NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Thursday February 22nd 2018

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Corcoran Neighborhood Organization’s 7th Annual $.50-$2.50 Book Sale

Sat. Oct. 23rd from 9 to 4  3451 Cedar Avenue South. Books of all kinds.  Book lovers, come and enjoy homemade baked goods and books $0.50-$2.50!  Raffle prizes from area businesses! Proceeds benefit the work of CNO. Donations being accepted at the CNO Office. Info: Nathan Matter at 612-724-7457 or email info@corcoranneighborhood.org.

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A Peace of My Mind a place to hear voices for peace

By John Noltner

This exhibit is the result of almost two years of work, exploring the meaning of peace.

The seed for this project was planted as two events in my photographic journey coincided. The first was a sort of restlessness I had been feeling for some time that I was not doing exactly what I had been made to do. The second event was the economic downturn, which provided me with some much-needed time for reflection and evaluation.

I was born the son of a social worker and an educator, so I suppose there was always fertile soil for this sort of subject matter to thrive. I have always had an interest in social justice issues, serving on several boards for non-profits that did good work both here and abroad.

Yet I am not an expert on peace. I have no formal training in the subject, and I hold no related academic degree. You can ask my friends…ask my family…and they will tell you that I regularly miss the mark when it comes to living in harmony with others.

But being perfect is not the goal of this exhibit. This project is about moving forward…about finding ways that we can bridge some of our differences and about celebrating the common humanity that binds us all.

I believe in the power of stories. Through images and words I have spent my career telling stories and that is what I have set out to do with this series. Each of these subjects has a unique story to tell…a unique perspective on peace…and I am grateful they were willing to share it.

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“A Peace Of My Mind” Photo Exhibit to Open on United Nations International Day of Peace September 21 at Midtown Global Market

by Megan Swenson

Twin Cities photographer John Noltner will open his new documentary exhibit, “A Peace of My Mind” at Midtown Global Market on Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2010, coinciding with the United Nation’s International Day of Peace.

“A Peace of My Mind” is a project that combines art and storytelling to explore the meaning of peace. Since early 2009, Noltner has interviewed 52 individuals about their thoughts on peace, including Holocaust survivors, a Buddhist minister, a homeless man, and many others. He asked what peace means to them, what they do to work towards it in their lives and what obstacles they encounter along the way.

The exhibit showcases 24” x 36” black and white portraits of each of the subjects as well as excerpts from their interviews. Full audio from the interviews can be downloaded from the project’s website, www.apeaceofmymind.net. Visitors are encouraged to download these interviews to their MP3 players and listen to them as they view the photographs.

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A Peace of My Mind a place to hear voices for peace: Stories

DAVID A. DE LAMPERT, JR.

David A. De Lampert Jr. has been living on the streets of Minneapolis for the past 30 years. A veteran, he survives on disability checks and through gratuities people offer him.

David spends his days inviting people to sign his coat with a permanent marker. When they sign, they will often give him a dollar or two “to help keep me going.” He has filled up more than 100 coats with signatures over the past decade, as well as hats, umbrellas, and canes.

For David, collecting signatures began as a way to survive, but eventually became a way for him to reach out to other people.

I feel it’s the richest thing you got going for you is your name. As we fight in this world to obtain something for ourselves and to be somebody – nobody wants to feel like they’re nobody, no matter who it is. I encourage people to believe, in my travels, that we are somebody. That everybody is somebody, regardless if you are an addict, alcoholic, or whatever. Whatever your vice is in life, I happen to believe you can be at peace with yourself. Get to know who you are. This has given me an opportunity to know me.

People are so hard on each other, nitpicking and always looking for something wrong and wanting to put someone down. People don’t know how to forgive. That’s the one thing the world ain’t caught onto yet, forgiveness. We have a problem with forgiving each other so we gonna have a problem with being at peace with each other.

And then you got those who like to keep up a lot of razzamatazz. They like to keep up a lot of bullshit. There are those in this world who are not satisfied unless they are jamming somebody else’s life up.

And to find out there are people in high places who do things like that, it kind of frustrates me, because I work hard at maintaining my own peace down here. I don’t get up there. I get to stay down here. And there’s a great gulf between the ones at the top and we who are at the bottom. But one more day above ground is better than one underneath, so I try to be at peace most of the time.

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Tell your story

by Harvey Winje, Editor

Children worldwide have said, “tell me a story” in all languages for centuries. Don Hewitt used those words explaining his success as the Emmy Award winning creator of 60 Minutes. People’stories were a main source for A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn. Studs Terkel was another preeminent master of recording stories. He said “curiosity didn’t kill this cat” as he explained his life time of interviewing people.

These men died in the last two years. With their deaths, we lost three giant chroniclers of people’s stories. Fortunately, their example and legacy has been continued and taken further by others still recording the lives of common people.

The Alley Newspaper is pleased to present the superb portraits entwined with stories by photojournalist John Noltner as a preview of a much larger collection to be displayed at Midtown Global Market beginning from Sept. 21st to Oct. 24th. John Noltner is one of those people moving the mission of Hewitt, Zinn, and Terkel into the future.

Every page of this issue exemplifies storytelling by other people, too. Enjoy, learn, and be inspired by these stories. We invite you to take your place and Tell Your Story.

