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Saturday November 18th 2017

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Thanks to YOU, The Alley Is Bound for the Future!

60 people attended the Oct 23rd Bound for the Future event.  Here a third of them are pictured listening to Cathy Strobel describe the project.

60 people attended the Oct 23rd Bound for the Future event. Here a third of them are pictured listening to Cathy Strobel describe the project.

by Susan Gust

Neighbors, friends, advertisers, writers, cartoonists, delivery people, volunteers, young and old, new and well-heeled,—–gathered at the Cultural Wellness Center for a terrific Annual Meeting celebrating 34 years of The Alley Newspaper. This important event also served as a fundraiser for our Bound for the Future Project.

Cathy Strobel, President of Alley Communications’ Board of Directors announced at the meeting that the Hennepin County Library has generously decided to contribute the cost of printing and binding two sets of the 17 volumes holding 30 years worth of history, photos and stories contained in over 4,000 pages of The Alley Newspaper. One of these two sets will be located at the Downtown Library and the other set will be available in our own community at the Franklin Library. The Board and volunteers of Alley Communications, the community owned, non-profit publisher of The Alley Newspaper, are so very grateful for the efforts of the staff of the Hennepin County Library and Commissioner Peter McLaughlin’s office that helped to make this project successful.

The printing of these two sets has been completed and now the volumes are being bound. We will make an announcement in an upcoming issue of The Alley Newspaper as to when this project has been completed and delivered to each of the libraries.

Alley Communications especially wants to thank the organizational contributors to the Bound for the Future Project: Franklin Avenue Business Association (FABA), Chicago Lake Florist, the Cultural Wellness Center and Hennepin County Library. Our Annual Meeting and fundraiser was made possible through the in-kind contributions of May Day Café, May Day Book Store, Jonathan Miller, Leon Oman, Helen Pound, Cathy Strobel, Jane Thomson, Sue Hunter Weir, and Joyce Wisdom. We especially want to commend the Cultural Wellness Center for making this event possible with their generous commitment of valuable staff time, food and consistent encouragement and help in hosting this event on October 23.

The evening’s program culminated with a time of tributes to Leon Oman upon his retirement after 28years as Coordinator of Community Education at Andersen Elementary School. The Alley Board was pleased to hear and announce that Leon will stay on the Alley Board and as our bookkeeper. Thank you, Leon.

Thank you, Thank you to all of our neighbors for being our neighbors. Thank you to those neighbors, our readers, who have thus far contributed a total of $1,715

For those who haven’t contributed yet, please know that any amount is appreciated. Every dollar raised has helped to contribute to this tremendous effort to get 30 years of The Alley Newspapers gathered together, organized, transported, printed and bound.
We’re excited now to anticipate going beyond just the hard copy sets at the libraries by increasing the access with microfilms of past Alleys through the Minnesota Historical Society, digital access of past issues, and finally indexing so names, events, and articles may be found quickly.

The January issue of The Alley will have a report on the finances and progress of the bound for the future project and an Annual Report to the Community of your paper, The Alley.

Each of the contributions, large and small, helped the community members governing this endeavor to truly feel a vote of confidence of the importance of keeping The Alley bound for the future! As Phillips Community namesake, Wendell Phillips said: “When great newspapers don’t say much…see what little independent ones say. We came into this world to give truth a little jog onward; we came into the world to help our neighbor’s rights.”

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With Necessity as the Mother of Invention, Brothers “Rack-Up” Success

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The infamous Seward racks at the Co-op

by Megan Sheridan

It all started at the University of Minnesota’s Campus Security. As Rolf Scholtz and his brother Derk used to patrol the Twin Cities Cam­pus, they would notice how unappealing and dysfunctional the bike racks were – as far as they could tell, the market for aesthetically appealing, U-lock compatible bike racks was wide open. After spending some time out of college in an eco­nomic development position, Rolf, along with his artistically inclined brother started Dero Bike Racks, now at 2657 32nd Ave S. And since 1995, they have been producing racks that are shipped all across the country as well as other parts of the world.

The foundation of Dero’s work is based on functionality and artistic appeal: all Dero racks are U-lock compatible, so users are assured that their bikes are safe; and all Dero racks are aesthetically attractive, so architects and planners can integrate them as visible aspects of their designs.

Dero Bike Racks is also firmly rooted in the community. The original office was located at Seven Corners, directly above Bullwinkle’s Saloon and warehousing located in Phillips. The company’s first real break was when they worked with Uptown to do one of the nation’s first large-scale artistic bike rack installation. From there, Dero landed contracts with the City of Honolulu and the University of Minnesota as the business began to really take off. But even as they grew, Dero stayed in Minneapolis, first moving to Prospect Park and later to their current facil­ity in Seward.

