NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Wednesday October 20th 2021

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September Random alley News

September Random alley News

By Lindsey Fenner and Laura Hulscher All the Ward 6 and Ward 9 City Council Candidates on the Ballot in November: Candidates for City of Minneapolis elections had an August 10 deadline to file to be on the November ballot. Candidates for Ward 6 City Council (which includes Ventura Village and Phillips West in the Phillips neighborhood: Jamal Osman (incumbent) and A. Bihi. Candidates for Ward 9 City Council (which includes East Phillips and Midtown Phillips in the Phillips Neighborhood): Mickey Moore, Yussuf Haji, Brenda Short, Ross Tenneson, Carmen Means, Jason Chavez, Alfred "AJ" Flowers Jr., and Jon Randall Denison. Look for a City Council candidate questionnaire in upcoming editions of the alley! Long Vacant 628 East Franklin to Be Developed into Affordable Housing: City of Lakes Community Land Trust (CLCLT) and Hope Community have entered into an agreement with the City of Minneapolis to turn the historic vacant building at 628 East Franklin Avenue into perpetually affordable housing. The building has been vacant for over 20 years, as various redevelopment plans have fallen through. The plan submitted by CLCLT in partnership with Hope Community will renovate the gutted building into seven condo units: six 3-bed, 2-bath units and one 1-bed, 1-bath unit, affordable to households at or below 60% Area Median Income. Hope Community operates over 200 affordable housing units in the Phillips neighborhood, including the nearby South Quarter affordable housing community at Franklin and Portland.  Drop In Behavioral Health Center Now Open at 1800 Chicago: Hennepin County’s new Behavioral Health Clinic is open to anyone 18 and older needing help with mental health or substance use. Services include urgent care and physical screening; Housing, cash and food support; and Mental health and substance use services such as Mental health screening and diagnostic assessmentsComprehensive screening for addiction disordersCase management and care [...]

Edible Boulevards

Edible Boulevards

By MICHELLE SHAW Join us for our Edible Boulevards cooking classes! Our class will help you utilize the harvest from your own garden to create simple, delicious summer and autumn recipes. We were delighted to have Appetite for Change teach our first two classes, and we’re excited to welcome Kelly Shay, founder of Harmonious World, to lead our September and October classes. You’ll learn about the nutritional value of the produce in each recipe, and when the class is over, you will have made that evening’s meal for yourself and your family. Invite your partner, a friend, or your kids to the Zoom class, and cook the meal together! Here’s what we have in store for you: Thursday, September 30 with Kelly Shay: Vegetable Basil Stir-fry w/ Quinoa and a Side Salad -- 5:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.Thursday, October 28 with Kelly Shay: Cozy Autumn Lentil Stew -- 5:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. Register in advance: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMscOCprz8vGtdw0iHhiRISE1BfEDky87Sv Edible Boulevards is an initiative focused on making fresh produce accessible in every Minneapolis neighborhood, starting with Green Zone neighborhoods, which have suffered environmental injustice and food apartheid policies for decades. Our garden sites get tested for lead, because children in Green Zone neighborhoods typically experience higher blood lead levels. We teach participants self-sustainability in gardening, so that they can share their skills with neighbors, friends and family, and grow their own food together. We are partnered with the East Phillips Improvement Coalition (EPIC) and have funding to build several gardens for residents of East Phillips. Please contact minneapolisedibleboulevards@gmail.com if you’d like an application. If you’re interested, and don’t live in East Phillips, we still welcome you to attend our free cooking classes. The first five people from South Minneapolis who pre-register will get a $10 Seward [...]

