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Saturday June 23rd 2018

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Food Obsession: B.S.T.P.

by Jane Thomson

Bring Something To Pass – a potluck.

The first recipe is from my daughter Rose. Some years ago, when she was a teenager, I was out of the kitchen for long periods of time, and not hanging over her telling what to do. She made some cookies that won a prize at the Sherburne County Fair (we lived in Elk River at the time). Of course, I have kidded her endlessly about the time she made pancakes on a warming tray and wondered why they were taking so long to get done.

This recipe is from her fairly recently, in her adult years. These days I have more to learn from Rose than to teach her.

CURRIED TUNA SALAD – about 8 or 10 potluck side-dish servings
2 cans tuna packed in water
1 red bell pepper
¾ of a purple onion
1 apple
2 stalks celery
2 cloves garlic
2 tablespoons of curry powder
1 teaspoon of salt
1 tsp. black pepper
1 teaspoon honey or sugar
½ teaspoon dried dill
¼ cup mayonnaise
¼ teaspoon cinnamon
1 tablespoon vinegar, preferably balsamic
dash of cumin

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May 2011 Daves’ Dumpster

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Searching – A Serial Novelle Chapter 26: “Little Do We Know”

By Patrick Cabello Hansel

Little did Angel know that the man driving the delivery van was not the flower lady’s son. He did not know what her son looked like, and he could not have known that he had been carjacked a few minutes before. And so when the man honked the horn in front of the shop and motioned impatiently for Angel to climb in, Angel did exactly that.

“So you need a ride, huh?” the man asked. He was crouched over the steering wheel, his hooded grey sweatshirt pulled tight over his ears.  Angel thought he smelled something strange in the man.

“Yes, thank you so much,” Angel replied. He noticed that although the heater was on full blast, he still felt chilled. Down to his bones cold. The van turned onto 28th Street and headed west, the snow seeming to blow in from all directions of the compass at once.

“Is that a present for your lady?” he asked.

“No, it’s for my parents,” Angel said

“What’d you get ‘em?” the man asked.

“Poinsettias.”

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Thor and Pandora

by Peter Molenaar

To the ancient observer, the approaching cumulonimbus cloud appeared as a giant hammer from which lightning bolts penetrated the earth.  Hence, the hammer-wielding Viking god associated with thunder storms and destruction, but also healing and renewal, was born in the people’s mind.  Thor was his name.

In the modern world, Thor’s considerable legacy is honored once a week (“Thor’s day”).

But what redemption might he bestow upon the suffering people of Japan?  Curiously, there is a chemical element which also bears his name.  Thorium, atomic number 90, has emerged as the alternative to uranium.

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MLK Author of A Memoir of Injustice Mayday Bookstore on May 13th 7 PM

Martin Luther King, Jr. was felled by an assassin’s bullet on April 4, 1968 in Tennessee. The lone gunman, escaped fugitive James Earl Ray, was arrested for the crime and spent the rest of his life behind bars. Case closed.

Except for one problem: he was innocent, and even King’s wife and son agree.

A Memoir of Injustice, by investigative journalist Tamara Carter, provides a behind-the-scenes look at the life of Ray, as told to her by Jerry Ray, his younger sibling. As Jerry freely admits, the Ray family was very dysfunctional from the word go. Many members spent time in prison, including the father, and the Ray brothers frequently found themselves in the Federal pen for any number of crimes. The book goes on to tell what it was like to be dirt poor, always on the run and is populated with all the nefarious characters that inhabit that world.

The elder Ray had rented a room in Bessie’s Flophouse on the orders of a mysterious drug smuggler he had met named Raoul. This was on the same day as the assassination. In addition, a 30.06 rifle that Ray had bought, again on Raoul’s instructions, was found nearby in an arcade. A later ballistic test could not prove that the bullet fired from the rifle was the same as the one that killed King. All further attempts to retest the supposed assassin’s rifle have been rebuffed by authorities. The authors feel this retesting would prove Ray’s innocence.

The book also names the people who were actually in on the conspiracy, including Frank Liberto, Loyd Jowers and the shooter, a local policeman and marksman.

