lead on key decisions,” said Conley.

In March, she was part of a meeting focused on the Cedar/Highway 77/Highway 62/Edgewater area, and was most interested in hearing what those in attendance had to say. “I think community should be leading on what they know is best for their neighborhood,” stated Conley, and her staff took a ton of notes at the meeting. She plans to hold a follow-up meeting to talk about how those ideas can be implemented.

“That’s the kind of leadership you can find out of the District 4 office,” stated Conley. “I don’t want to be in this space making up solutions based on what I think the community needs. I want people in the fourth district to be guiding decisions that happen up here on the 24th floor because these are decisions that ultimately affect your life.”

For a long time, Conley didn’t feel included in decision making and so she’s taking that experience and turning it around.

“This really truly is the district four people’s office,” said Conley. “I want people to know that they have access to their commissioner, and their concerns are my concerns.”

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AIM: Work goes on because needs go on

By Laura Waterman Wittstock and Elaine J. Salinas

In the 50 years of its formal history, the American Indian Movement (AIM) has given witness to a great many changes. 

We say formal history, because the movement existed for 500 years without a name. The leaders and members of today’s AIM never fail to remember all of those who have traveled on before, having given their talent and their lives for the survival of the people.

At the core of the movement is Indian leadership under the direction of NeeGawNwayWeeDun, Clyde H. Bellecourt, and others. Making steady progress, the movement has transformed policy making into programs and organizations that have served Indian people in many communities. These policies have consistently been made in consultation with spiritual leaders and elders.The success of these efforts is indisputable, but perhaps even greater than the accomplishments is the vision defining what AIM stands for.

Indian people were never intended to survive the settlement of Europeans in the Western Hemisphere, our Turtle Island.  With the strength of a spiritual base, AIM has been able to clearly articulate the claims of Native Nations and has had the will and intellect to put forth those claims.

The movement was founded to turn the attention of Indian people toward a renewal of spirituality which would impart the strength of resolve needed to reverse the ruinous policies of the United States, Canada, and other colonialist governments of Central and South America. At the heart of AIM is deep spirituality and a belief in the connectedness of all Indian people.

During the past 30 years, The American Indian Movement has organized communities and created opportunities for people across the Americas and Canada. AIM is headquartered in Minneapolis with chapters in many other cities, rural areas and Indian Nations.

AIM has repeatedly brought successful suit against the federal government for the protection of the rights of Native Nations guaranteed in treaties, sovereignty, the United States Constitution, and laws. The philosophy of self-determination upon which the movement is built is deeply rooted in traditional spirituality, culture, language and history. AIM develops partnerships to address the common needs of the people. Its first mandate is to ensure the fulfillment of treaties made with the United States. This is the clear and unwavering vision of The American Indian Movement.

It has not been an easy path. Spiritual leaders and elders foresaw the testing of AIM’s strength and stamina. Doubters, infiltrators, those who wished they were in the leadership, and those who didn’t want to be but wanted to tear down and take away have had their turns. No one, inside or outside the movement, has so far been able to destroy the will and strength of AIM’s solidarity. Men and women, adults and children are continuously urged to stay strong spiritually, and to always remember that the movement is greater than the accomplishments or faults of its leaders.

Inherent in the spiritual heart of AIM is knowing that the work goes on because the need goes on.

Indian people live on Mother Earth with the clear understanding that no one will assure the coming generations except ourselves. No one from the outside will do this for us. And no person among us can do it all for us, either. Self-determination must be the goal of all work. Solidarity must be the first and only defense of the members.

Editor’s note: This is reprinted from the MayDay 2019 tabloid courtesy of In The Heart of the Beast.

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What is a ‘beloved community’?

Let’s move from Race to Culture

by Minkara Tezet, Cultural Wellness Center

 “Our goal is to create a beloved community and that will require a qualitative change in our souls as well as a quantitative change in our lives.” – Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

“It is in community (nuit) that a person is socialized (remut); he is given an identity, a place of belonging, human dignity, and personhood. The community (nuit) is a critical concept that infuses the word remut with meaning.  ‘Society’ here does not remain an abstraction devoid of a sense if cosmic purpose.”  – Seba Ahmed Azzahir

Part of my study at the Cultural Wellness Center has been to learn how to live and practice empathy, not sympathy. 

The empathy we are called to practice is a lost art. 

It is the practice of empathy where we meet the importance of Dr. King’s teachings about the beloved community.  It was through the protests, marches and boycotts King worked to show the world what it means to walk a mile in the shoes of someone else. Community is the consistent presence where we are reflections of people who feel like we feel and who feel what we feel. 

This is what I call community. 

King’s life exemplified, we are a community called to cultivate the empathy that we share with those closest to our hearts. His teachings force me to imagine what I want for those closest to my heart. What is the life I imagine for them?  

It is clear to me Dr. King was fighting in order that others might have empathy for the plight of Black people in the United States. For me the impact of this push to change the world has driven me to want for our family and our community to experience the capacity of this empathy that allows us to be together.  I want us to recognize we are created in the image of Creation. Our collective purpose is to see how our ability to create and produce connections beyond the pain is what gives us power.

 I have deep desire for people of African heritage to realize we have stories that connect us to the first time in Creation. These stories are what help us to see our capacity to demonstrate empathy. In practicing empathy, we reflect the divine presence in Kem (black man/black woman).

I am consciously aware that we can see the struggles we have experienced, and we can see the impact these experiences have placed on our ability to be empathetic towards one another or towards ourselves. 

The idea of the Beloved Community commits us to collectively practice empathy. And although it is painful to face the pains of the lives of those we care for, learning to see the value of empathy as we reconstruct the Beloved Community is what allows us to elevate past the pain.  Dr. King saw a better future for all of humanity through the healing of his people’s relationship with themselves. As he taught us to demonstrate the invisible power of blackness, he invoked purpose. As we continue to recover, we must see that community – Beloved Community – is meant for us.  