Images from Line 3, Summer 2021

Images from Line 3, Summer 2021

By K. Flo Razowsky @FloWalksFree Photo story as it appears in the September issue of the alley 7/19/2021On the way to Line 3, to assert treaty rights and oppose the destruction caused by Canadian-owned private corporation Enbridge, as it clear-cuts the forests and drills under the rivers, to build the pipeline that will carry oil for overseas sales. Already many of the drilling sites along the rivers have caused frac-outs - polluting the water with chemicals 7/19/2021The six women chained during this action were arrested along with myself, on site as media. #ShellRiverSeven Women Horse Nation Riders going to support the Water Walkers. Coming from Pine River Crossing to Itasca, headwaters of the Mississippi, and drilling site of Enbridge’s Line 3 pipeline. #RedRoadToDC at the sacred Shell River. Nations gathering from all directions for the water with #HorseNations to #StopLine3 It’s not about taking away access to livelihood, it’s about figuring out how to meet our needs without devastating the planet, and finally respecting the rights and sacred spaces of the original caretakers of these places. Firelight, a resistance camp at the headwaters of the Mississippi, where Enbridge drilling has caused multiple frac-outs: “...when drilling fluid penetrates fractured bedrock, or seeps or flows into the rock and sand that surrounds the bedrock and travels toward the Earth's surface. A frac-out frequently occurs as the result of excessive down-hole pressure caused by a poor choice of drilling fluids or poor drilling practices.” https://www.trenchlesspedia.com/definition/2186/frac-out

East Phillips Urban Farm Faces Crucial City Council Vote in August

East Phillips Urban Farm Faces Crucial City Council Vote in August

By LINDSEY FENNER The future of the East Phillips Urban Farm will reach a crucial turning point in August when the Minneapolis City Council will hear a staff report on the future of the City’s Public Works expansion at the Roof Depot site at Longfellow and 28th Street, and vote on an Environmental Assessment Worksheet (EAW). An EAW is a short document that reports on the facts of a project and determines the need for a further review called an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). At the end of April, the City Council approved a staff directive that paused the City’s Public Works expansion at the Roof Depot site, with a required report at the City Council Committee of the Whole meeting on Thursday, August 5. The report will include information on the financial and operational impact of ending the Public Works expansion project and recommendations for selling the property to community groups.The Public Works expansion, if it went forward, would increase car and truck emissions in a neighborhood already overburdened with pollution and accompanying health conditions like asthma. Neighbors, community members, and allies have been fighting for another vision of the Roof Depot site, the East Phillips Urban Farm. The community project would include urban agriculture, affordable housing, job training, and a small business incubator. The community group organized around this vision, the East Phillips Neighborhood Institute, has an active lawsuit against the City of Minneapolis to stop the Public Works expansion, is working on securing funding and a buyer for the property, and has been holding workshops with business owners, community groups, and tenants interested in renting space within the 230,000 sq.ft. Roof Depot. The East Phillips Neighborhood Institute (EPNI) hosted a workshop with local businesses and community organizations such as Migizi, Gandhi Mahal, Little Earth, and more to envision a business model for the future East Phillips Indoor [...]

Free Native Pollinator Plants! Plantas Polinizadores Nativas Gratuitos!

Free Native Pollinator Plants! Plantas Polinizadores Nativas Gratuitos!

Corcoran Pollinator Project has free native plants and pollinator gardening resources to share with Phillips residents. For more info check out corcoranpollinatorproject.org or email corcoranpollinatorproject@gmail.com. Corcoran Pollinator Project tiene plantas nativas y recursos de jardinería polinizadores gratuitos para compartir con los residentes de Phillips. Para obtener más información, envíe un correo electrónico a corcoranpollinatorproject@ gmail.com.

Vote, Then Take a Hike!

Vote, Then Take a Hike!

Vote, Then Take a Hike Part 3 in a series of articles about the 2021 municipal elections, brought to you by the League of Women Voters of Minneapolis When did you last enjoy a park? Did you have a picnic? Did you watch a little league game or take a knitting class? Minneapolis parks offer any activities a creative mind can imagine. The many facets of the park system are overseen by nine commissioners elected by YOU. One position for each of six park districts and three at-large positions are up for election this fall.  Meeting monthly, these commissioners are responsible for maintaining park properties, developing new sites to equitably serve residents’ needs, and proposing policies that govern the use and safety of the 180 park properties, 55 miles of parkways, 12 formal gardens, seven golf courses, and 49 recreation centers in our city. They also appoint the superintendent who implements the board policies, overseeing the budget and staff of more than 600 employees.  Perhaps you’ll want to know about the improvements planned for your neighborhood park, or maybe you want to learn about plans for the Upper Harbor Terminal on the Mississippi, or how the golf courses are operated. Information is available at Minneapolisparks.org. There you can learn about your park commissioners who are hoping to have your vote. Make your voice heard by contacting them and making your plan to vote in November. ANOTHER CHOICE YOU HAVE This fall you will also be able to vote for two members of the Board of Estimate and Taxation. Board members set maximum tax levies for a variety of city and park and recreation funds. The board also reviews some department budgets and participates in the city’s debt management policy, concerned with interest rates and prudent debt levels. As a citizen, you vote for your representatives on this important oversight board. Your attention and your vote matter. .

