NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Wednesday October 20th 2021

Keep citizen journalism alive!

Donatebutton_narrow

Sections

Archives

‘Food’ Archives

Cooking From Your Garden with Kelly Shay

Cooking From Your Garden with Kelly Shay

by Michelle Shaw Join us for our next Edible Boulevards cooking class on Thursday, October 28 from 5:00-6:30pm via Zoom! Kelly Shay from Harmonious World will teach us how to make Cozy Autumn Lentil Stew (ingredients list will be posted on our Facebook page a week before the event - purchase ingredients in advance to cook your supper with us that evening). Bring someone into the kitchen with you, or come on your own. The first 5 participants whopre-register from the Southside of Minneapolis by noon on October 24 will get a $10 gift card for the Seward Co-op. Join our Minneapolis Edible Boulevards Facebook group, and scroll down to the October 28 event. There you’ll find the preregistration for Cooking from Your Garden with Kelly Shay. Please help us spread the word! If you miss out in person, you’ll be able to watch the recording on our Minneapolis Edible Boulevards Facebook page. If you have any questions, send us a message on our Facebook page. We can’t wait to cook and grow with you! Photos provided by Edible Boulevards

Edible Boulevards

Edible Boulevards

By MICHELLE SHAW Join us for our Edible Boulevards cooking classes! Our class will help you utilize the harvest from your own garden to create simple, delicious summer and autumn recipes. We were delighted to have Appetite for Change teach our first two classes, and we’re excited to welcome Kelly Shay, founder of Harmonious World, to lead our September and October classes. You’ll learn about the nutritional value of the produce in each recipe, and when the class is over, you will have made that evening’s meal for yourself and your family. Invite your partner, a friend, or your kids to the Zoom class, and cook the meal together! Here’s what we have in store for you: Thursday, September 30 with Kelly Shay: Vegetable Basil Stir-fry w/ Quinoa and a Side Salad -- 5:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.Thursday, October 28 with Kelly Shay: Cozy Autumn Lentil Stew -- 5:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. Register in advance: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMscOCprz8vGtdw0iHhiRISE1BfEDky87Sv Edible Boulevards is an initiative focused on making fresh produce accessible in every Minneapolis neighborhood, starting with Green Zone neighborhoods, which have suffered environmental injustice and food apartheid policies for decades. Our garden sites get tested for lead, because children in Green Zone neighborhoods typically experience higher blood lead levels. We teach participants self-sustainability in gardening, so that they can share their skills with neighbors, friends and family, and grow their own food together. We are partnered with the East Phillips Improvement Coalition (EPIC) and have funding to build several gardens for residents of East Phillips. Please contact minneapolisedibleboulevards@gmail.com if you’d like an application. If you’re interested, and don’t live in East Phillips, we still welcome you to attend our free cooking classes. The first five people from South Minneapolis who pre-register will get a $10 Seward [...]

Eat Your Leafy Greens!

Eat Your Leafy Greens!

By MARY ELLEN KALUZA Summer is in full swing, and our local farmers markets are bursting with the first produce of the season. For several weeks now, enterprising farmers with hoop houses have been supplying us with breathtaking spinach, stunning kale, lovely arugula, and delicious Hakurei turnips, with their yummy greens (a great twofer vegetable!). Fresh vegetables at the local farmers markets are almost always less expensive than in grocery stores, not to mention far more nutritious, as they haven’t languished in a far-off warehouse for weeks before reaching our refrigerators. Most vegetables start to lose nutrients the minute they are picked, and can lose 50 percent or more in less than a week. So, buying directly from the farmer who was up pre-dawn picking those leafy greens gets you the maximum goodness for your dollar. WHY EAT GREENS? Greens are probably the most nutrient packed food group. They are a great source of important minerals (iron, calcium, potassium, magnesium) and vitamins C, B, E, and K. Plus, greens have phytonutrients like beta-carotene and lutein. Lutein, for example, is shown to promote long term eye health, lowering the risk of cataracts. So, just like saving now in your 401K for retirement, eat your greens today to save your eyesight for those golden years. All of our body functions, not just our eyesight, depend on those essential nutrients. Eating greens is a smart investment in your future health. And buying at your local farmers market is a smart investment in your community. NEARBY MARKETS Four Sisters Farmers Market - 1414 E Franklin Ave, Thu 11-3Midtown Farmers Market - 3032 Minnehaha Ave S, Sat 8 - 1, Tue 3 - 7Mill City Farmers Market - 750 2nd St S, Sat 8 - 1Kingfield Farmers Market - 4005 Nicollet Avenue, Sun 8:30 - 1Farmers Market Annex - 200 E Lyndale Ave N, Sat – Sun 7 - 1Nokomis Farmers' Market, 52nd & Chicago Ave S, Wed 4 - 8 BONUS for WIC PARTICIPANTS WIC participants [...]

