NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Saturday June 23rd 2018

Keep citizen journalism alive!

Donatebutton_narrow

Archives

Searching – A Serial Novelle Chapter 24: “The Great Divide”

By Patrick Cabello Hansel

Luz had her own story, part of which she had buried deep. Growing up in two countries—in the winter along the US-Mexico border, Pharr on the Texan side, a small pueblo outside of Matamoros in the land of Cuauhtémoc. During the harvest season, she travelled with her family to the onions, the peas, the corn, the green beans, the pumpkin. She learned to pick before she could read.

Luz had family on both sides of the great divide. Mexican and US. Documented and undocumented. Speaking Spanish, speaking English. Migrants and land owners. Dead and alive. Her ancestry went back to great healers of the Nahuatl people, who had had their hands cut off and their tongues torn out by the conquistadors for being “pagan”. And she was a direct descendant of Mateo Kelly Hidalgo, the ghost of these pages, the prince of the divide.

This came pouring out little by little as she talked with Angel. They had walked into the teeth of the blizzard until they reached the Global Market, where they bought coffee and chai. Although she had felt cold much of the day, she now felt like she was burning up. She knew Angel needed to hear something, but she didn’t know what she needed to tell.

“I don’t know where to start, Angel. We moved around a lot, and so I never made any real friends. I really wanted to belong to something. But we moved and moved and moved. I always had my family, but I wanted something else. Then, one year, my Dad said, we’re staying put. So we stayed in Hollandale all year, in a little house. But it was out house. And I went to the same school all year long.”

“And that’s where you met that guy we just ran into?” Angel asked.

“Yes”

“Who is he? What did he do to you?”

“He is my executioner” she said, looking not at Angel, but at the floor. She raised her eyes. “My enemy. Sometimes I can almost feel him, like a power, a threat inside of me.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Squire Borden, Tender of first Bridge Across the Mississippi River

Members of the Minneapolis Cemetery Protective Association’s Ladies Auxiliary sprucing up the cemetery in the Spring of 1926. The cemetery will reopen on April 15th, 2010.

by Susan Hunter Weir

Squire Borden was born on the Atlantic Ocean on August 25, 1823. Perhaps that explains his life-long attraction to water. For many years, he worked as the bridge-tender on the first two suspension bridges that spanned the Mississippi River in Minneapolis, and since everyone who crossed the bridge encountered him, his was one of the most familiar faces in the city.

In 1854, local entrepreneurs paid for the first bridge in the country to span the Mississippi River. The bridge was made of wood, and the cost of operating it was initially covered by tolls (two cents for a pedestrian and 25 cents for a wagon). Twenty years after it was built, the bridge was in poor condition and too narrow to accommodate the number of wagons that needed to cross it. The City contracted with Thomas M. Griffith, a nationally-known engineer, to build a replacement.

The second bridge, 675 feet long and 32 feet wide, was constructed of steel and concrete rather than wood. It was thought to be an engineering marvel and crowds gathered along the riverbanks every day to watch construction workers string the cables from one side of the river to the other. Local boosters claimed that this new wonder would last for at least half-a-century, but it lasted only 24 years.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Food Obsession: PANCAKES

By Jane Thomson

More pancakes and less prose (could this be on a t-shirt?) Pancakes, combined with fruit and either milk, eggs, yoghurt or sausage make a decent meal. It’s only when you take in “all you can eat” that they become a weight hazard. Any of the pancakes below would be good with syrup, honey or tart/sweet fruit jelly.

WATKINS OATMEAL PANCAKES – (This must refer to the Watkins company that sold household items, including vanilla, door to door. Perhaps they are still in business.)

1cup rolled oats

½ cup of whole wheat or unbleached white flour

1 ½ cup buttermilk or low-fat milk

2 eggs, beaten

2 tsp. baking powder

2 tsp. vanilla

1tsp. cinnamon

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

9 Cent Movies and Sugar from Minnehaha Fire Station

Bill Nelson, Director of Correctional Services at Volunteers of America, shares some of his many Lake Street memories. Go to www.youtube.com/visitlakestreet to watch his whole story, and those of others.

By Joyce Wisdom and Chris Oien

My name is Bill Nelson, and I showed up in the neighborhood of March 1941, which was just a few months before Pearl Harbor. Some of my earliest memories go back to shortly after the beginning of World War II, when I and my mother, along with my brother who was an infant at the time, would make the trek from 36th Ave. to the old fire station on Minnehaha [the current home of Patrick’s Cabaret]. And of course, you take a kid my age, she could hardly drag me away I was so fascinated with the fire engines. But the reason we went there was to get our sugar rations. Those were the days of austerity and World War II.

I grew up at 36th & Lake, just a half block off from Lake. In the vicinity were businesses like Peterson Drug, Lubiss Hardware, Supervalu, and of course everyone knew Liberty Grocery, which was on 35th & Lake. When we went to the movies, we went to the matinee usually, and paid nine cents to get in. We went to the El Lago Theater, but also in the area on 27th was the Lake Theater, and further down was the East Lake. That’s how we spent our time, it was quite a treat to go to the movies. I can only remember once that we went out to eat. It was always that you ate at home, and that was it.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Howard’s top 10 movies of 2010

King's Speech

Howard McQuitter II
Movie Corner
HowardMcQuitterii@yahoo.com

King’s Speech

The King’s Speech is this year’s favorite film for me after pondering on it hours and even days later. Colin Firth (nominated for best actor in a “Single Man” in 2009) plays King George VI. He ascends the throne in Great Britain in 1936, when his brother King Edward VIII (Guy Pearce) abdicates the throne rather than sever his marriage to twice-divorced American socialite Wallis Simpson (Eve Best). His marriage causes a constitutional and ecclesiastical crisis for the United Kingdom and the Dominions. Before George VI takes the throne, he is Duke of Cornwall.

