NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Thursday September 20th 2018

Keep citizen journalism alive!

Donatebutton_narrow

Archives

Phillips Community Center at 2323 11th Ave building Update

by Robert Albee

The Phillips Community Parks Initiative members met on Tuesday, December 14th with MPRB President John Erwin, Commissioner Scott Vreeland, Jayne Miller, the new MPRB Superintendent and with Al Bangoura, the CSA #6 Director that serves the Phillips Community. This meeting gave the PCPI members an opportunity to determine what the MPRB Commissioners were considering and review any concerns that were raised during earlier individual visits with each MPRB commissioner.. Feedback from the meeting was very positive, indicating that there would be some parameters established by the Park Board that once addressed could lead to a signing of leases for space within the Phillips Community Center.

The next day, on Wednesday, December 15th, the MPRB Planning Committee sponsored a presentation by PCPI members to formally outline and present the overall plan and request for space in the Phillips Community Center facility. This presentation was designed to provide the basic information to any interested media producer/writer and an opportunity to present the plan via cable television on Channel 79. PCPI’s presentation was met with unanimous praise and encouragement. The next and final formal step in the process will be to appear before the entire Minneapolis Park & Recreation Board on Wednesday, January 5, 2011. At this time the board will choose to ratify the recommendation of the Planning Committee to go forward with the proposed leasing and space utilization proposal

PCPI proponents are requesting that the building become available by March 1, 2011. The MPRB is currently removing all carpeting and ceiling tiles and will be repainting the common areas prior to any lease ups of the facility.

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Health providers and community development organizations invited to work with Back Yard community

By Janice Barbee, Cultural Wellness Center

Looking back over the activities and accomplishments of 2010, the partners of the Backyard Initiative have a lot to celebrate. The residents of the Backyard (Phillips, Powderhorn Park, Central, and Corcoran) and Allina Hospitals and Clinics are creating a new kind of partnership to improve the health of the community.

On December 10, the Cultural Wellness Center and Allina hosted a breakfast for CHAT members and other guests to learn about the Backyard Initiative and meet Dr. David Kindig, Emeritus Professor of Population Health Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Medicine. Dr. Kendig shared Hennepin County’s scores from the County Health Rankings which ranks the overall health of every county in the U.S. (available on www.countyhealthrankings.org). The report, released by the University of Wisconsin’s Population Health Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is the first of its kind to measure the state of health of a county based on health measures and other key factors that affect health, such as smoking, obesity, binge drinking, access to primary care providers, rates of high school graduation, rates of violent crime, air pollution levels, liquor store density, unemployment rates and number of children living in poverty. A list of such measures, chosen by community residents, could be a tool to help the Backyard residents assess the health of the Backyard community.

Marcus Thygeson, MD, president of the Center for Healthcare Innovation at Allina Hospitals & Clinics (the Backyard Initiative is an initiative of this Center) spoke about the need for a “new frontier” of corporate and community partnership. This partnership is not the traditional “we will help you” model, but listens to the community’s voice, ideas, and self-interests. It’s not about Allina being the experts or knowing best – it’s about honoring all the experts in the room. He said that the BYI is about building capacity to improve the community’s health, and that capacity building needs to be both within the community and within Allina.

Thygeson stated, “We want to build a model where patients are autonomous, co-creators of their own health and that of the systems they are part of, which includes family, community and culture. In order to see true improvements in health, we must find a way to address the social and environmental determinants of health. As health care providers, we can’t do this by ourselves – we must partner with our patients and our community to figure this out together. The Backyard Initiative is part of Allina’s strategy to change the way that we operate. Through the BYI we are gaining new capabilities and tools to support our patients.”

Thygeson and Atum Azzahir, Executive Director of the Cultural Wellness Center, extended an invitation to guests from other health and community development organizations to help change the way health care and corporations relate to and work with community residents, and to the community residents in the room to help change the way community relates to corporations and health care.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, 127 Hours & Tangled

by Howard McQuitter II

HowardMcQuitterii@yahoo.com

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
****1/2
Warner Brothers
Fantasy/Drama/Thriller
Lagoon
Running Time: 146 minutes
Rated: PG-13
Director: David Yates

The trio: Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson and Rupert Grint are grown up now. We’ve watched these lovely children grow up through seven (2 parts) Harry Potter films and four directors. In the seventh Harry Potter film, the principal cast (and lesser cast too) are away from the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. They’re on the run, with Harry Potter being sought after as the principal enemy. Harry Potter (Daniel Radcliffe), Hermione Granger (Emma Watson) and Ron Weasley (Rupert Grint) are entrusted with a most dangerous quest: seek and destroy Lord Voldemort’s secret to immortality – the Horcruxes.