Free Meals and Snacks for Kids

Free Meals and Snacks for Kids

En la escuela y en otros sitios Comidas escolares nutritivas gratuitas/Iskuulada iyo meelo kaleba  For more free meals for kids, download the “Free Meals for Kids” app on your smartphone!  East Phillips Park Cultural and Community Center 2307 17th Ave S  •Tuesdays and Thursdays, June 15-August 12 •Meal Bags will be provided from 5:00 PM- 6:00 PM  Little Earth Residents Association (LERA) 2495 18th Avenue South  •Tuesdays and Fridays, July 2-August 13 •Meal bags will be provided from 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM  Stewart Park 2700 12th Ave S  • This summer food services program provides children nutritious meals during summer vacation (Monday through Friday) on behalf of the Minneapolis School District. It is free to all children aged 18 and younger.  • Monday – Friday, 1-2PM: snack; 5-6PM: dinner  Weekly Meal Boxes Minneapolis Public Schools South High3131 S 19th Ave, 55407 Door 20, Off of 21st Ave South •Food boxes will contain 7 breakfasts and 7 lunches. Monday- Friday, 10am - 3pm Street Eats Food Truck, Minneapolis Public Schools •Hope Academy, 2300 Chicago Ave S: Wednesdays, 12PM-12:30PM •Waite House, 2323 11th Ave: Fridays, 11:40AM-12:10PM Franklin Library 1314 E Franklin Ave •Youth snacks:Thursdays 2:30-3:30 p.m. Hosmer Library 347 E 36th St •Snacks for kids always available during open hours •Cold Boxed Lunch: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday: 10:50-11:10AM •Hot Lunch: Wednesday 1:20-1:40 FREE MEALS FOR KIDS aplicación móvil/mobile app Free Nutritious Meals For Kids 18 And Under Only a click away, the Free Meals for Kids mobile app will help families and kids find free meals at schools and other sites across Minnesota during COVID-19. How it works: 1. Download the Free Meals for Kids app to your cell phone. 2. Use the app to find the nearest [...]

Cover Crop Seeds

Cover Crop Seeds

RAISE YOUR VOICE By PETER MOLENAAR Peter Molenaar From time to time, readers of the alley are reminded that Wendell Phillips, our neighborhood’s namesake, was an abolitionist. I will assert here that, were he still alive, he would be opposed to the ongoing oppression of the Palestinian people. Now days, this opposition to all forms of oppression circulates via this paper in surrounding communities, including the Land Stewardship Project (LSP) which maintains an office in the Powderhorn Neighborhood. The LSP is splendidly adept at mingling strains of progressive rural thought with the corresponding urban strains. Our nation’s soil health is an overriding issue for the LSP. Why bother? Well, an estimated 1/3 of our topsoil has already washed away. The applied math does not bode well. But hey, just add more chemicals… right? Wrong. Actually, the world’s supply of phosphate is nearing exhaustion. (Note: President Biden has initiated a supply chain analysis for all vital commodities.) Moreover, cover crops are the key to a â€˜regenerative agriculture’ which is poised to sequester enough carbon to seriously stem the tide of climate catastrophe. However, any mandate that our farmers comply with this strategy will be deemed by â€œconservatives” and well armed â€œpatriots" to be a "socialist tyranny”. So, seemingly light years ahead of most Republicans, Biden has proposed to compensate farmers who convert. However, another reminder: cover crops are grown from seeds (!) which ideally would exist ahead of time (i.e., prior to launching the full scale program, our government must contract for an adequate initial supply)… But oh, gosh golly, would not such thoughtful planning constitute yet another â€œtyranny”? â€œMarket forces” will handle the matter in due time. Right? Note: Cargill Inc., one of the world’s largest [...]