In 2003, Hans Steege joined the Dero team. One year later, was when they moved to Seward. Rolf told me that they were ready and almost signed a lease in another neighbor­hood when he noticed the building on 32nd Avenue while out walking his dog (both Rolf and Hans are long-time Seward residents). After moving into the neighborhood, Dero invested in their own equipment. Until then, racks had been finshed and packaged offsite. Within the first month, sales went up 25 percent. Their leap of faith paid off because they were then able to control quality throughout the entire process and ensure that everything went out properly.

Quality control and exceptional customer service are what make Dero so successful. They are willing to work with any customer, no matter the size project, to develop exactly what they need. For example, when working with the University of Minnesota, Dero came up with a customized rack that fit the specific project. Dero now offers what was origi­nally customized as a regular product.

Most recently, Dero installed the beautiful custom Seward bike racks that are now scattered through­out the neighborhood. They also donated the tem­porary bike racks used in Washington D.C. for the Presidential Inuaguration and just last month, they were contracted to install bike racks throughout the City of Dubai.

Years in Seward: 5
Employees: 18 (24 including the dogs)
Megan Sheridan, staff of Seward Redesign working with Seward Civic and Commerce Association. reprinted with permission from the Seward Civic and Commerce Association October 2009 Newsletter

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November Phillips What? Where?

November Hint: Out of an explosion order appears.

November Hint: Out of an explosion order appears

Tell us correctly What and Where this is in PHILLIPS Community and you will get a chance at a drawing for a $10. Gift Certificate to Welna Hardware on Bloomington Ave. One winner for each will be drawn. Call or write: 612-990-4022 or via e-mail or The Alley P.O. Box 7006, Mpls, MN 55407
November HINT:
Out of an explosion order appears.

Update on the East Phillips Park Cultural and Community Center

By Brad Pass, Chair, East Phillips Park Community Design Team
On October 1st, the bids for the new East Phillips Park Cultural and Community Center were opened. Of the thirteen bidding construction companies, not one bid exceeded the money we have available for the project and the three lowest bids came in sufficiently low so as to allow us to include EVERTHING we had cut weeks ago when we were concerned about pre-bid estimates.

We had sadly cut the Elderly and Family Gathering Space, amounting to 1,000 Sq Ft from the south end of the building. Then we eliminated sound insulating material in the gym. We eliminated all the appliances and the ventilation and make-up air system from the Kitchen along with many other less noticeable cost cutting measures including the elimination of the exterior plaza sitting wall. As a result of this, we were able to reduce the estimated building costs by just enough to warrant putting out the bids to the building construction industry. The bids were to go out in early September with a deadline of October 1st. Then, on Sept. 3rd, we were informed that our figures did not include money for a contingency fund. An additional $150,000 would be needed. The decision was made to proffer the bids anyway and hope for the best.

Now the contingency is also covered and we can even consider additional additions. The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board Commissioners voted unanimously; at their october 21st meeting, the “contingent upon staff receiving the city purchasing department’s approval letter, (the mprb) authorizes acceptance of the low bid from rochon corporation…to furnish all labor, materials, equipment, and incidentals for construction of the east phillips cultural and community center….” including all the items that had recently been eliminated.
Once the City Purchasing Department approves Rochon Corp. the bid will be awarded and we can plan a groundbreaking ceremony. The actual groundbreaking and start of construction may be in early spring to avoid winter construction fees which, if avoided, can be used for more computers, security cameras, furniture, furnishings and etc.

Now we will continue to work with the Park Staff and our Partners to create great programming and a strong volunteer base of support for our Center.

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What’s Up at the Franklin Library: November 2009

By Erin Thomasson
Children’s Programs
Sheeko Caruur Af-Soomaali ah/World Language Storytime: Somali*
Tuesdays, Nov. 3, 10, 17 & 24, 6:30–7:30 p.m. La wadaag bugagga, sheekoyinka, jaan-gooyada maansada iyo muusikada Soomaalida. Waxaa lagu maalgaliyey deeq ay Comcast Foundation siisay Library Foundation of Hennepin County.
For children ages 2 and up. Experience the world in other languages. *

The Turkey That Got Away
Friday, Nov. 6, 3–4 p.m.
For kids in grade 2 and up. What would Thanksgiving dinner be without the turkey? Kids will find out by sharing great books and fun activities.

Kids Book Club
Friday, Nov. 20, 4-5 p.m.
Join other kids to talk about a great book! Pick up a copy of the book at the information desk
Preschool Storytime
Wednesdays, 10:30-11:00 a.m.
For children ages 4 to 6. Help your preschooler get ready to read. Enjoy stories together and build language skills.

