NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Sunday January 20th 2019

Keep citizen journalism alive!

Donatebutton_narrow

Archives

Searching – A Serial Novelle Chapter 20: “JUST LET THE WORDS OUT”

By Patrick Cabello Hansel

Angel woke up in his parents’ house—a house he had not slept in for seven months—to the smell of coffee and pancakes.  Although he had slept just a couple of hours, his head was as clear as it had ever been, and his body felt strong.

Maybe it was the pancakes, frying on the stove.  Pancakes make any day a good day. Pancakes twice in one day make it a great day.  But pancakes twice before eight am in the morning had the possibility to make it a stupendous day.  Angel could still taste the post-midnight pancakes from Denny’s, he could still taste his tears, the look on Luz’ face when he put her down in front of others, his shame, the cold night, the long talk with his father.

Luz was sitting at the kitchen table with Angel’s dad, Augusto.  His mom, Carmen, stood at the stove turning the last of the pancakes.

“Are you hungry, mi ’jito?” she asked.

“In more ways than one”, he said.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

157th Cemetery Season Ends as Picket Restoration Begins

By Sue Hunter Weir

Another cemetery season (the 157th) has drawn to a close:  the Cemetery officially closed for the year on Friday, October 15th.  You will still see plenty of signs of life during the next few months, though.

On September 20th, restoration work began on the Cemetery’s fence and gates.  The thirteen sections of the fence that are in the worst shape have been removed and have been temporarily replaced by 8-foot chain link. The gates, which weigh roughly 300 pounds apiece, have been removed.  The restoration process involves many steps:  sandblasting, filling, galvanizing, and painting before they will be reinstalled in late November or early December.  Most of the kickbacks (the braces that support each fence section by extending at an angle into the ground and anchored in concrete) are too badly damaged to be restored and will be replaced.  The stone where the gates and picket sections attach to the masonry columns will need to be repaired by some replacement and tuck-pointing.  All in all, it is a very big job, but one that seems to be going quite smoothly.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

November Programs at the Franklin Library

By Erin Thomasson

Children’s Programs

Waxbarasho iyo Ciyaar Caruureed Af-Soomaali ah/Somali Play and Learn
Fri. Nov. 5 & 19, 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
P
reschool-grade 2. Dhammaan caruurta ka yar da’ dugsi. Ka soo qaybgal sheekooyin caruur, heeso iyo hawlo waxbarasho. Join us for stories, songs and activities!

Thanks for Thanksgiving
Friday, Nov. 12, 4–5 p.m.
Grade 2 and up. Share stories and activities in celebration of this fun holiday.

Sheeko Caruur Af-Soomaali ah/World Language Storytime: Somali
Tues. thru Nov. 30, 6–7 p.m.
Registration required. Register online or call 952.847.2925.
Is-qoristu waa shardi. La wadaag bugagga, sheekoyinka, jaan-gooyada maansada iyo muusikada Soomaalida. Fund. Age 2 and up. Experience the world in other languages.
Preschool Storytime

Wed thru Nov. 17, 10:30–11 a.m. For children ages 4 to 6. Help your preschooler get ready to read. Enjoy stories together and build language skills.

Kids Book Club
Fri. Nov. 19, 4–5 p.m.
G
rades 4-6. Join other kids to talk about a great book! No pre-reading required. We will share a story and discuss.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

EARTH’S AXIS ALIGNED @ 3:09AM utc* 9/23/2010 AWESOME AUTUMN ACTIVITIES BEGIN Franklin to & Lake St.

By Harvey Winje

At 3:09 AM September 23, 2010, the Earth’s axis tilted so that it was not away from or towards the Sun. The Earth’s Equator came in alignment with the center of the Sun. On that date, day and night were of approximate equal time called the equinox. [Equinox, derived from Latin aequus (equal) and nox (night)]. Anticipating longer nights, people have begun planning and filling calendars with gatherings and events to garner enough celebration and camaraderie for sustenance during the winter months–like squirrels gathering nuts for the winter.  The Alley announces many events from which to choose in this issue.  Pick enough so you don’t lose.  There will be plenty of time to snooze. * *UTC Coordinated Universal Time used for many Internet and WWW standards, in aviation, weather forecasting, etc to avoid confusion about time zones and daylight savings; colloquially as “Zulu Time.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Searching – A Serial Novelle Chapter 19: (“I will go with you.”)

By Patrick Cabello Hansel

When Angel and Luz came back into Denny’s, Mother Light and Ana had left. Such is the wisdom of love. The cards were put away, and the plates of food on the table were in their original uneaten state, growing cold. Angel stood before the remnant of that strange Guadalupe night and said, “I’m sorry. I kind of destroyed the mood.” He and Luz sat down, next to each other, almost holding hands, almost leaning into each other.