A Closer Look at the Deep Winter Greenhouse going up on 15th Ave.

A Closer Look at the Deep Winter Greenhouse going up on 15th Ave.

By ELIZA SCHOLL, HECUA INTERN WITH TAMALES Y BICICLETAS A mild late fall/early winter allowed Jacqueline Zepeda (Pine and Poplar LLC, https://pineandpoplar.org/ @femmeempowermentproject) and Scheidel (Fireweed Community Woodshop https://www.fireweedwoodshop.org/) to continue work on the ridgebeam. Photo: Jose Luis Villaseñor April: Villaseñor and volunteers Bozena Scheidel and Mattie Wong affix polycarbonate to the south face of the greenhouse. Volunteers have been essential to the building of the greenhouse, exchanging their time for new skills and community. Photo by volunteer Jessie Merriam  On South 15th Avenue, half a block south of E. 28th St., Tamales y Bicicletas is building a winter greenhouse on its urban garden space. For ten years, the nonprofit has used bikes and urban farming to reduce the environmental impacts of the heavy concentration of industry on the East Phillips community.  “How do we decolonize our food systems that then leads to decolonizing our minds and bodies?” asks Jose Luis Villaseñor Rangel, the founder of Tamales y Bicicletas. “That’s always been the DNA of why we do what we do.”  The construction of a winter greenhouse is Tamales y Bicicletas’ latest project. Daniel Handeen, a professor of architecture and a Research Fellow at the Center for Sustainable Building Research at the University of Minnesota who designed this greenhouse model, was looking for a way to grow crops through the winter with minimal additional heating inputs. The goal was to generate as little carbon dioxide output as possible. Handeen’s design is being constructed by Tamales y Bicicletas and by Appetite for Change on Minneapolis’ north side.  Handeen and Villaseñor affix glazing. The flexible plastic is double walled and will let sun in without letting as much heat out as traditional greenhouse plastics. Photos: Jessie Merriam “The project came [...]

BEANS – Good for the Earth, Good for You, Good for Your Wallet

BEANS – Good for the Earth, Good for You, Good for Your Wallet

By MARY ELLEN KALUZA The Scarlet Runner Bean, native to the highlands of Mexico and Central America, is not only delicious and nutritious, it is lovely like a precious stone. The bright red flowers of the Scarlet Runner attract hummingbirds and butterflies. The pictured beans were grown right here in Phillips. World population is growing by 3 billion people over the next 40 – 50 years, and with it is a growing demand for beef. Over the past 60 years, global production of cattle meat has grown over 40%. Cattle grazing accounts for 80% of the loss of Amazon forests alone. One acre devoted to beef produces just 15.6 pounds of protein. One pound of beef needs 1800 gallons of water to get to our table. Additionally, and alarmingly, all meat production accounts for 14.5% of greenhouse gas emissions, with beef taking in the lead at 2/3 of that. We need protein for repair and growth of cells, fighting disease, moving oxygen in our blood, and more. Meat is a good source of protein. But, meat isn’t the only source of protein. Enter dried beans, also known as pulses. Pulses are also a good source of protein. One acre of pulse crops can produce 94 pounds of protein, and use 1/10 of the water beef needs. Other important nutritional comparisons, to continue picking on beef: A 5-ounce steak has 300 calories, 44 grams of protein, 120 milligrams of cholesterol, 12 grams of fat (much of it is saturated fat), no carbohydrates, and no fiber. A cup of pinto beans has 265 calories, 15 grams of protein, no cholesterol, 1 gram of fat (which is polyunsaturated), 26 grams of complex carbohydrates, and 15 grams of dietary fiber. Beans have more potassium and less sodium. Both beef and beans have iron, but we absorb plant-based iron more efficiently. While beef provides more protein per ounce, we also get protein from other foods: dairy, grains, nuts, vegetables, and even fruits. Most Americans consume twice the protein they need. Pulses are members [...]

