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“the alley” newspaper July 2020 issue

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“the alley” Newspaper June 2020 Issue

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What is Black is Real Black Manhood

By Minkara Tezet, Griot of Psychology and Psychiatry, Cultural Wellness Center

I thought of you last night. I heard your voice.  I heard your voice cry out through the veil.  You are a real Black Man.  You are the being that was called into being so long ago, Kem. You are he who was the first greeter of the Creator.  It was you who saw this face first.  What are you? Where did you come from and what made you? I am listening to this voice.  I am listening to you.  I am hearing Tefnut.  I hear her through these tears. She is the moisture that moistens the ground that is you. 

You are Kem and Geb. She is the waters that flow from the first time and she is in you, too. 

She is pushing through for you.  I am thinking of you. I am thinking of myself. I am thinking of the Black Man and all that it means to be him. All the pressure it feels to be Kem.  Kem is the Black. 

He is you. And he is me, too. 

I am crying to soothe this heat and this fire I feel for the conditions we find ourselves in. Personally, I want to burn all of this shit down and start over.  But my emotional connection to the rains and to the healing power of Tefnut won’t let me cause this pain.  She is pushing through and she is calling to you. She is asking each of us to allow the tears to flow so that her healing powers can show. 

She is healing me.  I hope you can see the tears I am crying for you, the Black Man. I hope you can see the tears I am shedding for myself. I feel the pressure it is to be you. I feel the pressure that makes us want to let Shu lose. I feel the pressure that drives the impulse over our use of fire and pain. Shu is the fire of the first time that also burns inside of you. Shu is the ancestor that you have allowed to come through and at times if left unchecked Shu will burn you, too. 

We are witnessing murders in the street and unchecked fire burning as we are no longer able to feel the waters of Tefnut pushing through.  We have emotional dams holding her back. We want to release. But it is not in us to share the tears we have with the world publicly. So, I am releasing my tears onto these sheets. To be a Black Man is to balance who we are and what we be.  To be a Black Man means to be someone who is complementary. We complement the divine feminine we are presencing.  If she is fly, we fly, too.  If she rises, we rise, too.

November 14, 2019 – Minkara Tezet (Excepted from What is Black is Real Black Manhood)

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Spirit of Phillips

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Midtown Phillips Neighborhood Association

Board Meeting: July 14, 6:30 – 8pm

A Community Forum with Senator Jeff Hayden: July 28, 6:30 – 7:30pm

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Welna Ace Hardware

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Please Make Minnesota PPE

By LEE LEICHENTRITT

There is a well-known shortage of PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) in the United States. Minnesotans and our fellow countrymen in the other 49 states are suffering because of the shortages of PPE. No employee should go without PPE. No child returning to school in the fall should be without clean and safe daily PPE. No one is expendable or worthless; all human beings should be valued.

One solution to Minnesota’s and America’s PPE shortage would be to invest in making PPE in Minnesota. There are a few options to make Minnesota-made PPE a reality. The first option would be to use the tax code to create incentives to investors to build PPE manufacturing plants in Minnesota. The second would be to establish a public-private partnership. The third would be for the State of Minnesota to build and operate its own PPE plant. The fourth would be for Minnesota and its neighbors to pool their talents and resources to create a multi-state organization that would utilize regional investments in time, talent, and treasure to create PPE.

The aforementioned options are suggestions to fix an ongoing problem this summer. History has shown us that the 1918 pandemic came in waves and that the first wave was not the most fatal. Minnesotans should be aware of the history of 1918 and willing to put shortage solutions into place now. United, we can produce enough PPE for all of our needs, and any surplus PPE could be sold to other states and to Canada.

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Seward Co-op

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Phillips Neighborhood Clinic: Things Open Up

By Harry Leeds

Our lives have changed tremendously over the past few months, and as we very slowly move towards normalcy, it is important to remember your healthy habits. Perhaps the first thing to keep in mind is that we are not out of the woods yet. The State of Minnesota has done a better than average job of social distancing and preparing hospitals. What this means, though, is that the spread of COVID-19 has slowed enough to (likely) ensure that everyone will have access to the medical treatment they deserve if they get sick. That’s what the models suggest, anyway. Social distancing and working from home are still important.