The Alley Newspaper remains available to you so you may tell your stories and express your opinions to one another. Please call 612-990-4022 or e-mail editor@alleynews.org to find out more about having your story appear in The Alley Newspaper.

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Wedding Announcement: Jonathan Miller weds Amy Wehrman

Amy Wehrman & Jonathan Miller

Longtime (gosh, it has been a long time, hasn’t it) Alley editor and graphic designer Jonathan Miller celebrated his nuptials to Amy Wehrman on August 14. Amy and Jonathan celebrated their wedding with 160 of their friends and family at the Mill City Museum in Minneapolis. The old-exploded-flour-mill-reborn-as-wonderful-museum was chosen to celebrate the coming together of the self-professed nature girl Amy Wehrman and the urban landscape lover Jonathan Miller. So far, all reports of the evening declared it a complete and total success and that a fine time was had by all.

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Losing our Assets: A Plea For Help!

By Robert Albee

I started out trying to tell a story about Ancient Traders, the East Franklin Avenue strip mall across the street from my house, but wise counsel prevailed and pointed out too many holes, inaccuracies and inflammatory language in that draft so it is better to start afresh. So this story is more of an editorial than a narrative, as it awaits a true storyteller with more time and access to facts than I possess.

This piece begins with a plea to our state elected officials—Senator Berglin and Representative Clark and our county and municipal officials, Peter McLaughlin, Robert Lilligren and Gary Schiff— requesting that we begin a forensics investigation into the practice using one property to leverage another when public monies were originally used and were obtained to serve a given locality. In a shifting economy, this conduct has the makings to destabilize an area that was only recently stabilized, with investments of more than $130 million and crime rates dropping along the East Franklin Avenue corridor.

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Great Granddaughter ‘Uprights” Legacy and Its Marker for Another Century

By Sue Hunter Weir

Setting grave markers is a tough business. Wrestling blocks of stone that weigh several hundreds of pounds into place requires muscle and planning. Ensuring that the stones are level when the ground is uneven is tricky and tree roots don’t make the job any easier. On Sunday, August 22nd, staff from Grave Groomers, a local restoration company, set about repairing the marker for Lina Quam.

Mrs. Quam’s marker is in the center island of the cemetery. Someone (it isn’t clear who) planted a tree between her marker and the marker directly north of hers. It probably seemed like a good idea at the time. But over a hundred years later, the cottonwood is still there and still growing. As the tree has grew, its widening trunk caused the top of Mrs. Quam’s obelisk-shaped marker to list, and within the last five years toppled it altogether.

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SEARCHING – a Serial Novelle CHAPTER 18: Truth, in all its profound beauty and terror.

By Patrick Cabello Hansel

Coffee, pancakes, the smiles and shouts of people who love you—who cares if you’re celebrating the Feast Day of the Virgen de Guadalupe, the patroness of Mexico and all the Americas—sitting in a sticky booth at Denny’s at 11:22 pm.

This is the crowd that greeted Angel & his dad, Augusto: the Luz, the light of his life, her grandmother Dolores, Mr. Bussey, his old teacher from Roosevelt, Mother Light the healer, and her helper Ana. They were seated under two signs that had yellowed with age. One read: Between 10pm and 5pm, minimum order $3.00, maximum stay 2 hours. The other: No Card Playing in This Restaurant. Angel was going to ask if card playing was allowed in other Denny’s, but as he began to form the words, Mr. Bussey and Mother Light each pulled out a deck and began shuffling.

“What shall we play?” Mr. Bussey asked. “Bid Whist? Buck Euchre? Pinochle?”

“Clabber? Skat? Bourré?” Mother Light chimed in.

“¿Conquian? ¿Siete Loco? ¿Burro Castigado?” laughed Dolores.

“Hey, wait a minute!” Angel laughed. “It says “No Card Playing in This Restaurant! You’re going to get us kicked out before we even eat!”

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“Tell Me a Story”…in Kathleen Anderson’s Words

Kathleen Anderson, longtime district director for Congressman Martin Sabo, who lived in Longfellow Neighborhood growing up.

Lake Street Council is working hard this year to collect and promote the history of this area. The first stage to this project is collecting oral histories of longtime residents. Here’s part of the interview with Kathleen Anderson, longtime district director for Congressman Martin Sabo, who lived in Longfellow growing up. Please visit youtube.com/VisitLakeStreet to watch the whole video interview with Kathleen and others! And if you are a longtime resident who remembers well the Lake Street from decades past, and would like your story recorded, please get in touch with us! Call 612-824-7420 or email coien@lakestreetcouncil.org.

By Kathleen Anderson as told to Chris Oien

I lived on 39th St. & 44th Ave., which is about 9 blocks from Lake Street, and several blocks from the river. Mostly we would ride our bikes, or I would take the 42nd Ave. bus to about 36th St. and then transfer to the Lake Street bus. Sometimes we’d go east toward the river, there was an ice cream shop, I believe it was a Bridgeman’s, for ice cream. Or, we would take the bus to the west toward the Uptown area and the lakes. We would stop sometimes at the Town Talk, which was there. We were into picture taking as teenagers, and we would have our film developed on the second floor of the building above the Town Talk.

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