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Sigstad Sisters and Frank Brant Die in River Road Accident Street Conditions not on Par with Coming of Motorized Vehicles – Changes Were Needed

004.02 Tales Photo mabel

Mabel Sigstad who worked for a laundry company met a tragic death along with Ida, her sister and Frank Brant, a friend along the River Parkway November 3, 1916

by Sue Hunter Weir

On November 3, 1916, Ida and Mabel Sigstad were on their way home from a party in St. Paul in a car driven by E. C. Nelson. When Mr. Nelson turned onto the River Road and River Parkway, one of the car’s rear tires slid over a ten-foot embankment and the car flipped, trapping the driver and its three passengers underneath it. Mr. Nelson lost consciousness; he woke on and off during the next four hours and called out to his passengers but got no response.

John Kelly, the night watchman at Lock and Dam #1 was on his way home from work at 7 o’clock in the morning when he discovered the accident. He called several of his fellow workmen, and they were able to right the car and pull it off of the passengers. By that time, it was too late for Ida and Mabel and for Frank Brant, the other passenger in the car. They had smothered under the weight of the car.

Ida and Mabel were two of Ole Sigstad’s four daughters. Ida worked as a clerk in a downtown department store, and Mabel worked for a laundry company. They lived with their father, a bricklayer, their mother and one other sister, Emma, at 5023 28th Avenue South. Their parents learned about the accident early on the morning after it occurred. Mrs. Sigstad had spent a sleepless night waiting for their daughters to come home and, according to the Minneapolis Tribune’s account of the accident, woke up another of their daughters, Emma, and told her that she had a premonition that something was wrong—that she could hear her daughters groaning. Unable to sleep, Mrs. Sigstad was out working in her yard when she was notified of the accident.

By 1916, cars were no longer a rarity, but the cost of owning a car was beyond the means of most families. With only 13,101 licensed cars on the road in Minneapolis in 1915, collisions between cars were rare. Most accidents were the result of poor maneuverability in combination with poor road conditions. Rollover accidents were common when unpaved roads with steep embankments were the norm. The speed limit in downtown Minneapolis (the “loop”) was “flexible;” drivers could drive between 10-15 miles per hour. The speed limit on country roads was 30 miles per hour, and on city streets drivers could go as fast as 25 miles per hour. Children, playing or running into the street, were the victims of most accidents on city streets.

The two sisters were buried at Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers after a double funeral conducted by Rev. John Preus of Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church. They were buried in Lot 6, Block M with four other members of their family: Gertrude, Inga C., Inga Mathilda and Oscar Sigstad. The other children, most infants, died from a variety of illnesses in the 1890s.

Sue Hunter Weir is Phillips historian extraordinaire, member of Friends of the Cemetery who, with husband Paul Weir, have lived in Phillips over 30 years and together also garden with the 12th & 13th Avenue Block Club, was a co-founder of Phillips website pnn.org.

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SPORTS TALK

By Ray Jay and Young Dex

Let’s start this edition of sports talk out with a big congratulations to Lynx coach Jen Gillom and Lynx point guard Renee Montgomery as they were selected to be representatives on The United States Women’s Basketball team for the pre Olympics Games.

We must also congratulate our Minnesota Twins as they made the American League play-offs with an exciting one game play-off entry win over The Detroit Tigers. Needless to say, that game took all of their oomph, as they were swept in the first round by the powerful New York Yankees, who beat the California Angels, Tori Hunter’s new team, in their best of seven ALCS playoffs for the World Series. Speaking of Tori, just imagine that we may still be playing had the Twins retained him, and/or Johan Santana. Oh well! That’s the way the small markets go, so some say.

The Minnesota Vikings are riding high as they go into the seventh week of the young NFL season undefeated. I admit, I was wrong about Mr. Brett Favre. The coaching still raises my eyebrows, however, and we can only hope that gets better.

What about the MN Wild NHL team. Two words; They Stink!

This next team, The MN Timberwolves, I’m not going to say stink, I will say they have their work cut out for them, as they are currently 1-4 in the exhibition season. It doesn’t help the cause when two of your best players go down to injuries in the pre-season. I really like young Jonny Flynn, the rookie point guard from Syracuse; Damien Wilkins, son of NBA great Dominique Wilkins and Ryan Hollins show a lot of promise. We think a key to this season will be Sasha Pavlovic, the 6’7” guard from Serbia, who gives the wolves something they have not had in many years, a big shooting guard who can hit the threes. With K-Love, Kevin Love out till December and Al Jefferson still suffering from his season ending surgery, the other players will have to step up. The Timberwolves only have five players returning from last year, so developing new chemistry is vital.

Seeing as how a couple of sub .500 teams made the play-offs last year, we would not count the Timberwolves out at this time. They are going to need a sixth man, in fan support, to be competitive.