We might have slacked with our old, good health habits, but it is important to keep them up. I have often joked this last month that Jenny Craig is going to make a killing next year. If you are stuck at home, whether you are employed or not, it is tempting to eat junk food. These times are stressful, you worry about the next time you will be able to enjoy that doughnut, and supermarkets have been one of the few businesses to remain open.

The health benefits of eating a plant-based diet in the long term are pretty well established, but it is also important to think about the short term. High calorie foods can cause inflammation in the body, which basically means that your body thinks it is under attack. The effects on your mood and immune system are negative, and a poor diet can make you feel tired, sad, and reduce your ability to fight infection.

There is a way to boost your immune system, feel happier and more energized. That is to exercise. If you can safely go outside for a walk while staying six feet away from others, you might find it will do some good.
It can feel overwhelming to try and keep up these healthy habits, especially with the stress that we are all under. But if you make eating healthy and exercise routine, you may find you will look forward to them. Some people find that rather than thinking about what foods they shouldn’t eat, they think about healthy food they do like (Don’t think, “I shouldn’t eat the doughnut,” but, “I love roasted sweet potatoes.”) If you find yourself with little to do, now is a good time to try out some new recipes. It could be a welcome, and healthy, distraction.

Harry Leeds is a nursing student at the University of Minnesota and nursing clinician at the Phillips Neighborhood Clinic (PNC) 2742 15th Ave. So

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Something I Said: What Good Safeguarding Income by Risking Life to Only Afford a Good Funeral?

By DWIGHT HOBBES

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz extended the corona stay-at-home order through May 18th. While not nearly long enough, it was a welcome reprieve from the threat of people being let loose on the street to keep spreading this catastrophic contagion.

This is no thanks to hundreds who demonstrated in mid-April outside Walz’s home as the Liberate Minnesota Movement, demanding he lift the order. The rationale: it’s costing the economy. Yes, businesses have faltered, even closed and people are laid off, fired. Hence, you had indignant folk hollering slogans like “We can sue! We can revolt over this tyrant. He is supposed to be working for us” and organizer Michelle Even telling Fox News, “We want our rights restored.”

Twin Cities’ activist, Michelle Gross, took a different take, telling “the alley” newspaper, “Forcing communities and businesses to reopen prematurely harms workers. We are seeing this now with the order to reopen meat packing plants. People will be forced to choose between risk and income because anyone who refuses to go back to work at dangerous work sites will lose their unemployment.”

Protesters raising hell over lost income need a reality check. I saw the television coverage and it was a horde of white folk – few wearing masks, none doing social distancing – who look like they never missed a meal a day in their lives. They can just suck it up, make do with less and join the rest of us who’ve busted our asses to keep food on the table all our lives. Bottom line, what good does it do to safeguard your income if you risk not living long enough to do a damned with it except afford a good funeral?

As could be counted on, Trump the Chump, who’s downplayed the crisis and dodged accountability from day one, championed this willfully ignorant lunacy. Well, on May 4, U.S. News & World Report ran the headline “Reopening the Economy Would Add 233,000 Deaths by July but Save Millions of Jobs. In the story, “The number of Americans expected to die from the corona virus by the end of June will nearly double White House estimates circulated as recently as this week for total deaths through the course of the entire outbreak, according to [an] analysis from the Penn Wharton Budget Model.” Talk about do the math.

On May 12, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases director, Dr. Anthony Fauci, told the Senate Committee for Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions that reopening states too soon invites disaster, stating “Problems will escalate if states do not have the hospital capacity to treat patients and to isolate people exposed to the virus.”

Those protesters think there’s a problem now? God help us all if they get their way.

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Ingebretsen’s

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