NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Saturday September 5th 2015

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August 2015 Alley Newspaper

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Honoring Water 150 Miles The Chippewa River Water Walk

1.20b V40 #8 Photos Chippewa11149443_10205905303448885_934344166686270152_nBy Joe Kruse

In the Midewiwin belief system, the indigenous spiritual practice of the Ojibway people, there are eight prophecies that have come and are coming to pass. The prophecies take into account the migration of the Ojibway people from the east to the upper Midwest where food (manoomin/wild rice) grows on water, the invasion of the light-skinned race, and the struggle for survival among and resistance to that colonization. Bode, a long-time water walker, and I sat in a minivan watching other walkers hike along a beautiful stretch of a rural county road as he explained this part of his spirituality to me. The rain was lightly misting our windshield. He went on to describe the eighth and final prophecy, when people of all skin colors will live in harmony. He said that, on these walks, he has started to see this prophecy fulfilled. He has seen white people, Native people, and people of color work together to pray for the water and our future. He sees how, while we are praying for the healing of the water, the water seems to be healing us.

This is just one of the many beautiful lessons I had the privilege of learning while I participated in the Chippewa River Water Walk this past April. “The Nibi (Water) Walks are Indigenous-led, extended ceremonies to pray for the water. Every step is taken in prayer and gratitude for water, our life giving force” (nibiwalk.org). Led by Ojibway elder Sharon Day and began by a group of Ojibway grandmothers about a decade ago, these walks are both a spiritual practice of walking as a means of praying for the water and our relationship to it, and a political act of cultivating awareness around the continued violent exploitation and colonization of Turtle Island.

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“All the news?” Never!

Chuck Michener (l) and Kurt Bullert (r) were inaugurated with newly released “The Alley” T-Shirts and to the Midtown Phillips Festival July 25th by inveterate Neighborhood activist Joseph Spangler at Stewart Park. Photo Credit: Harvey Winje

Chuck Michener (l) and Kurt Bullert (r) were inaugurated with newly released “The Alley” T-Shirts and to the Midtown Phillips Festival July 25th by inveterate Neighborhood activist Joseph Spangler at Stewart Park. Photo Credit: Harvey Winje

BY HARVEY WINJE, Senior Volunteer Editor and Outreach Coordinator

The Alley Newspaper received an e-mail with these questions from a reader:

“Does The Alley Newspaper fact check submitted articles?”

“Does The Alley Newspaper do the ‘malicious bidding’ for some neighborhood leaders?”

These important questions reminded us that we don’t take space often enough to explain how we serve our mission to “inform and engage”.

This month, we are taking time to describe how the content within each Alley Newspaper is determined with the hope of giving a voice to all members of the community. To set the context, we’ll start at the beginning in 1976.

When and how did The Alley Newspaper decide what news to publish?

40 years ago, two people were talking about the benefits of people having more in-depth conversations about community affairs. They noted every day encounters and community meetings especially did not provide enough time for substantial conversation. One of them had seen a magazine in which the content was a dialogue between writers; in fact, that was its name.

From that conversation, The Alley Newspaper was founded to be another means by which neighbors could converse with one another in addition to across backyard fences, at the store, and by telephone.

To accomplish that goal, The Alley invites community residents, employees, businesses, organizations or students within the community, to have their announcements, opinions, and organizing efforts included in the newspaper.

Question: Does The Alley fact check articles when they are submitted? Read the rest of this entry »

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Location, Location tells many “Tales”

Amos Pierce is the only person of those in the 35 graves in Block 3 Row 1 to have a headstone. His marker serves as a touchstone for finding everyone else in Row 1. The three-link chain on his marker tells us that he was a member of IOOF the International Order of Odd Fellows lodge—the links stand for their motto friendship, love and truth. But there is something wrong with his marker. It gives his death year as 1900 but he died on May 19, 1901. The reason why his stone was never corrected will likely never be known.

Amos Pierce is the only person of those in the 35 graves in Block 3 Row 1 to have a headstone. His marker serves as a touchstone for finding everyone else in Row 1. The three-link chain on his marker tells us that he was a member of IOOF the International Order of Odd Fellows lodge—the links stand for their motto friendship, love and truth. But there is something wrong with his marker. It gives his death year as 1900 but he died on May 19, 1901. The reason why his stone was never corrected will likely never be known.

By Sue Hunter Weir

There are 35 graves in Block 3 Row 1. Eleven of them are empty. There are two people buried in each of two graves for a total of 25 burials in all. All but one of the burials took place between late 1899 and 1901. The graves, which are located in the northwest corner of the cemetery, near the intersection of Cedar Avenue and 29th Street, cost $10 a piece, sometimes a little less if the grave was for a child. These are 25 people connected by the fact that they are buried on the same small strip of land in South Minneapolis. Even though most of them are not related to each other, they have quite a lot in common—not enough to draw any major conclusions from but enough to create a picture of what was happening at a certain place at a particular time.

Twelve of the people have names that ended in “son,” a sure sign that they have some connection to one of the Scandinavian countries. Six more, although they were not “sons,” were born in Norway or Sweden. One man, August Sohlman, was born in Finland and Minnie Smith (probably Schmidt when she arrived) was born in Germany. Only four of the adults were born in the United States. Two children, Gilda Fregaard and John Jackson, were born in Minneapolis, and one baby, the son of Martin and Hannah Ulvestad, was stillborn here.

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Midtown Phillips Neighborhood Association News August 2015

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EPIC Report-August 2015

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August 2015 Ventura Village Neighborhood News

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The Phillips Aquatics Center is quietly funded by MPRB and on track for a 2017 opening!

pool-sketchBY DENNY BENNETT, President of Minneapolis Swims

Nate, my 16 year old son and I attended the July 15th Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board meeting to watch the final resolutions get passed that would approve the last $417,000 of a $5,422,500 budget that has been raised to restore and expand the aquatics facilities at the Phillips Community Center. Altogether, there would be three resolutions that would affect the renovated Phillips Pool that were up for review.

The first, under the Administration and Finance Committee, was resolution 2015-249: Resolution Accepting the Financial Support Offered by the Minneapolis Public Schools for the Phillips Community Center Pool Facility in the Amount of $150,000 Per Year, through 2020, in Operating Funds and $1,750,000 in Capital Funds in FY 2016 Contingent on Mutual Agreement on the Six Expectations Listed in the June 18, 2015 Minneapolis Public School Resolution.

This passed unanimously.

Next, under the Recreation Committee, was resolution 2015-250: Resolution Affirming a Commitment to Create a Memorandum of Understanding with Minneapolis Public Schools Related for Scheduling, Programming & Facilities.

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Rose-Colored Glasses August 2015 Dave’s Dumpster

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Violence like parasite; also treatable

By St. Paul’s Youth Group

Violence is like a parasite; infectious, dangerous, unbiased, and yet also treatable.

Fortunately, the steps in treating both are also very similar, and like all parasites we will eventually find a cure.

According to cureviolence.org the essential elements of curing violence coincide with the treatment of a disease: 1) interrupting transmission of the disease, 2) reducing the risk of the highest risk, and 3) changing community norms.

“I heard guns firing so I couldn’t sleep until 2:05 AM. I was scared and I can’t sleep now.”…Anthony

“People have come into my house and robbed our money and my dad has to work harder.”…Edwin

You all can make a difference, and we want to remind you who you are setting an example for.

“We can make small changes that can become big impacts in our neighborhood.”…Jose

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