“This book is a must read for every citizen of the United States…The accounts in the book lead the reader to question the evidence in the case against Jimmy Ray and the corruption of those intertwined in the assassination of a great American leader… Thank you to Tamara Carter and her great intellect and talent as a researcher and writer. I am so thankful to have had the opportunity to read Jerry’s story and reflect on the fact that things are not always what they appear to be.” — CJ Richardson

Ms Carter will be signing copies of A Memoir of Injustice at the Mayday Bookstore on May 13th at 7pm.  The store is located at 301 Cedar Ave. South in Minneapolis. See their website at www.maydaybookstore.org for more information.

A Memoir of Injustice is published by TrineDay Books. www.trineday.com

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Elizabeth Taylor, February 27, 1932 – March 23, 2011

Elizabeth Taylor

On July 22, 2010, Elizabeth Taylor tweeted “Hold your horses world. I’ve been hearing all kinds of rumors about someone being cast to play me in a film about Richard and myself…No one is going to play Elizabeth Taylor, but Elizabeth Taylor herself…Not at least until I’m dead, and at the moment I’m having too much fun being alive…and I plan on staying that way. Happiness to all.”

Arguably was my favorite living actress, ironically she starred in the movie “Giant”(1956) with Rock Hudson and Dennis Hopper, with George Steven’s direction.  Likewise this outstanding actress and beauty became a giant in her own right.  Lustrous, glamorous for sure, her life was “spirited’ or “controversial”, if for no other reason than she had eight marriages.  But, largely because of her beauty, for the life of me, critics had to wonder if someone so beautiful could be talented.  There always had been actresses with touching beauty–Rita Hayworth, Jane Russell, Lena Horne, Hedy Lamar, etc.,–yet Ms. Taylor captured the beauty as well as the controversy that surrounded her.
Taylor was a childhood actress. Her debut film was “There’s One Every Minute” (1942) but it was her role in “National Velvet”(1944) where she had eyes turned.  She starred in over 50 years and a career of 70 years.  Some of the films “A Place in the Sun”(1951), “Giant”(1956), “Raintree County”(1957),”Cat on a Hot Tin Roof”(1958), “Suddenly Last Summer”(1959), “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf” (1966) are  classics.  Throughout her life she suffered from various illnesses.  She was a survivor.  By way of seven marriages and husbands, Taylor was Mrs. Hilton, Wilding, Todd, Fisher, Burton, Burton, Warner, Fortensky.  There’s so much more I can say about Elizabeth Taylor but space won’t permit.

 

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Of Gods and Men

Of Gods and Men

Of Gods and Men

****1/2

Cast: Lambert Wilson (Christian),Michael Lonsdale (Luc), Olivier Rabordin (Christophe), Phillippe  Laudenbach (Celeslin), Jacquees Herlin Frin (Paul), abdelhafid Metalsi (Nouredine), Sabrince Ouazani (Rabbia), Olivier Perrier (Bruno), Fariid (Ali Fayattia), Adel Bencherif (Le Terroriste).  Country: France. Language: French in English subtitles.  Director: Xavier Beauvois. (PG-13) Running time: 120 minutes.

Riveting throughout, “Of Gods and Men,” is one of those films whereas the principal characters sit on a powder keg knowing at any time it can go off.  The courage to stay put, the eight Trappist monks’ faith and their agape love for the poor Algerian villagers continue in the midst of political turmoil in Algeria largely engineered by the Islamic Salvation Front defeating The National Liberation Front in1991, which overthrew the French in 1962.  In 1993, the Armed Islamic Group orders all foreigners out of Algeria in 30 days.

The film begins in 1996, the monks from France live in a small monastery in the hills close to the village.  Christian (Lambert Wilson), is the prior and has studied the Qur’an; Luc (Micheal Lonsdale), is the doctor who treats the villagers with no cost.  We learn about each of the six brothers and two priests.  They raise crops, tend beehives, tend to the sick, pray, and eat in common.  The monks are likely prevaricators in post-conciliar sensibilities when it comes to seeking conversions from Islam into Catholicism.