Here are our starting Timberwolves line-ups. Ray Jay would start Jefferson, Gomes, Flynn, Wilkins and Pavlovic at season’s start. I still feel that Brewer is so much stronger coming off the bench with his hustling style. Young Dex would start Jefferson, Gomes, Cardinal, Flynn and Brewer. He just doesn’t believe in the new guys as of yet. In any event we will need strong games from Sessions and Hollins every night.
Coach Rambis is in a similar position that Lynx Coach Gillom was in during the WNBA just ended season, in that he will have to find some creative ways to motivate and stimulate this Timberwolves team. The home opener is Wednesday October 28th against the New Jersey Nets, followed on October 30 against the revamped Cleveland Cavaliers with LaBron James and Shaquille O’Neil.
Come out and be a part of that sixth man.

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Into Temptation & Jennifer’s Body

By Howard Mc Quitter, II
Into Temptation
****
Director: Patrick Coyle

Intotempationposter2

Into Temptation

Minneapolis based director Patrick Coyle is a tenacious, conscious man who has a passion for making movies or acting in movies. After seeing Coyle’s debut film “Detective Fiction” (filmed in Minneapolis) a few years back, I knew this very talented man was due for bigger and better things which is now clear in “Into Temptation”. As such his film is introspective and redemptive, not draped in evanescence or sensationalism.

Father John Buerlein (Jeremy Sisto), in the confessional presumably on a Saturday afternoon, a woman enters the confessional (the side with the screen) and begins to tell the priest that it’s been years since her last confession. Since she feels her life is no longer of value, she plans to commit suicide on her birthday (which is soon), then walks out of the confessional before Father Buerlein can complete the sacrament with absolution. He’s bothered by what she said but under church law cannot reveal a name and what he or she said. He becomes his own Sherlock Holmes at the risk of endangering his life, or opening himself to scandal or misunderstanding by his flock, his bishop, and/or his encounters with some louche characters.

Attempting to find the mystery woman, Linda Salerno (Kristen Chenoweth), [“Running with Scissors” (2006), “Bewitched”, (2005)] the priest asks his parishioner Lloyd Mantao (Bruce A Young) to assist him. Both men find her apartment but learn she has recently moved out. The hunt goes on; the priest goes alone at times, visiting a sex shop to inquire if anyone there knows her. The priest and Lloyd visit a pimp named James St. Claire (Ansa Akyea), who knows Linda but hasn’t seen her recently.

“Into Temptation” is similar to Irvin Kershner’s 1961 film, “The Hoodlum Priest” where a Jesuit priest (Don Murray) works with ex-cons, prostitutes and juvenile delinquents in St. Louis.

Walking down a seedy street, Father Buerlein sees a distinguished gentleman talking to a woman. He enters the restaurant, and sits down but notices a few minutes later the woman leaves. Father Buerlein, when not at his parish saying mass or addressing one of the church groups, is almost obsessed with finding Linda before she commits suicide. He asks what to do of fellow priest, Father Ralph O’Brien (Brian Baumgartner) at another parish, without revealing Linda’s name. The private conversations between the two priests – though about forgiving Linda, as if in a sacramental sense,- may be an impropriety.

Patrick Coyle’s characters are working class, everyday people. To Coyle’s credit he keeps the story simple, seldom veering from the course of the movie. Father Buerlein struggles with his vocation at times, especially when a woman whom he had dated before his entrance to the Catholic seminary re-appears at his church. He understands internal struggles even though his are different from the woman he is trying to rescue.

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La Natividad Returns

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Outdoor candle-lit procession with Maria and Jose in La Natividad, In the Heart of the Beast Theatre

by Patrick Cabello Hansel
One of the most unique partnerships in the arts takes place literally in our backyard: La Natividad, the bilingual Christmas procession and celebration that is a partnership between In the Heart of the Beast Puppet and Mask Theatre (HOBT), St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church and Mercado Central marketplace. La Natividad will return this December 10 – 20 to our community. This beloved holiday show combines street theatre, HOBT’s expressive puppetry, and an outdoor candle-lit procession. Based on the Mexican tradition of Las Posadas, the audience moves from place to place and becomes part of the action.

Beginning at HOBT’s Theater and Mercado Central, the audience follows Maria and José through the streets as they look for refuge. The procession ends at St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, with the Nativity and a fiesta— complete with music and food. Tickets for this unique performance and holiday celebration are on sale now, by calling 612-721-2535 or on-line.

But perhaps even more important, community members can be a part of the show by being actors, puppeteers, singing in the angel choir or volunteering at one of the fiestas. There are plenty of roles for children as well. If interested, please contact the theater at 612-721-2535 or St. Paul’s at 612-724-3862.

Patrick Cabello Hansel, creative & amiable poet, author, dramatist, and pastor (and so, too, Luisa Cabello Hansel) St. Paul’s Lutheran Church – 28th Street and 15th Ave. in Midtown Phillips. Writes a new Chapter for Novelle Searching in each month’s The Alley.

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Dave’s Dumpster November 2009

Dave's Dumpster November 2009

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