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October 2021

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Kindertransport and The Story is Here at American Swedish Institute

Kindertransport and The Story is Here at American Swedish Institute

Photo story by Jessie Merriam The nationally touring exhibition, “Kindertransport – Rescuing Children on the Brink of War,” tells the story of the nations and individuals involved in the rescue effort that brought approximately 10,000 Jewish children from Nazi Germany to Great Britain and other countries,including Sweden, between 1938 and 1939 (approximately between Kristallnacht and the outbreak of war in Europe). Upstairs in the museum, the American Swedish Institute brings the story home, following three boyswho eventually came to Minnesota through the Kindertransport program,despite the US’s restrictive immigration policies at the time. The exhibit is personal--documenting the escalation of violence on the streets and in schools, tormented decisions and goodbyes, letters between children and parents, the fates of parents and remaining siblings, the ID tags worn around the necks of traveling children, stories of both difficult and caring placements abroad, and strained post-war reconnections. But it is also a story of nations and their politics around immigration, and how small groups of advocates failed to sway the US Congress into accepting children fleeing the Nazis (above the conservative Depression-era immigration quotas of the time). The consequences are palpable, and seem to reach from the past to shake us by the shoulders. “The Story is Here” exhibit ends with tributes to the present-day families and passed-down creative passions of the MinnesotanKindertransport survivors. But the poetry of Siegfried Lindenbaum, oneof these survivors, poigniantly carries the strain of incomplete belonging that immigrants still face, asking us as viewers to consider our own roles aswanderers and welcomers.

Pledge to Vote!  Make Your Plan Today!

Pledge to Vote! Make Your Plan Today!

The sixth in a series of articles about the 2021 Municipal Elections brought to you by the League of Women Voters Minneapolis. Election Day is November 2, 2021. Do you have your plan to vote? You want to vote in the November Minneapolis local election! Your city is important to you. You care about racial justice, housing, police reform, education, the environment, public transportation, parks and who is elected Mayor! Did you know that you are more likely to actually cast a ballot if you make a concrete plan to vote? How do you make a plan? Follow these simple steps: Be sure you are registered at your current address. In Minnesota, you can register to vote online, by mail or in person at your polling site. Pre-registering online and by mail must be done by October 12. Or you can register in person at a local early voting center or Election Day polling place.  If you are registered to vote at your current address, you do not need to bring an ID. If you need to register at your polling place site, you’ll need to bring an ID or other proof of residence to vote https://www.sos.state.mn.us/elections-voting/register-to-vote/register-on-election-day/. Not sure if you’re currently registered or want to register online? Visit www.mnvotes.org. Decide when you want to vote. Minnesotans have been voting absentee for over 75 years. Since 2014, Minnesotans have been able to cast an absentee ballot without a specific reason. The popularity of early voting in Minnesota has grown in each election since this change took effect. To vote early by mail: Request your absentee ballot no later than October 19th, fill it out and return it right away, either through the mail or to your local election office. Ballots must be received by November 2. Request and track your ballot at www.mnvotes.org. To vote early go to Minneapolis Election & Voter Services, 980 Hennepin Ave. E. Early in-person voting begins September 17 and is open through 5 p.m. [...]

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Movie Corner: Coda

Movie Corner: Coda

Vendome Pictures (2021) ★★★★★ By HOWARD MCQUITTER II Official film poster, Apple TV+           What can I say about this motion picture that is "art- house", perhaps, yet rings to me to be one of the best films since the 2021 Oscars? CODA (the 2021 story) is the precise literary work by both the director and screenwriter: Sian Heder. She tells a story of one family of deaf members except for the daughter, Ruby Rossi (Emilia Jones), in a small fishing town (set in Massachusetts) where the family makes their living by catching and selling fish from a boat.          A superb performance by Emilia Jones and fine performances by the supporting cast: Marlee Matlin (won best actress for Children of a Lesser God , a theme centering on deaf people) as Ruby’s mother; Troy Kotsur (Frank Rossi) as Ruby’s father; and Daniel Durant (Leo Rossi) as her brother. Although Ruby is the only non- deaf person, she is the interpreter for Frank and Leo on the fishing boat. As one can see, making a living by fishing is often drudgery, intertwined with buyers trying to undercut on sales. There is a strong sense the fishermen are dissatisfied with their pay.          But Ruby attends high school where she gets teased and harassed by other kids. (CODA stands for "child of deaf adults".) She decides to join the school choir where she’s getting notice from her no-nonsense music teacher, Bernardo Villalobos (Eugenio Derbez). The teacher pairs her up with a shy boy, Miles (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) for a duet. The two are awkward at first, but after several tries at the music, a love interest develops. Ruby tries to tell her family her real interest is singing; in turn her mother seems to be most in opposition to her daughter's new career.       CODA is not sappy, however. It's [...]