If you had magical powers of listening to thoughts, here’s what you would have heard inside each of our players:

Angel: “I know there is something in me that is broken. I need to keep searching—for it, and for whatever is out there that is meant for me. I can’t do it alone. But I’m afraid to ask.”

Luz: “I love this man so, but I don’t really know him. I’m not afraid of being hurt. I’m afraid that I will hold back, give just a piece of my heart, pretend I don’t care.”

Augusto, Angel’s dad: “My son carries the weight of our heart scarred people. I never took the time to get to know him. I hope my words touch, but not tear.”

Dolores, Luz’ grandmother: “I didn’t know Denny’s had blueberry pancakes!”

Mr. Bussey, the social studies teacher on sabbatical: “It’s way past my bedtime.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

P.T. Barnum Circus’ elephants, tigers, tents, and Tom Thumb, amidst urban, pioneer, frugal splendor “paints” image of the Layman Family and their Cedar Avenue homestead

The exquisite, yet frugal, homestead of Martin and Elizabeth Layman’s home on Cedar Avenue including sideyard and barn that hosted P.T. Barnum Circus tents, animals, and Tom Thumb on visits to Mpls.

by Sue Hunter Weir

When Martin and Elizabeth Layman arrived in Minnesota in 1852-53, they set up housekeeping in a log cabin. It was a tight fit. They had ten children at the time and three more after they arrived. In 1857, Martin Layman built what is believed to be the sixth permanent house in what later became Minneapolis.

There is no question that the Laymans worked hard, and they certainly prospered. In addition to owning the cemetery, they had a large farm where they grew fruit and vegetables. They sold their surplus food as well as wheat and oats that they grew. They sold the hay that they mowed and gathered in the cemetery. The sons hired out to work on other farms during the harvest season. They raised their own farm animals and sheared sheep for their neighbors. If there was work to be done, the Laymans could be counted on to do it.

In 1876, the Martin and Elizabeth Layman built their dream house directly across the street from the cemetery’s gates near what is now the intersection of Cedar Avenue and Lake Street. And, what a house it was. Their four-story house had marble fireplaces in every bedroom. It had indoor plumbing, a real luxury at the time. The hand-carved stair railing in the front hall reportedly cost $500.00. Peter Clausen, a well-known local fresco artist, painted the figures of four women on the ceiling of the reception hall; each figure represented a different season of the year. A chandelier that had five kerosene lanterns lighted the hall.

The house’s exterior was graced with a cupola, a wrought-iron enclosed widow’s walk, and numerous gabled windows. Yet, there is evidence of the Layman’s thriftiness, as well. The fence in the foreground of the photo has advertising for Edwards’ Monitor Liniment painted on it. Whether the Laymans used salvaged wood for their fence or charged a fee to have the ad placed there is not known. They had a windmill to pump water out of the ground for use in the house and the barn.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Food Obsession: AS THE PUMPKIN TURNS

by Jane Thomson

As I remember the story, if Cinderella doesn’t leave the ball and get into her elegant coach by midnight it turns into a pumpkin. In these recipes, the pumpkin, perhaps your jack-o’-lantern, turns into food. Both recipes are originally from the S’Trib.)

The first recipe could be a second use of your Halloween pumpkin, if it is clean, still fresh, cleaned of candle wax, and does not have very large openings cut for facial features.

BAKED BEEF STUFFED PUMPKIN

One 5 to 6 lb. pumpkin or three 2-3 lb. pumpkins 2tsp. dried sage

2 tsp. salt, divided

1 ½ tsp. dried thyme

2 tbsp. vegetable oil

½ tsp. pepper (I used more)

2 cloves garlic, minced

2 c. cooked rice

1 onion, chopped

2/3 cup of raisins

1 lb. ground beef

½ cup of pine nuts

3 eggs

Preheat oven to 350. Cut the top off pumpkin and remove seeds and strings. Prick cavity with a fork and sprinkle with 1 tsp. of the salt. Heat a large pot or skillet.

Add oil. When hot, add garlic and onion and sauté until onion is translucent.

Add beef and continue sautéing until browned. Remove from heat and add remaining ingredients.