The sense of playfulness with Harry, Hermione, and Ron in previous movies is all but gone in “Deadly Hallows”. Their lives are in danger, fearing their nemesis Lord Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes) will appear at any time. An awkward if not fairly predictable love triangle surfaces in very subtle ways. The trickles of love, however present, do not in any way overshadow the plot. The magic continues as Harry, Hermione, and Ron fight off ambushes and confrontations.

In the beginning of “Deadly Hallows” Hagrid (Robbie Coltrane) rescues Harry from a well-organized Death Eaters assault. That scene is the most action packed in “Deadly Hallows”. For the most part the film seeks much calmer moments.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Food and Lack of Nutrition

By Randall Gray

For over the last 20 years I have noticed the foods I eat are getting to taste less and less as it should. I’ve quit eating anything from a can, fast food restaurants (a.k.a. McDonald’s, Burger King or any one of the sort), any food that is microwaveable or pre-made.

While growing up, over 90 percent of the foods we ate were not pre-made, frozen or stuffed with so many ingredients that when you try to pronounce them, it seems like you’re just trying to say some glorified word for a particle that you would rather use to adhere wallpaper to the wall. What ever happened to the ingredients on the package stating “fruit or vegetable, salt or sugar, vinegar or water? Have we wanted to preserve so much of our bodies that we have to add these chemicals to our foods? With all these different preservatives in our foods and the rise of all the different health issues we have now, isn’t there a connection between the two? Years ago kids were not on medication for ADHD; it didn’t exist! What are these chemicals doing to us, our bodies and our society?

Let’s look at what has changed from 1940 to now. You very rarely heard of anyone getting E-coli poisoning. Restaurants actually slapped the burger patties together and threw them on the grill. French fries were made from potatoes that came out of the ground—peeled, sliced, and deep fried. Salads were made from a fresh head of lettuce with dressings that were made from everything that was not loaded with processed anything.

Now to what we have today…over 98 percent of all fast food restaurants have their food brought into the restaurant that has been pre-made in some factory, with additives, preservative and fillers that help enhance the food’s taste. Yes, that’s right! Additives to help enhance the food’s taste!

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

What Democracy Looks Like

by Peter Molenaar

From the November/December issue of “Teamster” magazine:

Did you know that more than 750 Teamster women recently marched through downtown Minneapolis, coloring the city in a sea of pink and black rally signs? The chant “We’re Teamsters! We fight! We fight for workers’ rights!” was amplified by sky-scraper acoustics. The refrain “Workers ‘Yes’, Wall Street ‘No’” echoed…

The photo-journalist who covered the 2010 Teamsters Women’s Conference depicted the event with a multi-racial/multi-national collage. One beaming face was adorned by the Muslim hajib. Message: no order of prejudicial exclusion is to be tolerated by our union movement.

Did you know that some 600 Teamsters National Black Caucus members recently walked gallantly through the streets of Washington, D.C.? “Civil rights and workers’ rights go hand-in hand” was the theme. The 47th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s “I Have A Dream” speech was commemorated.

Truthfully, every page of the “Teamster” depicts the face of democracy.

In his lead article “Corporations Vs. Working Americans”, General President James P. Hoffa states:

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

January 2011 Daves’ Dumpster

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Food Obsession: FOOD AND CLASS

Recently I read an article in the November 29 Newsweek that claimed that eating habits and tastes are the new dividers of social class in America. Well-off people can choose pure, organic, out-of-season and hard-to-find-foods, as they have access to high-end stores that carry these things and the money to buy them when they are there. These foods are usually nutritious, delicious and satisfying. One woman cited in the article felt she was doing her part to make the world a better place by demanding such foods for herself and her family. Meanwhile, the poor go to a convenience store or a huge supermarket and get the cheapest foods sold in quantity and featured in coupons and price deals, foods that give quick satisfaction, little real nutrition and a load of calories.