Open Eye Theatre presents The Red Shoes

Open Eye Theatre presents The Red Shoes

Open Eye Theatre presents THE RED SHOESOctober 14 - 31, 2021The critically-acclaimed film noir fairytale returns after a 19-month hiatus in a newly expanded version!  THE RED SHOES takes its title from a classic Hans Christian Anderson story of a young girl and a pair of red shoes, and thrillingly re-imagines it as a retro-urban fairytale. This revised version further explores elements of detective fiction, multiple personality, and psychological mystery. Visit openeyetheatre.org for more information and tickets https://www.openeyetheatre.org/

Naloxone Shortage: What’s Happening and What YOU Need to Know

Naloxone Shortage: What’s Happening and What YOU Need to Know

By TINA MONJE Despite spiking overdose deaths, the nation’s grassroots harm reduction organizations were notified this spring that Pfizer, their primary supplier of affordable, single-dose injectable naloxone (i.e. Narcan), would temporarily halt production. Pfizer has declined to provide information with major news sources, except that this halt has nothing to do with COVID-19 vaccines, and that production will resume in February. SHRS Linkage to Care Coordinator Marissa Bonnie implementing a community naloxone station in South Minneapolis. Photo by Emily Shippee Of the many naloxone producers, Pfizer is the only one who sells the product at an affordable rate. In 2012, the company entered into an agreement with a nation-wide buyers’ club consisting of community harm reduction organizations in an effort to get the opioid overdose reversal drug into the hands of those most likely to respond to overdose - people who use drugs (PWUD). Minneapolis-based Southside Harm Reduction Services (SHRS) is one of the many buyers’ club members who rely on Pfizer’s accessibility. Of the syringe services programs (SSP’s) in Minnesota, SHRS purchases and distributes the largest quantity. SHRS Founder and Executive Director Jack Martin reports that, between June 2020 and 2021 alone, they distributed at least 80,000 doses to PWUD either directly, or through other SSPs, organizations, and individuals. While naloxone is theoretically abundant, a single dose from other producers can run about $20 each, an infeasible price for PWUD, and for the underfunded or underground entities who serve them. “There’s enough naloxone in the world,” says Martin. “We don’t need to be in a situation where we’re having to deny people naloxone.” Martin suggests that other pharmaceutical companies either cannot or simply will not offer it at competitive prices. For now, [...]

