NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Saturday June 24th 2017

Keep citizen journalism alive!

Donatebutton_narrow

Archives

The Alley Newspaper in collaboration with the American Swedish Institute’s ANNUAL NEIGHBORHOOD OPEN HOUSE

flyerv2-1

Join in with the other community members on Wednesday, December 14th from 5 to 8 pm to celebrate another year of The Alley Newspaper.  Give your opinion of what you like about The Alley and how it can improve.

Attend the American Swedish Institute’s FREE Neighborhood Night and enjoy the festive Scandinavian holiday activites in this former Swedish newspaper family’s “castle” at 2600 Park Avenue. Review The Alley Newspaper’s work of 2016 and cast your vote  about the Alley Newspaper’s future!

The Alley Newspaper in collaboration with
the American Swedish Institute’s
ANNUAL NEIGHBORHOOD OPEN HOUSE

FREE !

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

5:00 to 8:00 pm

American Swedish Institute
2600 Park Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55407

Questions or more info: editor@alleynews.org

P.O. Box 7006 Mpls., MN 55407

or 612-990-4022

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Nordic Holidays: Celebrations of Light Exhibition Nov. 12 to January 8 2017

ASI Turnblad Family Mansion on a Winter Night at 2600 Park Avenue

ASI Turnblad Family Mansion on a Winter Night at 2600 Park Avenue

ASI Holiday Rooms Public Tours

Daily, Tu–Sun Nov. 15, 2016 – Jan. 8, 2017

Enjoy a popular Mpls. holiday destination;  Holiday Rooms, of Nordic traditions from homes of Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Iceland, Finland & a room honoring Hanukkah by the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota & the Dakotas. Incl with Museum adm.

Aurora Borealis Series–Photographs by Jim Brandenburg: striking images from 30 years with National Geographic; loaned by Sivertson Gallery, Grand Marais, MN.

The Royal Copenhagen / Bing & Grøndahl Handpainted Christmas Plates 1895 to 2016. (donated by Mary Jane Thompson).

Lantern Lit Glögg Tours

6:30–8 pm Sat Dec. 3, Sun Dec. 11, Fr Dec. 23 & Sat Jan. 7, 2017. Explore Mansion decorated rooms. with glögg, a warm, mulled wine, & seasonal appetizers from FIKA. $50 ASI members / $55 non-members. 21+

Making Traditions weekend series of family music & handcraft  Dec 3-4, 11 & 18. Generously supported by Mike & Barb Nelson.

Julmarknad: Market & Festival Sat Dec. 3, 10 am–5 pm; Sun Dec. 4, Noon–5 pm With jewelry, glass, clothing, wood, & ceramic gift items by local artists; alongside ASI’s Store & Jul Shop. Enjoy music, dance & storytelling. Make slöjd (handcraft) projects & watch for tomte & Santa! Sample FIKA’s delectable holiday menu, p glögg & Bake Sale. Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

November 2016 Alley Newspaper

november-2016-web-1

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

PHOENIX NUMBER III

BY PATRICK CABELLO HANSEL

In this issue, you will find the 3rd edition of The Phoenix of Phillips: writings by your neighbors who tell their story and the story of our community.  You will meet writers as young as 11 and writers who are well into their seventies.  All of them have a hope for a loving and beautiful community.  Here are some youth poems that didn’t make this edition, around the theme of “Stop!”

Stop the violence in the community

Stop hurting kids in the world

Stop killing black people, police!

And you can trust some white

And black police officers

Stop racism towards African-American males

Frank

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Roger Buffalohead May 30, 1939 – September 6, 2016: A Great Life Remembered

”My English name is Roger Buffalohead. My Ponca name is Insta dupa, which means Four Eyes. It refers to a very ancient Ponca dog. It had yellow markings above its eyes. At a distance it looked like it had four eyes. It was a very honorific name. In the Ponca clans you inherit a clan name. When you pass on your name goes back into the clan pool. The next born would get your name . We don’t really know how old those names are but they go back many, many, many generations. Buffalohead is an English translation of Te Nugah pah, which means people at the head of the buffalo ceremony. Some lazy BIA clerk decided that that was too long of a name to put on a form. He shortened it to Buffalohead and that became our name and has remained our name in modern times.”

”My English name is Roger Buffalohead. My Ponca name is Insta dupa, which means Four Eyes. It refers to a very ancient Ponca dog. It had yellow markings above its eyes. At a distance it looked like it had four eyes. It was a very honorific name. In the Ponca clans you inherit a clan name. When you pass on your name goes back into the clan pool. The next born would get your name . We don’t really know how old those names are but they go back many, many, many generations. Buffalohead is an English translation of Te Nugah pah, which means people at the head of the buffalo ceremony. Some lazy BIA clerk decided that that was too long of a name to put on a form. He shortened it to Buffalohead and that became our name and has remained our name in modern times.”