It doesn’t have to be this way. At Cedar Food and Grill, the grocery store at East 26th Street and Cedar Avenue, “Mo” is making sure that there are fresh fruits and vegetables and other wholesome foods available for his mostly low-income customers. Wholesome foods, some even organic, can be found at some huge supermarkets. Your backyard or community garden will yield organic and locally grown foods. Canning and freezing will make them last, with none wasted. (Since an experience canning a pint of tomatoes in junior high school home ec class, I haven’t canned any foods. I should read up on it and try it again.) Eating less meat, cooking at home oftener also make for tasty, nutritious dinners – and you know what went into your finished product.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Searching – A Serial Novelle Chapter 22: “For whatever might come”

By Patrick Cabello Hansel

By the time they reached Ingebretsen’s there was a line out the store, down the block in front of the poster collective and La Que Buena, all the way around the corner on 17th. Angel’s Mom and Dad decided to go to the Mercado Central rather than wait in line, but Angel and Luz were curious to see what this great fuss was about.

When they got to the end of the line, they stood behind an elderly couple, holding hands and smiling. The woman nodded at them and said something that sounded to Angel like “Lotten barn in”. There was that word again: lotten. He had heard it from the strange man in the park; the waitress at Maria’s had told him it meant “Let”. Let the barn in?” Angel thought. What is that supposed to mean?

The woman noticed the perplexed look on Angel’s face and said, “Don’t worry; it’s an old Santa Lucia day blessing. You two do know it’s Santa Lucia Day, don’t you?”

“Yes!” Luz said, “That’s why we’re here! But what are all these people doing in line?” she asked.

“Buying lutefisk, my dear”, the older gentleman said.

“Lutefisk?” Angel said. “What is lutefisk?” He was beginning to tire from so many foreign words.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Bartered Health Care Fails in court

George Strebel died from heart disease on October 21, 1916. His body was held in the cemetery’s vault for eight months, then buried, only to be exhumed shortly after for identification by sisters from whom he had severed all ties decades earlier. He is buried to the left of the small obelisk.

by Sue Hunter Weir

A word of warning—don’t write your last will and testament on wallpaper and expect it to stand up in court. That’s especially true if you don’t want your relatives to inherit your money. George Strebel may (or may not) have done just that, and it led to what the Minneapolis Tribune called “one of the most unusual inheritance cases ever brought into the Hennepin County Courts.”

George Strebel died from heart disease on October 21, 1916. For the next eight months, his body was held in the cemetery’s vault while county officials attempted to locate his relatives. After eight months of fruitless searching, he was finally buried in Layman’s Cemetery. Shortly afterward, two women, who claimed to be Strebel’s sisters, came forward. His body was exhumed and the two sisters identified Strebel’s remains by a malformation of one of his hands. Neither of the women had seen their brother in over 30 years. Ironically, he had severed all ties with his family over what he believed to be an unfair division of his family’s property.

For the last six years of his life, Strebel had lived at the Pacific Hotel, which was located at 226 Washington Avenue North. He was in poor health much of that time and was cared for by the hotel’s staff who he regarded as being his real family. He developed his own unique method of getting the health care that he needed–he promised those who cared for him that they would be his heirs. Unfortunately, he did it in a series of wills, naming first one person, then another. A handful of those wills survived and became evidence in probate court. If there was one thing that those who worked in the hotel agreed on, however, it was that Strebel didn’t want his family to inherit his $6,000.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

January Programs at the Franklin Library

By Erin Thomasson

Children’s Programs

Family Storytime
Wed. Feb. 23, 10:30 –11 a.m.
Age 2 & up. Share books, stories, rhymes, music, and movement with your children.

Waxbarasho iyo Ciyaar Caruureed Af-Soomaali ah/Somali Play and Learn
Fri., thru Jan. 7 & 14, 10:30a.m.–12:30 p.m. Preschool-grade 2. Dhammaan caruurta ka yar da’ dugsi. Ka soo qaybgal sheekooyin caruur, heeso iyo hawlo waxbarasho. Soo bandhigidda barnaamijkan waxaa lala kaashaday Join us for stories, songs and activities. *

Sheeko Caruur Af-Soomaali ah/World Language Storytime: Somali Tues. thru Feb. 22, 6–7 p.m. La wadaag bugagga, sheekoyinka, jaan-gooyada maansada iyo muusikada Soomaalida. Mashruucaan waxaa lagu maalgaliyey lacag ka timid tage Fund. Age 2 and up. Experience the world in other languages. **

Celebrate Winter
Fri. Jan. 21, 4–5 p.m. Grade 2 and up. Join us for winter-themed stories and crafts!

Kids Book Club
Fri., Jan. 28, 4–5 p.m. Grades 4-6. Join other kids to talk about a great book! No pre-reading required. We will read a book and discuss.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
 Page 160 of 182  « First  ... « 158  159  160  161  162 » ...  Last »