Stuff pumpkin with mixture. Place one inch of water in the bottom of a shallow baking pan large enough to hold the pumpkin. Put pumpkin in pan and bake for 1 to 1 ½ hours. Drain. Cut into wedges. Makes about 8 servings. If there are any leftovers, reheat them but do not try to freeze them – the pumpkin gets watery.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

“Lutecorn,” “lutecream,” and “lutefish”… The Myth of the Lye-processed Cod fish is exposed bathed in butter

by Carsten Smith

It is Lutefisk Tasting Day at Ingebretsen’s Scandinavian Gifts. Customers who come in for Swedish meatballs and bakery products cautiously accept a sample from Diane Noble, an Ingebretsen’s employee in a traditional Swedish costume. They take a sample in a small paper cup and stab the white fish in butter with a toothpick. Gingerly nibbling, they gradually realize that they are not dealing with a biohazard or toxic substance. “That’s not bad. What is all the fuss about?” is the usual response. Some customers decide to buy some lutefisk and take it home. Others are content to know what the food that is often the butt of jokes really tastes like.

Lutefisk means “fish in lye” and for generations of families in the Scandinavia, it was a steady supply of protein during the long winter months. In the United States, it is a Christmas tradition for many Scandinavian-Americans. But since the lutefisk tasting at Ingebretsen’s didn’t result in people running screaming from the store, why all the jokes and reputation so bad that Andrew Zimmern filmed an episode of Bizarre Foods at the store?

“To be fair, the way lutefisk was processed years ago smelled pretty bad,” says Chris Dorff, president of Olsen Foods in north Minneapolis. Olsen Foods is the largest lutefisk processor in North America, making and selling 500,000 pounds a year. A large portion of that goes to Ingebretsen’s. The traditional method was to catch cod in nets from February to April. The fish were then skinned, deboned, and hung outside on racks to dry. The combination of cold air and bright sun were just right for quickly drying fillets and preserving them to a board-like consistency. People were then able to safely keep the fish for months and insure a steady supply of protein for their families. When a cook was ready to use the fish, it had to be reconstituted. Because soaking in water alone wouldn’t soften the fish, lye was added to the process.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Animal Kingdom & Centurion

Animal Kingdon

by Howard McQuitter

Crime Drama

Sony Picture Classics

Running Time: 113 Minutes

Rated: R

Writer/Director David Michod

Jacki Weaver as (“Mommy”) Jannie Cody matriarch of the Codys, a low-level crime family of sons, gives an excellent performance, Ben Mendelsohn as Andrew ‘Pope’ Cody, one of her most devious sons—a psychopath—the lean crook went into hiding from the cops. Craig (Sullivan Stapleton) and Darren (Luke Ford) are the other two brothers. The Codys live in one of the working class suburbs of Melbourne, Australia.

Center Stage is Joshua (or “J”) Cody, Janny Cody’s grandson, who lost his “mum” to a heroine overdose, staying with his conniving grandma and drug dealing and bank robbing uncles. Joshua is seventeen years old and not involved in their crime sprees but is sucked into it by default.

Smurf, nickname for Jannie Cody, overprotects “J” trying to shield him from her unscrupulous sons. Though “J” manages to not join the cabal he’s dragged in when the good cops bring him into custody and questioned on several occasions by police detective Leckie (Guy Pearce) hoping he’s the Key to the Codys’ nasty crime wave. Well, Joshua’s stoic demeanor precludes little if any valuable information. Nonetheless Uncles Craig and Darren became paranoid Joshua (James Frecheville) may spill the beans on their operation. Two cops have been shot and killed by part of the Cody clan.

Between a smiling, wide-eyed Machiavellian grandma named Smurf and a stoic grandson Joshua (and the relentless uncles) makes for a slow pace, brilliant crime thriller—Aussie style.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

A New “Ringmaster” at In the Heart of the Beast Theatre

by Harvey Winje

In the Heart of the Beast Theatre searched far and wide for an Executive Director to assume the role long and capably performed by Kathee Foran who retired last month.  The Board of Directors chose Loren Niemi.  Loren has a wide-ranging background that includes decades of involvement in local theater and literary circles.   Loren Niemi was the Tour manager and Ringmaster of HOTB’s “Circle of Water Circus” in the summer 1983.  It was an extravaganza that combined HOTB’s three venues—education, production, and events—in a tour from the Itasca headwaters of the Mississippi River to many towns along the River, culminating in a pageant near the Gulf of Mexico.

Chances are best that Executive Director Loren Niemi and longtime Artistic Director Sandy Spieler will combine to be a dynamic duo of “ringmasters.”   They both have the ability to be in the spotlight just long enough to focus the attention of the “roar of the crowd” on the most important performers of HOTB—students in classrooms, actors on stage, or the audience as “actors” on community streets.

Loren’s unbridled enthusiasm tempered by professorial, stage, organizing, and administrative experience addresses the three venues of the theatre company. He states, “I  will use my strong belief in HOTB’s transformative abilities to guide its resources,  build for the future, and advise on physical space needs as HOTB heads toward its 40th Anniversary in 2014.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
 Page 172 of 191  « First  ... « 170  171  172  173  174 » ...  Last »