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Monday November 24th 2014

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Nordic Ice with Spice – Having fun with spice, food, and imagination

02-heather-jansz-kitchenBy Carstens Smith

“It’s yummy, wicked good, ”enthusiastically exclaims Heather Jansz as she tastes rice pudding with lingonberries, coconut milk, cardamom, and ginger, a recipe she developed for the “Nordic Ice with Spice” class hosted by Ingebretsen’s on November 7. The class is a four course dinner and cooking class that features favorite Nordic ingredients, combined in new ways with liberal doses of spices.

Heather is well qualified to create such recipes. She is the Curry Diva, a chef who specializes in the cuisine of Sri Lanka and who incorporates Ayurvedic principles in her use of spices. A former co-owner of the Sri Lanka Curry House, a cookbook author, and chef for the Highland Grill’s Monday evening Curry Nights, Heather grew up on the island of Sri Lanka and is of Portuguese-Dutch descent. She learned from an early age how different ingredients and cultural foods can be combined in new and appealing ways.

Curries are a popular “food fashion” in the Scandinavian countries right now. The “Nordic Ice and Spice” class was inspired by this trend. It is intended to give participants a knowledge of spices and the confidence to create their own recipes. The four course dinner will have an appetizer course with imported Scandinavian cheeses and chutneys, and a platter of fish, bread, and curries, including a curry sauce the specifically complements lutefisk, (because we couldn’t forget lutefisk…). That is followed by a soup course of curried squash soup with smoked bacon, an entrée of spiced pork loin on savory barley, salads, and a desert course. The class is BYOB, with endless cups of Viking Biking coffee served.

The class will be held at Our Kitchen, 813 W. 36th St. Our Kitchen’s cozy size and the clear view of the kitchen creates a friendly, interactive atmosphere. “I want people to see, eat, talk, ask questions, and thoroughly enjoy themselves,” says Heather. Reservations are $75 a person. Please call Ingebretsen’s, 612.729.9333 to register. Visit www.ingebretsens.com for further information.

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November 2014 Alley Newspaper

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Carl Peterson Passed Jan. 6, 1912 – Oct. 9, 2014

1.10b Carl photo

By Patrick Cabello Hansel

He who passed the span

From horses to spaceships,

From telegrams to Twitter,

From sitting around the radio

On cold nights, listening

To “Hit Parade” and “Sky King”

To the first black and white TV,

Then color, then laptops,

Now watches you can surf from,

From the “ja” of Swedish

To the “yes” of English

To the “sí” of Spanish

All still spoken in his town,

His community, his Phillips.

His hands, trained to mold

Metal to magnificent shapes,

To caress his wife, to

Build his workshop,

Read the rest of this entry »

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Remembering Dad

By Janet Gillespie

Editor’s note: The Alley posed a couple dozen questions (omitted to save space) to Carl’s daughter Janet. Her personal anecdotal and illustrative answers have been arranged into this narrative by Sue Hunter Weir. We invite readers to enjoy this insight of Carl and Helen and to also use it as an example of writing about the loved ones in your families.

My dad was a second-generation American because his dad’s dad was born in Donovan, Illinois to Swedish immigrant parents. My dad’s mom was born in Sweden. She came to America just to visit and met my Grandpa at the Swedish Mission Tabernacle in Chicago (my grandpa was working as a motorman on the streetcars in Chicago at the time). Grandma was planning to return to Sweden and her sister was coming to visit. My Grandpa gave her an engagement ring before she returned to Sweden to tell her family she was going back to marry him. Her sister never came to America.

My grandpa had heard about Braham, Minnesota, a very Swedish community and he found out there was a farm for sale there. He purchased the farm for about $500.00 in 1911.

Dad was the oldest of six siblings born to Alfred Theodore (always known as A.T.and Bertha Marie Peterson. Dad grew up in a Swedish speaking home and knew no English when he started in school. He graduated from Braham High School in 1931 and farmed for a little while with his dad and brothers but farming wasn’t really his thing. He always liked to tinker and make things so he came to Minneapolis in the early 30’s to attend Dunwoody where he studied sheet metal.

My dad’s first job was at Shafers. I don’t know how long he worked there but the nature of the business was that you worked while they had jobs and then you were laid off. So he was laid off by some of the shops he worked in but was rehired later. He worked for some time at Cronstroms as well as several smaller shops. During World War II he received an exemption because most sheet metal shops turned to munitions plants during the war. In 1955 after being laid off he got hired at the University of Minnesota in Plant Services. He worked there until 1963 when he left and started his own business. While working there he was setting up his own shop and buying equipment and beginning to make cake pans. Read the rest of this entry »

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Carl: Curious, Sense of Wonder and Fearlessness

Pans made by Carl and his workers at Domestic Sheet Metal and sold to Maid of Scandinavia Catalog

Pans made by Carl and his workers at Domestic Sheet Metal and sold to Maid of Scandinavia Catalog

By Thorbjorn Adam

I met Carl the day my family moved to Ventura Village. He was scraping the last ice off his immaculate sidewalks. Over the next years I had the privilege to spend countless hours with him. We worked on projects together and we traveled to his boyhood farm. We shared weekly meals together.  Three themes remind of me of Carl’s life. His endless curiosity, his deep sense of wonder and his constant fearlessness. Even as a boy he tried to make wings to fly like the birds. Be it nature or modern technology he was always in awe. Keeping him off a ladder was next to impossible. My family and I will miss Carl.