Eat Your Leafy Greens!

Eat Your Leafy Greens!

By MARY ELLEN KALUZA Summer is in full swing, and our local farmers markets are bursting with the first produce of the season. For several weeks now, enterprising farmers with hoop houses have been supplying us with breathtaking spinach, stunning kale, lovely arugula, and delicious Hakurei turnips, with their yummy greens (a great twofer vegetable!). Fresh vegetables at the local farmers markets are almost always less expensive than in grocery stores, not to mention far more nutritious, as they haven’t languished in a far-off warehouse for weeks before reaching our refrigerators. Most vegetables start to lose nutrients the minute they are picked, and can lose 50 percent or more in less than a week. So, buying directly from the farmer who was up pre-dawn picking those leafy greens gets you the maximum goodness for your dollar. WHY EAT GREENS? Greens are probably the most nutrient packed food group. They are a great source of important minerals (iron, calcium, potassium, magnesium) and vitamins C, B, E, and K. Plus, greens have phytonutrients like beta-carotene and lutein. Lutein, for example, is shown to promote long term eye health, lowering the risk of cataracts. So, just like saving now in your 401K for retirement, eat your greens today to save your eyesight for those golden years. All of our body functions, not just our eyesight, depend on those essential nutrients. Eating greens is a smart investment in your future health. And buying at your local farmers market is a smart investment in your community. NEARBY MARKETS Four Sisters Farmers Market - 1414 E Franklin Ave, Thu 11-3Midtown Farmers Market - 3032 Minnehaha Ave S, Sat 8 - 1, Tue 3 - 7Mill City Farmers Market - 750 2nd St S, Sat 8 - 1Kingfield Farmers Market - 4005 Nicollet Avenue, Sun 8:30 - 1Farmers Market Annex - 200 E Lyndale Ave N, Sat – Sun 7 - 1Nokomis Farmers' Market, 52nd & Chicago Ave S, Wed 4 - 8 BONUS for WIC PARTICIPANTS WIC participants [...]

Random alley news

Random alley news

By LINDSEY FENNER City of Minneapolis and Hennepin County make Juneteenth an official holiday: They join a growing number of municipalities making June 19, which commemorates the end of slavery in the United States, an officially observed holiday. Because Juneteenth falls on a Saturday this year, City and County offices will be closed on Friday, June 18 in observation of the holiday.  Check hclib.org and www.minneapolisparks.org for Juneteenth celebrations and events. Free membership is coming to Quatrefoil Library: Quatrefoil Library, the community center and resource for LGBTQ+ materials at 1220 East Lake Street, is offering free membership starting June 1. Quatrefoil Library has over 30,000 books, thousands of DVDs and movies, podcasts, and countless other pieces of media. The library has been open for curbside service only during the pandemic, but will start offering in-person hours this summer. Visit their website to learn more: www.qlibrary.org. Emergency Broadband Benefit Program Now Open: The Emergency Broadband Benefit (EBB) is a new federal program designed to reduce internet costs. The program will provide discounted or free internet to many households. If you qualify, you can receive a discount of up to $50 per month towards your internet service. There are three ways to apply for the program: Online at www.GetEmergencyBroadband.orgThrough the mail by calling 833-511-0311 to get an applicationDirectly with a participating internet service provider You can also contact the Emergency Broadband Support Center hotline at 1-833-511-0311 or EBBHelp@USAC.org. Rita Ortega drops out as Ward 9 City Council candidate: The Little Earth resident and community organizer announced on her facebook page that she was ending her campaign due to medical issues. Remaining candidates seeking the Ward 9 City Council seat are: Jason Chavez, Al Flowers, Jr., Carmen Means, Mickey Moore, and Haji Yussef. Midtown Greenway crossing work this summer: [...]

