NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Monday July 16th 2018

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Losing our Assets: A Plea For Help!

By Robert Albee

I started out trying to tell a story about Ancient Traders, the East Franklin Avenue strip mall across the street from my house, but wise counsel prevailed and pointed out too many holes, inaccuracies and inflammatory language in that draft so it is better to start afresh. So this story is more of an editorial than a narrative, as it awaits a true storyteller with more time and access to facts than I possess.

This piece begins with a plea to our state elected officials—Senator Berglin and Representative Clark and our county and municipal officials, Peter McLaughlin, Robert Lilligren and Gary Schiff— requesting that we begin a forensics investigation into the practice using one property to leverage another when public monies were originally used and were obtained to serve a given locality. In a shifting economy, this conduct has the makings to destabilize an area that was only recently stabilized, with investments of more than $130 million and crime rates dropping along the East Franklin Avenue corridor.

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Great Granddaughter ‘Uprights” Legacy and Its Marker for Another Century

By Sue Hunter Weir

Setting grave markers is a tough business. Wrestling blocks of stone that weigh several hundreds of pounds into place requires muscle and planning. Ensuring that the stones are level when the ground is uneven is tricky and tree roots don’t make the job any easier. On Sunday, August 22nd, staff from Grave Groomers, a local restoration company, set about repairing the marker for Lina Quam.

Mrs. Quam’s marker is in the center island of the cemetery. Someone (it isn’t clear who) planted a tree between her marker and the marker directly north of hers. It probably seemed like a good idea at the time. But over a hundred years later, the cottonwood is still there and still growing. As the tree has grew, its widening trunk caused the top of Mrs. Quam’s obelisk-shaped marker to list, and within the last five years toppled it altogether.

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SEARCHING – a Serial Novelle CHAPTER 18: Truth, in all its profound beauty and terror.

By Patrick Cabello Hansel

Coffee, pancakes, the smiles and shouts of people who love you—who cares if you’re celebrating the Feast Day of the Virgen de Guadalupe, the patroness of Mexico and all the Americas—sitting in a sticky booth at Denny’s at 11:22 pm.

This is the crowd that greeted Angel & his dad, Augusto: the Luz, the light of his life, her grandmother Dolores, Mr. Bussey, his old teacher from Roosevelt, Mother Light the healer, and her helper Ana. They were seated under two signs that had yellowed with age. One read: Between 10pm and 5pm, minimum order $3.00, maximum stay 2 hours. The other: No Card Playing in This Restaurant. Angel was going to ask if card playing was allowed in other Denny’s, but as he began to form the words, Mr. Bussey and Mother Light each pulled out a deck and began shuffling.

“What shall we play?” Mr. Bussey asked. “Bid Whist? Buck Euchre? Pinochle?”

“Clabber? Skat? Bourré?” Mother Light chimed in.

“¿Conquian? ¿Siete Loco? ¿Burro Castigado?” laughed Dolores.

“Hey, wait a minute!” Angel laughed. “It says “No Card Playing in This Restaurant! You’re going to get us kicked out before we even eat!”

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“Tell Me a Story”…in Kathleen Anderson’s Words

Kathleen Anderson, longtime district director for Congressman Martin Sabo, who lived in Longfellow Neighborhood growing up.

Lake Street Council is working hard this year to collect and promote the history of this area. The first stage to this project is collecting oral histories of longtime residents. Here’s part of the interview with Kathleen Anderson, longtime district director for Congressman Martin Sabo, who lived in Longfellow growing up. Please visit youtube.com/VisitLakeStreet to watch the whole video interview with Kathleen and others! And if you are a longtime resident who remembers well the Lake Street from decades past, and would like your story recorded, please get in touch with us! Call 612-824-7420 or email coien@lakestreetcouncil.org.

By Kathleen Anderson as told to Chris Oien

I lived on 39th St. & 44th Ave., which is about 9 blocks from Lake Street, and several blocks from the river. Mostly we would ride our bikes, or I would take the 42nd Ave. bus to about 36th St. and then transfer to the Lake Street bus. Sometimes we’d go east toward the river, there was an ice cream shop, I believe it was a Bridgeman’s, for ice cream. Or, we would take the bus to the west toward the Uptown area and the lakes. We would stop sometimes at the Town Talk, which was there. We were into picture taking as teenagers, and we would have our film developed on the second floor of the building above the Town Talk.

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Food Obsession: THERE’S NOTHING TO EAT AROUND HERE!

by Jane Thomson

Above is the frequent lament heard from my son Randall, some 25 year ago, when he would come home from high school and look into the refrigerator. If he was looking for sugared soda pop or chips with greasy dip, he was right. Or perhaps my daughter’s six-foot-five-inch boyfriend Doug had beat Randall to the snacks (“Thanks, Mrs. Thomson – the cookies were great!”). Years later when my son was a young husband and father, and I was baby-sitting Ella (now 17), I would open his fridge, see leaves, roots and strange grains, and say to myself “There’s nothing to eat around here.” And there are people who can look into the fridge (if they have one), any time, assess that there’s nothing to eat, and be correct. Someone please write more about this!

The point I am leading up to is that if possible there should be some wholesome and interesting food for kids to eat when they come home from school. They may have eaten lunch at 11 a.m.. Some may go right to a job after the snack (if they can get jobs). Some kids may have extra-curricular activities after school and be really hungry when they get home. A family dinner later is the ideal. The above-mentioned Randall or Doug could have eaten the following foods after school and still have been hungry at 6 p.m. Both recipes are from the S’Trib, eons ago.