BY LAURA WATERMAN WITTSTOCK

Roger and Priscilla Buffalohead came to Minneapolis with their young son in 1970. A Department of American Indian Studies was being created and the talent seekers wanted the young and gifted man from the Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma to take the position of chair. It was a moment of pride for all of Indian Country and students came from several nations to study at the University of Minnesota.

Roger and Priscilla met at the University of Wisconsin where they were both graduate students and Roger and Priscilla’s brother were taking a class from Dr. David A. Baerreis, a professor known for his environmentally oriented research of human behavior. Priscilla’s brother introduced them and they were astonished to discover that they were next-door neighbors! They married in 1965 and the Wisconsin Alumnae noted the wedding. Their son Eric was born later that year. His English name came from his mother and his Ponca name came from his great grandfather. Both Priscilla and Roger were graduate students, working on their PhDs, and taking turns caring for baby Eric. Roger fashioned a cardboard box into a rocker so he could place the baby in the box and rock him while he studied.

The University of Cincinnati recruited both of them so with unfinished academic study, they moved to Ohio. Then UCLA in California wanted Roger for a one-year special chair and from there it was on to Minnesota. Daughter Julie was born in Minneapolis: named again by Mom in English and for a great aunt of the Ponca Tribe.

Roger was never far from his family in Oklahoma, although. He had been at home with his family until he graduated from high school and went on to Oklahoma State University in Stillwater, a distance of only 40 miles by car, it was also seemingly a world apart. Like many young men of the times, he worked to earn his board and to pay for what scholarships would not cover. Then he got a scholarship to the University of Wisconsin and he was truly far away from his family. They never stopped asking him to come home. The pursuit of higher education was not as important as the bonds of family, in their eyes, although they all felt great pride in their learned son.

For the rest of his professional career, when he could not take his family and visit his home in Oklahoma, he carried the stories of his youth into lessons and conversations with his students and friends. His Ponca identity became an asset and example of how to navigate the foreign worlds of academe or just life far away from one’s home reservation.

After six years at the University of Minnesota, Roger took a one-year assignment at Washington State in Pullman, Washington and was then recruited to Duluth, back at the U of M. From there he went to Santa Fe, New Mexico to the Institute of American Indian Arts to build a new art school from its skeletal beginnings. Then he came back to Minnesota and took a big chance by taking on a new program that promised to help younger Native students succeed in school by learning the tools of communication and having success with the very earliest computers available in 1983. Roger’s magic touch with students worked with high school students as well. They wanted to learn but so much was getting in the way. Roger found ways to move some of those obstacles and to be there as a promise that there was someone to lean on. Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

OPEN LETTER TO COMMUNITY: We must safeguard precious human lives

BY MOHAMED FARAH

Dear friends, fellow neighbors, and community members,

I write to you today with a heavy heart to first send condolences to the families who have lost their loved ones in the recent tragic shooting in our neighborhood. It was only 24 hours prior to this incident when I was with residents at Stewart Park having lunch after a day of cleaning the neighborhood.

It is vital that we have a real conversation about violence in our neighborhood and ways to keep our children and loved ones safe. This past week I have been reflecting on how we can make our community safe and enriching.

As a parent of two little ones, this recent shooting gave me nightmares and I have been reevaluating how safe my family is in our community. I have real concern for the safety of my children, other children, and my fellow community members in Ward 9.

As we all know human life is precious and we should do everything in our power to safeguard the lives of our neighbors and fellow community members.

I have no doubt that you are as concerned as I am about recent violent incidents. That is why I feel that we must set a new direction as a Ward when it comes to the safety of our community.

Safety has to be a top priority moving forward and we must stand up and take ownership of our issues.  As a community we can do much and reach far if our voices are united.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

14th Annual Phillips Clean Sweep A Huge Success! 

14566238_1112678198840157_257207821281089264_oBY JANA METGE and BRAD PASS

On Saturday October 8th over 800 Phillips residents gathered to clean up their neighborhoods. Phillips Clean Sweep is a Partnership of the East Phillips Improvement Coalition, Phillips West Neighborhood Organization, Little Earth of United Tribes, Ventura Village, and City of Minneapolis Solid Waste & Recycling. Picking up Litter is second to the Community Building!

Folks met for breakfast, picked up supplies, and met their neighbors at LSS 2400 Park Ave. or Welna Hardware on Bloomington Ave.  400 T-Shirts were given to volunteers which list the year’s donors and a new design by T-Shirt Contest Winner Jennifer Gomez, East Phillips resident, De LaSalle student and Banyan Member.

Trash Pick-Up Teams were assigned to every block.  6 Drivers and Garbage Trucks are hired to cover each neighborhood plus Specialty pick-ups. This is a service to the neighborhood, all free of charge.

2016 Trash Total Results:

Ventura Village – 8,260 lbs.

Phillips West – 2,560 lbs.

Midtown Phillips – 11,340 lbs.

East Phillips – 10,700 lbs. 

2 Specialty Trucks (tires, old furniture, household construction, electronics, appliances, and metal):

West Side Phillips

4,600 lbs. metal, 10 TV’s, 3 Appliances, 20 Tires.