Let’s Get This Garden Started!

Let’s Get This Garden Started!

By MARY ELLEN KALUZA Dreaming of spring and summer... (illustrations by Jessie Merriam, photos by Mary Ellen Kaluza of her garden) March in Minnesota. The days are noticeably longer. We are longing to have dirt under our nails. But isn't it too early? There's still snow on the ground. It's the perfect time to get the garden started. First: Plan your garden Know your space—how much sun do you get in the different areas? Put your parka on and go outside. Imagine the trees are fully leafed-out and the sun moving high across the sky. Most vegetables need a lot of sun. Leafy greens can do well in more shaded areas and may actually produce larger leaves valiantly trying to absorb as much sunlight as possible. Save the sunniest areas for tomatoes, peppers, and other fruiting plants. Carrots and other root vegetables will tolerate some shade. Make your wish list, then pare it down to fit your space. Map out your garden with sun and plant size in mind. Buy your seeds! Thinking about how the light will be when the leaves come out and the sun is in it's summer trajectory helps know where to put certain plants. Preparing your soil and planning climbing plants, root crops, and herbs saves headaches down the road! Second: Start your seeds Starting plants from seed is a great way to save money. Seeds will stay viable for a few years and store easily in a glass jar in the fridge. You can get dozens of plants out of a $2 - $3 packet.  A lot of vegetables can be seeded directly into the soil. Read the seed packets for planting times and instructions. In short growing seasons, like Minnesota, many plants must be started inside a month or two before they can go outside. Save clear plastic clamshell packaging from lettuce or berries to start your seeds.You can control the moisture and warmth with the lid. Save other plastic tubs – yogurt, sour cream, anything you can punch drain holes into for transplanting the little starts into later [...]

East Phillips Urban Farm Gets Much Needed Support from Council Vice-President Jenkins

East Phillips Urban Farm Gets Much Needed Support from Council Vice-President Jenkins

By Grace Pastoor, East Phillips Neighborhood Institute Staff Minneapolis City Council Vice-President Andrea Jenkins has come out in support of the East Phillips Neighborhood Institute’s urban farm project. Jenkins initially voted for work on the City’s Hiawatha Campus Expansion Project to continue but, she said, changed her mind due to COVID and other concerns. “2020 happened,” Vice-President Jenkins said on the SouthSide Mpls podcast. “Given the fact that there’s a perception in the community that this facility would increase the amount of pollution in that area...given what we know about the Coronavirus, given what we know about how Native communities have had land stolen, I think this provides us, the City of Minneapolis, an opportunity to say ‘Community: We hear you.’” Jenkins, along with other local leaders, restated her support in a virtual event January 16. The event featured short speeches by Jenkins, Senator Omar Fateh, Senator Patricia Torres Rey, and more. “After the effects of the Coronavirus that really deeply uncovered the systemic issues of racism in our society, and then the subsequent murder of George Floyd, I declared racism as a public health crisis,” Jenkins said. The East Phillips Urban Farm project is the neighborhood group’s alternative to the City of Minneapolis’ Hiawatha Campus Expansion Project. The City’s project would bring further pollution and environmental injustice to the diverse East Phillips neighborhood. “I see this project as a way to mitigate some of those harms and begin to really address the inequities that have been foisted upon our communities of color, particularly in the East Phillips neighborhood,” Jenkins said. “I can’t in good conscience continue to support unsustainable, unimaginable policies that continue to disrupt our communities.” What can YOU do? Check out our website at: [...]

Cultural Wellness Center

Cultural Wellness Center

 Page 1 of 4  1  2  3  4 »