A Closer Look at the Deep Winter Greenhouse going up on 15th Ave.

A Closer Look at the Deep Winter Greenhouse going up on 15th Ave.

By ELIZA SCHOLL, HECUA INTERN WITH TAMALES Y BICICLETAS A mild late fall/early winter allowed Jacqueline Zepeda (Pine and Poplar LLC, https://pineandpoplar.org/ @femmeempowermentproject) and Scheidel (Fireweed Community Woodshop https://www.fireweedwoodshop.org/) to continue work on the ridgebeam. Photo: Jose Luis Villaseñor April: Villaseñor and volunteers Bozena Scheidel and Mattie Wong affix polycarbonate to the south face of the greenhouse. Volunteers have been essential to the building of the greenhouse, exchanging their time for new skills and community. Photo by volunteer Jessie Merriam  On South 15th Avenue, half a block south of E. 28th St., Tamales y Bicicletas is building a winter greenhouse on its urban garden space. For ten years, the nonprofit has used bikes and urban farming to reduce the environmental impacts of the heavy concentration of industry on the East Phillips community.  “How do we decolonize our food systems that then leads to decolonizing our minds and bodies?” asks Jose Luis Villaseñor Rangel, the founder of Tamales y Bicicletas. “That’s always been the DNA of why we do what we do.”  The construction of a winter greenhouse is Tamales y Bicicletas’ latest project. Daniel Handeen, a professor of architecture and a Research Fellow at the Center for Sustainable Building Research at the University of Minnesota who designed this greenhouse model, was looking for a way to grow crops through the winter with minimal additional heating inputs. The goal was to generate as little carbon dioxide output as possible. Handeen’s design is being constructed by Tamales y Bicicletas and by Appetite for Change on Minneapolis’ north side.  Handeen and Villaseñor affix glazing. The flexible plastic is double walled and will let sun in without letting as much heat out as traditional greenhouse plastics. Photos: Jessie Merriam “The project came [...]

Neighbors Rally for Environmental Justice in East Phillips

Neighbors Rally for Environmental Justice in East Phillips

By STEVE SANDBERG AND KAREN CLARK, EAST PHILLIPS NEIGHBORHOOD INSTITUTE BOARD MEMBERS (Photo By: MICAH SPIELER-SANDBERG) On Sunday March 7, supporters of the East Phillips Indoor Urban Farm Project gathered atop the Greenway bike path‘s Martin Olav Sabo Bridge in East Phillips Neighborhood. Organized with the help of the local chapter of Global Shapers, an estimated 200+ socially distanced supporters rallied at 1PM to display protest banners over Hwy 55 and to hear speakers. On this unseasonably warm 58 degree Sunday afternoon, the bridge was filled with many neighbors -- from babies to elders; East Phillips Neighborhood Institute (EPNI) organizers; Little Earth of United Tribes drummers and singers; American Indian Movement carriers of the AIM Flag; numerous racial and environmental justice organizational allies; four candidates for Minneapolis’ 9th Ward City Council’s 2021 election race; all welcomed by the rousing sound of local sousaphone-powered band--the Brass Messengers. The rally was called 1) to urgently protest and stop the City of Minneapolis’ dangerous proposal to consolidate their city-wide Public Works storage and distribution plants into East Phillip Neighborhood and 2) to instead strongly promote our community-led alternative to save the huge former Roof Depot warehouse from city demolition and to convert it into an indoor urban farm with affordable housing, good jobs and small business opportunities, BY and FOR the neighborhood. Urgency arises from the March 25 deadline for public comments on the city’s recently published “Environmental Assessment Worksheet” (EAW). It is weak, deeply flawed and totally fails to address the serious public health dangers to residents that the city’s proposed Public Works project would impose on this majority people-of-color, Native American and very low-income neighborhood. Our residents are already overburdened with toxic pollution-related racial health [...]