Seeing that we are community attaches us to the creative purpose of the universe. It is a place that we must create for ourselves, rebuild our sense of a collective purpose and vision. 

This cannot be done without us all being willing to search our hearts and share the truth that resides inside of our souls.  

The sharing gives us the power to see the value of empathy. Valuing empathy allows us to build in and with peace as the focus of our desire. Empathy is the bedrock of the Beloved Community. 

The rebuilding of the Beloved Community is at the heart of our desire to right the wounds of racialized objectification.  

Dr. King said, “He who works against community is working against the whole of creation.”  

The pain held in the heart of our people must no longer bind our beings to brutality of the past. In the cultivation and production of empathy we learn our humanities are intertwined. We have the difficult work of unravelling the levels of hidden pain in order to see how our truth telling and community healing can lift us beyond the suffering of being racially objectified. As I have considered the radical goal of Dr. King’s vision for a Beloved Community it becomes conceivable with the shift of “Moving from Race to Culture.”

Moving from Race to Culture forces each of us to see how humanity is harmed by racialized objectification. 

This shifting from race to culture requires we trace the journey of our peoplehood back to Creation, back to cosmos.  

To create the Beloved Community, we are required to begin to see how our action relate to an innate peace and harmony. It is in this learning to harmonize peace with ourselves we become capable of demonstrating empathy for others. 

The primary obstacle is a lack of empathy for others. We are in need of giving and receiving the acknowledgement that naturally comes from empathy. 

Healing begins in being able to empathize with the forces, energies, lives, beings, creatures in nature.  It begins when we are able to see the tree and feel the experience of the tree’s ability to survive a long harsh winter.

Founded in 1996, the mission of the Cultural Wellness Center is to unleash the power of citizens to heal themselves and build community. The Cultural Wellness Center is one of the primary community and cultural knowledge-production organizations in the Twin Cities region. They partner with organizations, institutions, and people within communities to develop models to solve problems and create lasting solutions. The Cultural Wellness Center is located within the Midtown Global Market, 920 E. Lake St. Look on the back page of each Alley newspaper for more on its activities.

Editor’s note: This is reprinted from the MayDay 2019 tabloid courtesy of In The Heart of the Beast. This year marks the 400th anniversary of slave ships arriving to the new colonies that would beome the United States. Earlier than that, Africans had been seized by slave traders and brought to North America, South America, and the Caribbean since about 1501.

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For 50 years of immense work and vision – thanks for American  Indian Movement

COURTESY OF AIM
Muhammed Ali (back left) and AIM founder Clyde Bellecourt, July 1978.

By Sandy Spieler

I arrived in Minneapolis in 1973 and moved into the collective household right across the street from Little Earth of United Tribes just as it was being built. Out of that house, the MayDay Parade was born, and so the parade begins each year from the field alongside Little Earth of United Tribes. 

In my first month in Minneapolis, I ventured to the Little Earth gym to hear you of the American Indian Movement speak of your work. 

Your voices shook me to my core.

Your call for spiritual grounding as social justice and truth reached inside me and woke within me a need to reckon with colonial histories. You brought me to this neighborhood with a cry to deal with the layers of institutionalized trauma and live in reciprocal relationship with the life–giving majesty of this world.

I owe much gratitude to you of the American Indian Movement (AIM) for teaching me so much. While your work upholding Native Communities is often detailed, I know I am not alone in noting the profound influence you have had on my life as a white woman.  Your influence in the world is great, and with each passing year I recognize the immensity of your influence in this neighborhood. Your work continues to inspire and challenge me. 

Please accept my profound thanks and congratulations on 50 years of visionary work. 

Editor’s note: This is reprinted from the MayDay 2019 tabloid courtesy of In The Heart of the Beast.

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SUDAN democracy supporters

PETER MOLENAAR

Local people from Sudan Africa rallied with their supporters at the state capital on June 18, 2019. Among the demands: Send the former dictator to the International Criminal Court.

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Navigation Center closes

Coalition partners involved in the temporary Navigation Center in south Minneapolis reflected June 3 on the months’ long effort to provide a safe and service-rich environment for people formerly living at the Franklin-Hiawatha homeless encampment.

The Navigation Center at 2109 Cedar Ave. S. has closed after operating since late December of 2018. At its peak occupancy, it provided beds and shelter to 176 people in three sprung structures. Seventy-four people who stayed at the center have been connected to housing, nursing homes or treatment programs — a high success rate compared to traditional shelters. 

Red Lake Nation, Simpson Housing Services and the Metropolitan Urban Indian Directors (MUID) partnered to provide services onsite and led transition efforts while the city of Minneapolis provided funding and support for the Navigation Center.

Through the Navigation Center, people were able to secure an array of services including pathways to permanent housing, income, healthcare and stability. Individual case management services were provided onsite by partner agencies and included traditional American Indian healing activities, all of which were voluntary. 

Red Lake Nation will build a culturally sensitive, 110-unit affordable housing development on the Navigation Center site, with a treatment clinic on the first floor.

This update by city consultant Margaret King, who managed the Navigation Center, was shared by Ward 9 Council Member Alondra Cano in her e-newsletter.

 

46 STILL LIVING AT 

CENTER AS OF May 22

• 10 had firm housing or treatment 

admission dates for prior to June 3

• 28 had alternate shelter for interim 

period before getting firm housing

• 8  were not accepting services

130 exits as of May 22, 2019

• 68 positive

• 60 negative

• 2 deaths

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Backyard Community Health Hub July 2019

ckyarsd

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