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November 2014 Ventura Village Neighborhood News

Ventura-Village-News-November-2014-Issue-copy-web

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Phillips Clean Sweep

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The 2014 Phillips Clean Sweep was an incredible success. The weather was perfect and the best part of the day was the great time all the residents and volunteers from all four Phillips Neighborhoods had. In the three hours between Breakfast at the Welna Hardware parking lot & Lutheran Social Services AND Lunch & Entertainment at Stewart Park, neighbors removed an amazing 28,580 lbs. of trash from the ‘hood. That total does not include untallied mountains of recyclable bottles, cans and paper.

The Annual Phillips Clean Sweep is the largest such event in Minneapolis and is truly a community building experience. The 2015 Phillips Clean Sweep will be on Saturday, October 10th, 2015. Put it on your calendar and don’t miss it.

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124 Year History of Franklin Library Reflects Community, U.S. and World events

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By Cassie Warholm-Wohlenhaus

This year the Franklin Library celebrates its 100th year serving a large area now called Phillips Community and Elliot Park, Whittier, Corcoran, and Powderhorn Park Neighborhoods. Exploring this history through research into the library’s annual reports and other documents from 1914 to 2014 has revealed a fascinating and intimate bond between a community and its library.

2014 marks 100 years of service in the beautiful Carnegie library building at 1314 E. Franklin Avenue, but the library as an organization predates the building. It originally operated out of two rented rooms in the A.J. Bernier building at Franklin and 17th starting in 1890. In the library’s earliest days this was a neighborhood largely of Scandinavian immigrants, and a huge collection of Swedish, Norwegian and Danish books and newspapers was in constant demand. An influx of Jewish immigrants in the 1920s added Yiddish and Hebrew to the languages heard at Franklin. The life of the library has reflected the community around it since the early days. The effects of world events and community unrest could also be seen—the neighborhood’s men went off to fight in World War I and mothers kept their children home during Spanish flu and smallpox epidemics. The community needed information and entertainment during times of trial, and Franklin offered an important community space for that. Despite being a small branch library, Franklin often had the largest circulation numbers in the Minneapolis Public Library system.

The 1930s hit the surrounding areas hard, and the Great Depression’s effects of high unemployment and extreme poverty crept into the library as well. Budget cuts, little money for books, and few open hours meant that Franklin’s librarians struggled to serve the community. In these hard times, though, the neighborhood needed its library more than ever. With strong support from the community and a need for books, programs, and a free community space, the Minneapolis Public Library system agreed to expand the library building in 1937.

World War II brought with it many changes: loss of neighborhood men to military service, women working in large numbers outside the home in local factories, offices, and stores, extensive rationing, and a focus on international events and the war. Franklin Library supported the war effort by maintaining a collection of current books and newspapers on world issues, serving as a center for Red Cross work, and by being a community space where people could come together during this difficult time. 

The 1950s began a push toward modernity in the library and the neighborhood: the building was converted from coal to oil heating and Franklin Avenue was widened and paved for the first time. Plans for the expansion of the University of Minnesota to the West Bank and construction of an East-West freeway (94) were underway. The neighborhood’s makeup was also changing: Scandinavian immigration had begun its decline in the 1930s, and more African Americans and Native Americans were calling t Phillips and surrounding neighborhoods home than ever before. Read the rest of this entry »

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November 2014 Spirit of Phillips

november2014-dave

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All in the Family

By Peter Molenaar

Misfits and “free thinking” types should take Cedar Avenue to Hiawatha, west to Highway 94 to 394/12 all the way to Willmar, Minnesota. There you will find a sanctuary. Actually, this particular Unitarian church was founded by my Grandpa Peter Molenaar. I journeyed there recently to attend a reunion.

The first encounter was with a second cousin. Mega-factory pig farms had put him out of the hog business years ago. Skeptical with regard to the emerging market for free range pork, Jay has taken to selling John Deere Tractors.

Mary Anne, now at 90 years of age, was next on the scene. Taking both her hands, I bowed my head while apologizing for having disrupted one of her Bible lessons. The gift of her last hug will not be forgotten.

In came first cousin Steve who had been an accountant in a polyethylene injection molding company. These days he is a “hired hand” on the 450 acre corn and soybean farm his wife owns. Between the two of us, it was determined that the existence of God is not proven in the ‘doctrine of first cause.’

Read the rest of this entry »

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