Library News

Library News

By Carz Nelson All information listed here is accurate as of September 15, 2021. For the most recent information, check out the library website at www.hclib.org. INDIGENOUS PEOPLES DAY COMMUNITY READ- THE SEED KEEPER Celebrate Indigenous Peoples Day by joining Franklin Library’s Community Read! Read The Seed Keeper on your own, then join author Diane Wilson to discuss the book in a live, virtual event on Monday, October 11 at 7:00-8:00 PM. A limited number of free copies of the book are available at Franklin Library. For more information, visit www.hclib.org/events. FREE SUPPLIES FOR JOB HUNTERS Franklin Library is distributing a limited number of job resource bags.  They are free for anyone currently looking for a job. The bags have a folder, notebook, pen, flash drive, and more. FRANKLIN LIBRARY HOURS Monday ClosedTuesday 9 AM to 5 PMWednesday 9 AM to 5 PMThursday 12 Noon to 8 PMFriday 9 AM to 5 PMSaturday 9 AM to 5 PMSunday 12 Noon to 5 PM LIBRARY SERVICE AND COVID PRECAUTIONS Everyone must wear a mask in the library and in all county buildings. Children under five years old are exempt. People who tested positive for COVID 19 or who are experiencing symptoms should not enter the library. Franklin Library is open for regular service, including book check out, holds pick up, and walk-in computer use. There’s no limit on the time people can spend inside the library. COFFEE & CONVERSATIONS Franklin Library hosts a monthly program outdoors in front of the library. Neighbors and community members can stop by for free coffee and doughnuts. It’s the perfect time to chat with library staff. Weather permitting, meetings are on the second Fridays of the month at 10am-12 noon. Upcoming dates are October 8, November 12, and December 10. READING SUGGESTIONS Looking for a good book to read? You could ask a librarian. At hclib.org, towards the bottom of the page, you’ll find the link, Ask us for [...]

Letter to the Editor: Responding to “Ebenezer Land”

Public Housing: The Best-Kept Secret I think it's worth noting that the summary of the article on public housing that you quoted from us was "The best-kept secret about public housing is that most of it actually provides decent, affordable housing to many people. Properly run, it remains one of the best options for housing the poor." The quote you selected describes not something intrinsic to public housing, but what happens when it is designed and funded in a cynical manner by people who would like to see it fail. I encourage readers to explore the full article. shelterforce.org/1994/09/01/public-housing-what-went-wrong/ Miriam Axel-Lute CEO/Editor-in-Chief Shelterforce

Bridge Fest

Bridge Fest

By CARZ NELSON Bridge Fest: Celebrating the New 24th Street Foot Bridge Musicians on the bridge Strolling on the bridgeHanging out on the bridgeTrying out the new bridgePhotographer tests the view, with a photograph of the old view to his right hanging on the new fence. The New Viewphotographs by Carz Nelson On August 19, MNDot had a party to celebrate the new 24th Street pedestrian bridge over 35W. The old bridge was removed for the 35W upgrade, which was recently completed. People in the neighborhood were significantly inconvenienced when the bridge was removed. Pedestrians faced a four-block detour to cross 35W at Franklin Avenue or 26th Street. The completion of the new bridge was an occasion to celebrate. Turns out, MNDot knows how to throw a good party. There were artists, performers, and musicians to entertain the crowd gathered on the bridge. Free ice cream was the perfect treat for a summer evening. The old bridge was popular with local photographers because it arced high in the air and provided an excellent view of the downtown skyline. The new bridge is closer to street grade. There was some concern that the new view might not make as good pictures. Many photographers showed up for Bridgefest to try out the new angle for themselves. They discovered that the new bridge is a fine place to shoot pictures of the downtown skyline after all. The celebration spilled off the bridge and into the neighborhoods as groups like Open Eye Theater and Hennepin County Historical Society featured entertainment and activities. Bridgefest recognized not only the new bridge, but also the rejoining of two neighborhoods.

Cooking From Your Garden with Kelly Shay

Cooking From Your Garden with Kelly Shay

by Michelle Shaw Join us for our next Edible Boulevards cooking class on Thursday, October 28 from 5:00-6:30pm via Zoom! Kelly Shay from Harmonious World will teach us how to make Cozy Autumn Lentil Stew (ingredients list will be posted on our Facebook page a week before the event - purchase ingredients in advance to cook your supper with us that evening). Bring someone into the kitchen with you, or come on your own. The first 5 participants whopre-register from the Southside of Minneapolis by noon on October 24 will get a $10 gift card for the Seward Co-op. Join our Minneapolis Edible Boulevards Facebook group, and scroll down to the October 28 event. There you’ll find the preregistration for Cooking from Your Garden with Kelly Shay. Please help us spread the word! If you miss out in person, you’ll be able to watch the recording on our Minneapolis Edible Boulevards Facebook page. If you have any questions, send us a message on our Facebook page. We can’t wait to cook and grow with you! Photos provided by Edible Boulevards

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