George VI has one stumbling problem: he stammers. He’s sent to a rather unorthodox speech therapist, Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush) who, after a number of hurdles with George, achieves success. George VI’s wife Elizabeth (Helena Bonham Carter) encourages him to continue to see Lionel. George VI ascends the throne concurrently with Hitler beginning to move aggressively across Europe.

“The King’s Speech” was nominated for best director (Tom Hooper), in addition to best picture as well as Colin Firth for best actor, Helena Bonham Carter for best supporting actress and Geoffrey Rush for best supporting actor.

Inception

Inception is arguably the most imaginative big film of the year. What irks me though is the Academy conveniently snubbing director Christopher Nolan for nomination in the best director slot. True, “Inception” received eight nominations, but Nolan is disgracefully excluded. Why and how “The Fighter” director David O Russell is chosen over Nolan borders on scandal.

That said, “Inception” is full of illusion and perception, starring Leonardo DiCaprio as James Cobb. He is on a path of labyrinths because he has the “gift” of inserting ideas into people’s dreams. His challenge is to successfully insert in the hopes of getting the person to think it is his or her own idea. Cobb is wooed by a shrewd Japanese businessman, Salto (Ken Watanabe). Cobb’s memory of his wife (Marion Cottilard) haunts him and he wants to reconnect with his children. Arthur (Joseph Gordon Levitt), Ariadne (Ellen Page) and Earnest (Tom Hardy) work with Cobb in pursuit of business magnate Robert Fischer (Cillian Murphy).

Nolan’s “Inception” (also of “Memento”, “The Prestige”, “The Dark Knight”) is a fine-tuned, convoluted, intelligent piece of work. As such, Nolan’s hand is solid, the prejudicial Academy’s hand is not.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

March 2011 Daves’ Dumpster

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Millions In Motion

By Peter Molenaar

The people in this neighborhood of the world have yet another opportunity to experience an enhanced human connection—to elicit a smile and eye contact from the Arab people among us.  For example, don’t just plop coins on the counter at the corner convenience store, but boldly ask:  “What’s your opinion regarding the Egyptian Revolution?”  You are likely to discover a knowledgeable person.

Why the commotion in Arab lands?

In Egypt, we are told, the corruption of the old regime cost more than $6 billion in public money per year.  Estimates of the former president’s accumulated fortune range as high as $70 billion.  Mubarek’s good buddies became merely billionaires while millions lived on less than $2 per day.  Heartless brutality appears as the hallmark of a regime which sadly was considered to have been a “good friend of the United States”.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Editorial “A Smile is…the shortest distance between people.”

The final piano number at the recent Grand Opening of the American Swedish Institute’s Victor Borge Exhibit was the nostalgic Claire de Lune played by pianist Glenn Henriksen.

The last quotation shared by Janet Borge Crowle, a daughter of Borge, following nearly an hour of fascinating reminiscing about her “Papa,” the famous “Great Dane” and Clown Prince, was, “A smile is the shortest distance between people.”

Claire de Lune was always Borge’s final song.  It is also a reminder that even with turbulence in his life composer Claude-Achille DeBussy was able to compose contemplative and even romantic music like this song of the moon.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Concrete Beet Farmers Puts Down Roots in Midtown Phillips

By Dusty Hinz

What do you get when you mix a global environmental crisis, an industrial food system that threatens our food security, a city with an increasing number of vacant properties, and six conscious young people with an entrepreneurial and community spirit? The answer is a micro urban farm that seeks to help re-localize our community food system, beautify our neighborhood, and combat climate change.

Concrete Beet Farmers is a new urban farming venture being started in a vacant lot in the Midtown Phillips neighborhood that attempts to be part of this solution. The team of six entrepreneurs consists of four current Macalester students, a recent Augsburg graduate, and a recent University of Minnesota graduate now living in the neighborhood.

This farming venture will not be held captive to the sole pursuit of profit; rather, it will strive for ecological resilience, long-term financial sustainability, and community food access and education. This small-scale, tangible project is devoted to the triple-bottom-line—where profits are measured environmentally, socially, and economically.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

After 18 years! Tim Springer Resigns as Executive Director: Replacement Sought

by Tim Springer

“Wow. I am profoundly grateful for the opportunity I’ve had to work on the Greenway as part of a team with dedicated fellow staff, volunteers, elected officials, and public and private partners. Yay for the Midtown Greenway, Minnesota’s busiest bikeway! I’m also very proud that we’ve created a new national model for community involvement with alternative transportation and city building. I made the decision to leave so the Coalition can fly on its own and I can explore new things. “

The Coalition board requests your help recruiting an outstanding new Executive Director prior to Tim’s departure on June 3. Applications are due March 11. Visit the Greenway web site to view the job description.

 

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
 Page 150 of 175  « First  ... « 148  149  150  151  152 » ...  Last »