East Side Phillips

4,000 lbs. metal, 16 TV’s, 9 Appliances, 57 Tire.

That’s a total of 41,460 lbs. of trash plus TV’s, appliances, and tires. 20 lbs of compost was collected three food services from feeding 800 people twice!

At noon the volunteers gathered at Stewart Park for lunch.  VJ Smith and Mad Dads broadcasted music and BB-Que-d, Bethlehem Baptist provided sandwiches, chips, & bars and Banyan students served the lunch.  Solid Waste & Recycling and  Compost Initiative had Info Tables. Clean City Coordinator Michelle Howard and City Compost Champion Kellie Kish were there to answer all questions!  The New American Youth Soccer Club was on hand to explain their activities.

The Phillips Clean Sweep Planning Team meets weekly from mid-August thru Clean Sweep. We are always looking for more planning team members, organizations to participate, and folks to come out for the morning litter pick up!

The Team sought and managed $7,400. of cash donations totaling and In-Kind donations estimated at another $7,000 from our many generous sponsors.

This GREAT event could not occur but for our generous Sponsors who provide both cash and In-Kind Contributions – AND – all of you, our Neighborhood Volunteers!  Thank you All!!

See you all next year 2nd Sat., October 14th, 2017!  

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Ornate tree trunk tombstone: Recalls All Saints Day death and symbolism

russell-nelsonmarker-01

A six-foot tree of sandstone with ferns and ivy has concentric rings etched at sawn-off branches. There is a cross near the top and a scroll carved with the birth and death dates.

By Sue Hunter Weir

Nels H. Nelson Russell died on November 2, 1898.  His marker, a six-foot tall tree carved from sandstone, is one of the most distinctive in the cemetery.  Stone ferns grow at the base of the tree and ivy is twined around its trunk.    Concentric rings are etched at the ends of the tree’s sawn-off branches.  There is a cross made of interlocking branches near the top of the tree, and beneath it, suspended by a stone rope, is a scroll that is carved with the birth and death dates of Mr. Russell and his wife Christina.

Mr. Russell died on All Saints Day, a fact that is inscribed on his marker.  It is a holy day that is observed in many forms by a variety of religious denominations throughout the world.  Regardless of where or when the observation takes place the intention is the same—to acknowledge the goodness and love of those who have gone before.  It is about more than merely remembering, it is about renewing the connection between the living and the dead.

The reference to All Saints Day on this marker also tells us something about the nature of Nels and Christina Russell and the family members who wanted others to remember them.  The words “His Son Erected this Memorial” are carved near the base of the tree.  That son, Nels J. Russell, was Nels H. and Christina’s only surviving son.  He worked as an insurance salesman but more importantly, was one of the founding members of Minneapolis’ St.Ansgarius Swedish Episcopal Church in Minneapolis.

The Russell family came to the United States from Sweden in 1879.  Nels H., the father, was born in 1818 and was 61 years old when they came to the United States.  His wife, Christina, was 48.  They came with three of their children:  Mathilda (born in 1859), Maria Nitilia (born in 1863) and Nels J. (born in 1864).  Census records indicate that the family had many more children but that only those three survived. Apparently, the children who did not survive died before the family left Sweden.

It is difficult to trace the family during their early years in the United States.  The family seems to have changed their last name from Nelson to Russell at some point, most likely because Nelson was such a common last name (there were 95 Nels Nelsons in Minneapolis in 1898). Christina’s legal name appears to have been Johanna, a name that is engraved on the marker and listed in cemetery records, but in all other records she is known as Christina.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

The Burma Shave Historic Vine Church Legacy

By Steve Sandberg

The City of Minneapolis Heritage Preservation Commission voted 7-2 Tuesday to approve the Minneapolis Public Schools application for demolition of the historic Vine Church/Hugnad Hall/Winget Manufacturing/Burma Vita building at 2019 East Lake Street in Minneapolis. Commissioners Hunter Weir and Olson voted no. Save the Shave is considering an appeal.

Save the Shave reps Steve Sandberg, Shari Albers, Erin Berg and David West all presented various, historical, environmental, educational and cultural reasons for saving the building and other neighbors spoke up and showed up as well but in the end the politics of money and convenience prevailed over history and imagination.

Many of the Commissioners voiced respect for the rich history of the building and were not aware that the Winget Manufacturing started there with its owner Nell Walter Winget who patented several hat, clothing and undergarment designs and built a predominantly women employed company into a growing and successful concern. At the same time as women got the right to vote Nell Winget was running a nationally recognized business and later developed the Kickernick Building in downtown Minneapolis. The Commissioners seemed to agonize over how to preserve tangible history or possible artifacts from the demolition site even as they voted to destroy it.

Ironically, the staff report to the Commission did finally acknowledge that the building met one of its criteria for historical importance on the same day as the Commission voted to demolish it. Several commissioners thought that it was just too late to save the building at 2019 East Lake.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

EPIC Report-November 2016

epicallyreportfornovember2016b

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
 Page 16 of 151  « First  ... « 14  15  16  17  18 » ...  Last »