NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Saturday March 23rd 2019

Keep citizen journalism alive!

Donatebutton_narrow

Archives

First Annual Bridging Festival crosses Phillips August 13th

By Dallas Johnson

The Bridging Minneapolis Project partnering with In the Heart of the Beast Puppet and Mask Theatre presents The Bridging Festival:  hands-on, interactive event east to  west on 24th Street- Hiawatha to 35W– site to site co-creating, learning about engagement throughout Phillips Neighborhood.

  • New to the neighborhood?
  • Want a feel for what’s going on?
  • Want to meet people doing fun, progressive work?
  • Miss the sense of community from the past?
  • Kid (or kid-at-heart) liking paint and glue on your hands?
  • Grown cynical?
  • Want to be part of a spiritual ceremony of healing and connection?

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

July 2011 Programs at the Franklin Library

By Erin Thomasson

Children’s Programs

Ross Sutter: Songs, Games and Instruments. Wed. July 6, 10:30 a.m. Entering kindergarten and up. Clap your hands, stomp your feet, and get moving to the beat as Sutter sings folk songs. Children will have a chance to try out different rhythm instruments.1

Puzzlemania!
Thurs. through Aug. 25, 2 –3 p.m. Entering grade 2 and up. Enjoy a variety of educational and fun puzzles and games!

Family Storytime
Wed. July 13 & 20, 10:30–11 a.m. Age 2 and up. Share books, stories, rhymes, music, and movement with your children.

Dakota Wild Animals
Wed. July 27, 10:30 a.m. Entering kindergarten and up. See animals from around the world and discuss habitat, feeding and characteristics unique to each critter.2

Kids Book Club
Fri. July 29, 4–5 p.m.
Entering grades 4-6. Join other kids to talk about a great book! No pre-reading required. We will share a book and discuss. Pick up a copy of the book at the children’s information desk.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Twin Cities American Indian Arts Festival

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

SPORTSTALK interview with Lindsay Whalen of the Minnesota Lynx

By Ray Jay & Young Dex

Sportstalk is back for the upcoming Minnesota pro-sports season. Yes, my friends, the season for enjoying professional sports in Minnesota is beginning. We only average about three months each year, of pro-sports here, while the other nine are nothing but misery and suffering! We both agree that this is a sad period here in Minnesota. At least contend, is all we are asking. While we made the prediction over two years ago that the next professional sports champion Minnesota would have is not; the Favre lead Minnesota Vikings; nor would it be the unled Timberwolves; or the, what are they called? Oh yes, not the Wild, or the new stadium Twins. Speaking of which, we sadly have been told while preparing this edition of Sportstalk, that Minnesota Twins great, Harmon Killibrew, has died from esophagus cancer. Killibrew put the Twins on the map. We also report the untimely death of ex-Wild star, Derek Boogaard. After spending the last hockey season with The New York Rangers, Boogaard was found dead in his Minneapolis apartment by family members. While the cause of death is currently not being reported. He passed at the age of 28.

Back to our prediction two years ago, when we here at Sportstalk said, “The next professional sports champion for Minnesota would and will be The Minnesota Lynx WNBA team. We could tell back then the Lynx franchise was being prepped. Why is that so? They were doing the things that make a champion. There were no franchise over halls, in that they started and stayed with a nucleus of talent. They then have allowed that talent to develop as a unit, never losing faith, even while losing their key nucleus player,  6-foot guard, Seimone Augustus to injury.  With the number one pick this offseason, the Lynx chose, 6-foot, guard extraordinaire, Maya Moore, who is very able to do some startlingly good things with the basketball.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Searching – A Serial Novelle Chapter 27: “Komma”

By Patrick Cabello Hansel

While Angel was having the ride of his life, Luz was trying to get back from the deep darkness that had crept—no, roared back—into hers. She had never forgotten the pain and humiliation of her adolescence, in fact on some days she could almost taste what the boys had done to her and said to her, and what the girls whispered around her. But she had tried to stuff it down so far into herself that she felt her body always heavy and tired. And now, one of those who had hurt her had come back. He wore a new scar on his face, courtesy of the man she loved.