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Winter’s Bone & Despicable Me

Winter's Bone

By Howard McQuitter

Winter’s Bone
*****
Anonymous Content
Drama/Thriller
Uptown
Running Time: 100 minutes
Rated: R
Director: Debra Granik

If ever there was a heroine from opening to closing scene in a film, it’s a new actress named Jennifer Lawrence, 18. Her character Ree Dolly lives in the Ozarks of Missouri, a harsh country with tin can houses, junk cars in backyards, an occasional horse or cow, and in this backwater, more than a few dogs.

Miss Dolly has plenty on her plate, taking care of two younger siblings, Sonny (Isaiah Stone) and Ashlee (Ashlee Thompson) and a mentally incompetent mother. Times are so hard Ree gives her horse Ginger, who hasn’t eaten in four days, to her neighbor Sonya (Shelley Waggener). Ree is saddened by leaving her horse in another’s care.

When Sheriff Baskin (Garret Dillahurt) shows up at Ree’s front yard, asking for her dad, Jessup, who may have slipped bail after being arrested for setting up a meth lab, she tells him she doesn’t know where he is.

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An urban first home for roots, commitment, and creativity A Community Investment

Tell-Tales signs of home improvement to this unique house and setting by first-time home buyers Lotus Lofgren and Ian McNamara have many stories of their laborious efforts and also joys. In addition to projects remaining on the house, they continue to do landscaping including adding the brick colimns across the front and some at rear. They need more bricks to continue the columns across the front of recently added sideyard that will also become a community garden. Truly a great addition to our accolades called Kudos Homes and Gardens!

by Lotus Lofgren

In all, we looked at over one hundred properties. Every weekend we would create etch-a-sketch lines across town, peering in broken windows, walking through abandoned yards where the grass grew past my knees, and sheepishly apologizing to current renters as we disrupted their day, tiptoed around their child’s play things and wondered where they would go once someone bought the place.

The houses held stories, old stories that we would never know, and others more recent and potent; an orange home that had suffered years at the hands of absentee landlords, been foreclosed on and left its tenants homeless. They scrawled their anger on the lime green walls, words written with human feces and punctuated with urine, a two story white house with all of the upper unit windows blown out from a grease fire in the kitchen. I won’t forget the charred women’s shoes, still hanging on a rack attached to half a closet door. A yellow house where the previous owners– enraged at the bank that took their home from them, the same bank now trying to sell the house– had hidden a package of spareribs under the cupboards, months ago, and the smell of rotting flesh permeated the drywall. The bank didn’t even try to clean it up.

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Seward Co-Op Creates Rating for Excellence and Cooperative Ethics “Principle Six” “preferred products” Debuts Oct. 2

by Lindsey Frey and Tom Vogel

Seward Co-op Grocery & Deli launches a new product rating system October 2nd that highlights products from small, local farmers and producers, as well as cooperative businesses. Going beyond the expected “organic” and “local” labeling, conscientious shoppers can select and purchase items produced in the most responsible ways possible.

Principle Six (P6) is an initiative created by Seward Co-op and five consumer grocery cooperatives nationwide in partnership with Equal Exchange, a worker-owned cooperative encourage consumers to use purchasing dollars to support small, local farmers and producers, as well as cooperative businesses.

“Historically, many co-op shoppers have aligned their grocery purchases with companies that best represent their values,” said Sean Doyle, general manager of Seward Co-op. “While organic and fair trade are very important, P6 takes into account other values, including support for local economies and quality small-scale production. We hope the P6 designation boosts sales for these producers and businesses, while also giving our shoppers a quick way to identify products and companies we’ve vetted as ‘the best of the best.’” Read the rest of this entry »

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FREE $5. Match to First $5. EBT Dollars Spent at 3 Markets on Produce

EBT Recipients Have a New Reason to Shop at 3 Farmers Markets

By Katie Eukel

Recipients of food assistance can now use their EBT cards to purchase affordable, healthy and tasty food at the Midtown, Minneapolis, and Northeast Farmers Markets in Minneapolis. These markets will also encourage EBT users to eat well by offering an incentive—Market Bucks coupons, which will match the first $5 an EBT user spends on fresh produce at these markets with an additional $5 in Market Bucks. That amounts to $10 in produce for the first $5 spent.

“Midtown Farmers Market was the first market in the Twin Cities to accept EBT cards,” says Jessica Ward-Denison, of the Midtown Farmers Market. “The Market Bucks program has already nearly tripled the number of EBT customers at the Midtown Market, compared to last year. We’re excited to see EBT services launched at the Minneapolis and Northeast Markets this summer, and equally grateful that community partners sponsored the extra incentive so more people can come out and purchase delicious, affordable food!” Read the rest of this entry »

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State Commissioner Recklessly Alters Locally Initiated Window Safety Legislation

by Jim Graham

Three years ago Minneapolis’ own Linda Berglin and Karen Clark, with a little help from yours truly, got legislation passed to require window fall protection, such as security screens, on all new window construction for multi-unit buildings. It was limited to multi-unit buildings as a compromise, and as a beginning, but also because a huge proportion of child falls came from apartment buildings. It was anticipated even that limited law might prevent up to 80% of child falls. And that it would eventually result in even concerned parents with single family homes installing such screens. Much like the CO regulations has successfully done.

The attention and work on that legislation came about because of the sudden awareness of the problem due to Laela Shagobay falling from a window four floors up in a newly constructed building that met ALL construction codes and regulations at the time. That building and some others put on “Safety” screens as soon as they could be designed to retro-fit the windows, and before “Laela’s Law” went into effect.

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