Danger for the monks is lurking nearby, as the terrorists or the Armed Islamic Groups, arrest or kill foreigners.  Croatian migrant workers are captured by armed Algerian men who cut their throats.  Thus the dangers to follow and swallow the handful of Trappist monks illuminate in unintended and ominous consequences in their chant from Psalms 143:3-5:

The enemy persecutes my  soul

He has made me dwell in darkness

With those long dead

My spirit grows faints within me

My  heart within me, dismayed

Today we hear of prejudice towards Muslims and Qur’an in the United States, and sometimes see a hate crime against a mosque or physical attacks against Muslim on television or internet but those incidents pale in contrast to discrimination and outright murder or serious injury to persons of non-Muslim faiths, namely Christian countries (i.e. Afghanistan,Pakistan,Algeria,etc.).

Beautiful scenes of each monk (all 50 years old) sitting at their dining table all looking with anxiety while listening to Tchaikovsky’s “Swan Lake” and drinking wine. Brother Christian previously with adeptness managed to keep the men from invading the monks’ entire space.  But, under the pretense of needing drugs for their injuried comrades, they would come back at a later date to raid Brother Lonsdale’s medical cabinet.  As Easter approaches events become bold against the monks.

Unlike so many films with an underlying ax to grind against Catholicism or evangelical Protestantism, Xavier Beauvois does the decent thing staying on the objective path.  If he had  taken the cheap shot road, he would have undermined his excellent synopsis.

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Commentary NRP Funds…Are Mpls. City Hall Democrats still Democrats? Party of Compassion?? Do the Math!! The Rich Get Richer, The Poor Get Poorer and Neighborhoods, too

By Carol Pass

In the midst of watching the destruction of the democratic right of collective bargaining going on next door in Wisconsin, an action bought and paid for by the billionaire Koch brothers, I attended a meeting called by a group of Democratic legislators. A graph was handed out, shown here, of the seriously regressive taxation rates current in Minnesota. Fellow Democrats in the room expressed outrage at years of too much political control by wealthy Republicans and at how regressive taxation has distorted the economy of the American populace into a tiny group of haves and a major group of have nots….so much so that a current magazine with clear legitimacy ran an article entitled ‘Plutocracy Now!’ (rule by the rich), a play on the name of the TV show ‘Democracy Now’.

The graph put out by the State Department of Revenue showed those making from $9,000 to $86,000 paying an average of 12% of their income for taxes, while those earning $447,000 and above paying only 8.9%. These wealthy folks use far more of the public resources from airports to roads to electricity, etc. yet they pay a far smaller percentage of their income in taxes than the middle and lower middle classes, who carry the greatest, by percentage income, of the tax load. How fair is this?? But these figures are primarily the result of the actions of the Republican Party. We Democrats in the room expected such.

Now look at the other figure, an analysis of the reapportioning by the Minneapolis Mayor and City Council of the NRP dollars once allocated by the legislature to the Neighborhoods. By the action of the “Democrats” of Minneapolis City Hall, a huge amount of remaining NRP dollars, money that was allocated primarily to the poorest and most diverse neighborhoods of Minneapolis, is being reallocated overwhelmingly to the wealthiest and least diverse Mpls. neighborhoods in the form of tax savings. This reallocation is more economically regressive than the truly regressive taxation by Republicans shown in the graph. It sends approximately $9 dollars to the affluent neighborhoods for every $1 dollar to the least affluent.  This is a wealth transfer from poor to rich of remarkable and unjust proportions. While the percentage tax saving is the same for both groups, the point is: the money to produce this huge influx to the non-diverse and affluent southwest neighborhoods is coming overwhelmingly from the poor and diverse neighborhoods such as Hawthorn, Jordan, Lind-Bohanon, Harrison and Near North, as seen in the chart. How is it possible that the outcome of the actions of our Democrats in City Hall so resembles and even goes beyond the results of the most conservative Republican majorities we have had in decades??

One of the legislators with us at that recent meeting commented that some of these Council Members who supported this action voted against the well-being of their own constituents. Those there applauded in recognition of the truth of this remark.

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Phillips Student Erika Espey-Sundt Honored for Songwriting

by Kevyn Burger

Erika Espey-Sundt, a senior studying music at the Perpich Center for Arts Education, is winner of Zeitgeist’s 16th annual Eric Stokes Song Contest in the youth category. Her piece, “Gust of Wind,” reflects the different stages of an adventure, from whimsy and playfulness to mystery and intensity.