“I’m glad Angel cut him,” she said out loud, “I wish he would have killed him!” And immediately begin to sob.

Luz had been taught the way of forgiveness. Not just by words at her church, but by the loving actions of her uncle and aunt who had raised her. After her assault, when she had become by turns withdrawn and openly hostile, they had hung in there with her. Even when she ran away, when she came home drunk, when she cursed at them, they still loved her. There were consequences, but there was always more than enough love. When she began to cut herself, they got her help. They never gave up even when she did. She had survived because of that, she had grown. Deep in herself, she felt she should forgive. Deeper still, she didn’t think she could.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

“Hats Off” as Honors are Given

May 19, 2011, marked the perfect ending to a perfect week for Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery—the kind of week that comes around once every 83 years. It was a week in which we celebrated the history of Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial (formerly Layman’s) Cemetery while making a little history of our own. May is National Preservation Month, a time when preservationists and their supporters call attention to efforts to save the nation’s historic treasures. One of those national treasures is right here in Phillips Community

Grand Opening of the Restored Main Gate “Hinges” on contributions

On Tuesday, May 17th, about 60 people attended the unveiling of Phase I of the restoration of the cemetery’s gates and the 13 sections of the fence that were in the worst condition. The weather was glorious, the tulips were in full bloom, and even the dandelions looked festive. A lime-green dune buggy buzzed around one of the vacant lots across from the Lake Street gates where guests gathered to listen to speakers. A gentleman walking down Lake Street removed his hat and held it over his heart as he passed by the cemetery gates. Council Member Gary Schiff made the opening remarks. He was followed by Winnie Layman Fernstrom, great-great-granddaughter of the cemetery’s original owners; Britta Bloomberg from the State Historic Preservation Office; Chad Larsen, Chair of the Heritage Preservation Commission; Joyce Wisdom, Executive Director of the Lake Street Business Council; and me, as Chair of Friends of the Cemetery. The message was clear: this project wouldn’t have been possible without the hard work and generous support of many individuals and agencies. The State Historic Preservation Office and the City of Minneapolis have provided the lion’s share of funding, but the value of contributions from those who have adopted pickets can not be overstated. Funders want to know, and rightly so, that the projects that they fund have broad public support; they want to know that a project matters.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Food Obsession: YOU’RE HAVING WHAT FOR LUNCH?

by Jane Thomson

Beside startling names, what these two recipes have in common is that they can help use up odds and ends of uninteresting foods, and do it simply.

EGGS IN PURGATORY – Adapted from “Dash”, the food advertising glossy supplement found monthly in the Pioneer Press and S’Trib.

For four eggs:
1 to 2 cups of marinara sauce (or ketchup, or chili sauce , or cocktail sauce, or steak sauce, or any savory red condiment; or even spaghetti sauce)
½ teaspoon red pepper flakes 4 eggs or 1 cup egg substitute
1 to 2 cups of Parmesan cheese black pepper

Simmer sauce with red pepper flakes in skillet. Crack eggs, or pour egg substitute into sauce. Cook until set as desired. Top with Parmesan and black pepper.

Am I alone in thinking that some of the prettiest strawberries often taste “blah”?

SAUTEED STRAWBERRIES WITH CINNAMON AND FRESH LIME – From the Pioneer Press

2 tablespoons of brown sugar
1 tablespoon of butter (I used less)
1 tablespoon lime juice (bottled is fine; I used more to make up for butter)
¼ teaspoon cinnamon
1 pint of strawberries, washed, hulled and halved or quartered depending on size (about 2 cups)

In medium skillet over medium-low heat, stir together brown sugar, butter, lime juice and cinnamon. Cook until bubbling. Add berries. Toss for 2 minutes. Remove from heat.

The recipe says to serve immediately; but I found the sauce kept for several days in the fridge. It is would be good on ice cream, yoghurt, pancakes, waffles, hot cereal, etc.

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

50’s emigrants found romance, jobs, home, and business ownership Right on Lake Street

Video of Chris Oien’s interview with Carol Blair is online at http://youtu.be/La5zNYQz84g

By Carol Blair as told to Chris Oien

Carol and her husband were involved with Soderberg’s Floral at 3305 E. Lake St. for almost 50 years, and owned it for 30 of them. She remembers how they got started there and what it was like. To see the full interview, go to www.youtube.com/visitlakestreet

My name is Carol Blair, my husband is Lyle Eugene Blair, sometimes call him Gene. My husband started working at Soderberg’s in 1957, and we got married in 1959. He graduated from high school in 1956 from Huntley, Minnesota. He stayed on the farm and helped his dad, and got a chauffeur’s license so he could take grain or cattle to market. He worked for one year and came up in the fall of 1957 to go to North Central Bible College. He was looking for work for about a week, and they had a bulletin board at the school where they listed job opportunities. So his roommate came in and said, could I have a ride to Soderberg’s Floral, they’re looking for a driver. Both of them ended up going in and talking to the Soderbergs. After a little discussion, the Soderbergs told them, one of you guys come back, we don’t care which one. On the way back to the school, they discussed the situation that my husband had a car and his roommate didn’t, and he had a chauffeur’s license, so it fell to my husband to start working there.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

CCC: “Snack Attack” a Cuisine Commentary by Courtney Ecuadorian “Countryman’s” platter delights at Guayaquil

Guayaquil at Lake St. and Bloomington Ave.

By Courtney Algeo

Although I tend to eat a lot of Mexican and Mexican-inspired foodstuffs, I recently realized that I’ve never intentionally sought out other types of Latin American delicacies. Rather than sitting around all day trying to figure out why this is, I immediately decided to remedy this issue, and at the suggestion of a friend, dined at Guayaquil at Lake St. and Bloomington Ave.

A simple Ecuadorian restaurant of modest decoration and awesome (I suspect) weekend karaoke offerings after 9 p.m., Guayaquil is almost hidden by all of the hubbub and bright colored buildings in the Phillips area of Lake Street. Despite its ability to blend in, I wouldn’t recommend overlooking this lovely gastronomical gem.

Having never sat down to an Ecuadorian feast, I wasn’t sure what to order. Sure, Guayaquil had plenty of safe, same-old offerings like fried rice and fajitas, but I wanted something adventurous – though not so adventurous as the items which included tripe. I wanted something new, that would knock my socks off and burn the name Guayaquil, and a map of South America, onto my belly. Under the menu heading “Especialidades de la Casa” one item caused for me the room to grow quiet, and my vision to tunnel: Bandeja Paisa. A dish that hails typically from Columbia, Bandeja Paisa is described in the Guayaquil menu as a “countryman’s platter of fried pork, fried egg, fried sweet plantain, an arepa (corn cake) and avocado with beans and rice.” Though not a countryman, I am pretty much always interested in fried pork and avocados.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

“The Alley” Goes to Harvard Law School, Cambridge & Old South Hall, Boston “Spirit of Phillips” to be experienced by its Cartoonist and Editor from Phillips

By Harvey Winje, Editor, The Alley Newspaper

Fifty-nine years ago, as a young boy growing up in Phillips, my parents enrolled me at  Wendell Phillips Junior High School on 13th Avenue and East 24th Street where housing stands now north of the Phillips Community Center Pool and Gym.  To the best of my recollection, no one ever told us who Wendell Phillips was or why the school was named from him when it was built in 1926.  The only reference to Wendell Phillips that I can remember is that a picture of him hung in the front lobby of the school.

Forty years ago, I spotted a book titled Prophet of Liberty: the Life and Times of Wendell Phillips by Oscar Sherwin in a used book store where a dollar and a half bought me the explanation not given at our junior high school.  The life of Wendell Phillips opened a whole new endeavor of study for me of mid-19th century history.  By learning about the namesake of our community, I was also able to link our community’s current struggles for human rights and social justice with people like Wendell Phillips who were willing to speak up and passionately debate and agitate for the rights of women, immigrants, slaves, and all other disenfranchised in the 1800’s.  Learning about the life of Wendell Phillips has not only inspired me but has helped to ground me in my own pursuit of social justice for the Phillips Community in my work with The Alley Newspaper.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
 Page 165 of 196  « First  ... « 163  164  165  166  167 » ...  Last »