The daughter of Kristen Sundt Espey-Sundt began composing just three months ago, under the direction of local composer and Arts High School music teacher Janika Vandervelde. Erika studies viola, violin and also enjoys singing.

“Composing this song started as a class assignment, but I spent a lot of time out of class working on it as well,” Erika said. “I can’t wait to see how they will arrange it and hear it performed. This is amazing.”

The Eric Stokes Song Contest is sponsored by new music group Zeitgeist in memory of late composer Eric Stokes; designed to encourage and celebrate amateur composers throughout the Twin Cities.

The winning composers have the opportunity to participate in Zeitgeist’s annual Playing it Close to Home concerts in February; in addition, she also receives a $100 prize and a one-year membership to the American Composers Forum.

“This was the strongest group of youth composers we’ve seen in the 16 years we’ve held this contest. Our judges were uniformly impressed with Erika’s mature and inventive composition, and we can’t wait to play it during our upcoming Playing it Close to Home concerts,” said Heather Barringer, artistic co-director and percussionist for Zeitgeist.

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Noche de Paz Night of Peace Celebrating community! Hosted by Latina leaders and friends

By Kathleen Sullivan and Mary Laurel True, Powderhorn neighbors

What brought neighbors to come together in warmth and light on a cold February evening?

Inspired by the Peace in Powderhorn event on December 1, Powderhorn neighbors kept the bonfires burning, and came together to enjoy a Noche de Paz or Night of Peace. It was an evening of fire and ice-lanterns, love of community, and warmth of togetherness on February 13, 2011 in Powderhorn Park.

The idea was spearheaded by a group of women who shared a vision. This vision was to extend the community spirit that came out of the December gathering, in pro-active ways that would continue throughout the year, with a goal of further developing a peaceful and united community. The fruit of their effort became Noche de Paz.

Bonfires, melty ice lanterns, and a painting of a peace dove transformed the outdoor space, while twinkling lights and homemade peace signs adorned the cozy space indoors. Park staff generously opened their doors to the community on their day off. Participants were treated to music by young D.J. Andres, drummer Tomas, and West African drummers Onayemi and friends. An appreciative audience huddled around the bonfires for warmth, and the wind seemed part of the show, as puppeteers Laura and John brought their story of the “Wintermaker” to life.

Everyone enjoyed delicious homemade soups from Sara and Senora Maria at La Poblanita. “It’s like the loaves and fishes!” Mary Laurel said of the bottomless soup pot from La Poblanita. Speaking of loaves, the New French Bakery shared an abundance of bread, while New York Plaza Produce donated cookies. Aliina, Nicolas, and Eat 4 Equity provided silverware and Powderhorn Park provided dishes for a zero-waste event. Several volunteers graciously worked behind the scenes to keep a steady supply of clean dishes.

People who never thought of themselves as learders came forward and were suddenly holding a microphone, or were being interviewed on Univision, the local Spanish TV station! (See Youtube for the video from Univision as well as one from the Minneapolis Mirror.) The entire event was in held in Spanish and in English. Josefina and Doug invited everyone to take part in the neighborhood Safety Committee, Dara invited involvement in Powderhorn Park Neighborhood Association. Young Netem and younger Emmet spoke about what they love about Powderhorn.

Hosted by Mujeres en Accion y Poder (Women in Action and Power) at Corcoran Neighborhood Association, several women came together to plan this event: Silvia, Fabiola, Teresa, Josefina, Francesca, Lina, Khusaba, Fernanda, Jessica, Amada, Vienna, Kathleen, and Mary Laurel. New leaders came forward, and many neighbors became involved, forming connections with each other and furthering the goal to increase unity and peace in our community.

To all in the Powderhorn area who love their neighborhood, we invite you to a proposed Peacemakers Gathering to discuss future events and plans. To participate, contact Silvia at Mujeres en accion y poder 612-724-7457 spthalia1103@gmail.com or Lina at Powderhorn Park Neighborhood Association, 612-722-4817 lina@ppna.com.

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