NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Tuesday May 21st 2019

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April 2011 Daves’ Dumpster

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Beyond Wisconsin

by Peter Molenaar

March 13, 2011…

There were pleasant greetings between the handful of neighborhood folk who attended the most recent rally in Hudson. David Bicking was there. His handmade sign read: “Labor Creates All Wealth”. In jest, I pondered out loud, “Oh, I thought ownership of the means of production created wealth.” And then, yet another great semi-truck roared beneath our occupied overpass. Honk. Honk. Honnkkk…

Are public workers being unjustly scape-goated?

Well, for starters, millions of good paying American jobs have been shipped overseas. And then came huge tax breaks for super-wealthy people in a time of war. To which we must add some wildly irresponsible Wall Street speculations and sub-prime mortgage schemes which culminated in a $700 billion bailout. You be the judge.

My own handmade sign read simply: “Tax the rich”. Some long ago training as a draftsman found a nice expression. Requests for photo poses were many. Smile.

In today’s world, just 400 Americans have more wealth than half of all Americans combined—more loot than the combined assets of 155 million people. Or, to slice it in a different way, 20% of America owns 85% of the country’s wealth. Clearly, public workers are in the category of “the people”—the 80% which owns a mere 15% . Therefore, the attacks against these workers are an absolute disgrace.

Note: Wisconsin teachers average about $46,000 a year—top hedge fun managers “earn” $48,000 per hour.

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Fire Destroyed Bloomington Lake Clinic except for records

The Bloomington Lake Clinic (BLC) on Bloomington Avenue near Lake Street was destroyed by a fire on Wednesday, March 9. It is an 80-year-old medical clinic serving more than 50,000 patients in greater Minneapolis, The clinic’s second site is still in full operation at 79th Street and Xerxes Avenue in Bloomington, Minnesota and has taken on all of the staff from their Bloomington Avenue. Here is the Bloomington Lake Clinic’s update.

BLC ROAD TO RECOVERY – UPDATE 1

  • All physicians and staff from the Lake Street clinic have relocated to and are serving patients from the Xerxes Ave. location.
  • All critical clinical and business systems continue to be operational due to medical records and business systems being hosted off-site. Loss to medical and other records was minimized.
  • Phone services for physicians and staff from the Lake Street clinic have resumed — all phone numbers are operational and voicemail is expected to be restored soon.
  • Email service was hosted off-site and was unaffected by the fire; however, computers and laptops were lost. Laptops have been restored for critical employees. All other employees are able to access Web mail and computers are being replaced as quickly as possible.

“Thank you to everyone in the community who has reached out to us,” said Bob Vogel, administrator of Bloomington Lake Clinic. “We appreciate the outpouring of support during this difficult time. We are committed to providing quality care to patients in this community and are working as quickly as possible to put together a plan of action.”

“Most important, we are pleased to report that we are operational from the Xerxes Ave. clinic and our physicians are seeing all patients from this location. Patients can rest assured that we are able to provide the same level of care to them from our Xerxes Ave. location, and that they will be able to reach us,” said Vogel. “We will continue to release additional updates and communicate with patients and others with whom we do business on the progress of our recovery efforts in the form of news releases, updates on our Web site and other appropriate means.”

HOW TO CONTACT BLOOMINGTON LAKE CLINIC

All patients may contact Bloomington Lake Clinic at the Xerxes Ave. location:

Bloomington Lake Clinic
7901 Xerxes Avenue South, Suite 116
Bloomington, MN 55431

Phone: 952-888-2024

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What is TRANSITION TOWN PHILLIPS? Here, in a nutshell

By Corrine Bruning

The transition towns concept hails from England, is that peak oil and climate change are challenges that are real and will start having major effects on our oil based society. We look to become resilient and create an Energy Action Descent Plan that moves us toward a localized clean energy future. This also means learning how to grow and preserve food, utilizing all the unused land in the neighborhood to grow food, or to be a better rain catchment system. It means really advocating for transportation change and equality, by making personal choices, and persuading policymakers to make good transportation policy choices. But most importantly, it means getting to know your neighbors and establishing bonds that will help us muster together through these hardships, and not as enemies.

The beginnings of the group formed at a “Local Resilience” event held by Alliance for Sustainability on November 13. Since, then we’ve come together to discuss what we want our neighborhood to look like (bicycles, mosaics, gardens, murals, dog parks, waving and smiling neighbors), and what skills we’d be willing to share and learn. Also, as this team has grown, we’ve had discussions around energy and food, and really would like to make strong relationships with our neighbors, neighborhood groups, and businesses. Our ideas range anywhere from insulation bulk buys for the neighborhood to a street dance with local artists, musicians, and chefs. If anyone would like to find out more about Transition Towns Phillips, please visit our website at: http://transitionphillips.groupsite.com, or email: corrine.bruning@gmail.com

So, that’s Transition Town Phillips in a nutshell.

 

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“Bridging Minneapolis” Wins FEAST FUNDING

‘Bridging Minneapolis,’ the community-arts’ project on both ends of the 24th Street Pedestrian Bridge [see March The Alley, Page 1] recently won the public vote at FEAST, a city-wide arts funding competition. The $1,000 proceeds are being used to move the project forward. Watch The Alley as it unfolds! (Contact Dallas Johnson for information and to share your ideas: dallicious@gmail.com).”


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Update on the Backyard Initiative: BYI Citizen Health Action Teams Update

By Janice Barbee, Cultural Wellness Center

Every month at the Cultural Wellness Center, members from the Backyard Initiative Citizen Health Action Teams, or CHATs, come together to update each other on their activities and talk about common principles and problems in their community building work. Last month, on February 17, CHAT members discussed what it takes to work together and accomplish what they set out to do.

The Backyard Initiative was started two years ago as a community partnership between Allina Hospitals and Clinics and the residents of Phillips, Powderhorn Park, Central, and Corcoran with the goal of improving the health of the community. Most of the work of the Backyard Initiative is carried out within Citizen Health Action Teams, where community members on each team have developed a strategy for improving health and are now in the process of implementing that strategy.

CHAT Leadership in the Community

Elder Atum Azzahir from the Cultural Wellness Center, the facilitator of the meeting, explained to the CHAT members that the Commission on Health, a body of primarily community members from each CHAT, will be looking at the work of each CHAT this year in terms of how the work contributes to the health of the whole community and involves people from the community. She told the members, “The Commission is going to be asking ‘Is the CHAT growing in its connection to other people?’ How are you adding to your list of people in the Backyard? Are they connecting to what you are doing, becoming part of what you’re doing?

She then asked the CHAT members to think about their leadership skills and what skills they need to develop to be effective leaders. The CHAT members identified building relationships, identifying resources, strategic planning, and influencing, directing, and organizing people as the set of skills that are needed to do the work. Elder Atum told the group that last year the CHAT members were more focused on envisioning their projects and planning; now new skills are needed for implementing them. Some CHATs may not be able to last throughout the year if they don’t develop these skills. Elder Atum stated that the Cultural Wellness Center staff will teach some of these skills throughout the year. “One of the most important is the skill of self-study, of reflecting on what you are learning about yourself. If you cannot self-study and correct yourself, you’re not going to be able to get anything done.”

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Youth Gather and Grow Solutions in Phillips

By Ruby Levine

In July 2010, the unemployment rate for people ages 16-24 reached 19.1% nationally – it’s worse in low-income and minority communities. In response, young people here in the Twin Cities are working with the broader community to create solutions.

The Summer of Solutions (SoS) is a two-month summer program building capacity for projects that address social and environmental injustice in Phillips and the Twin Cities as a whole. Last summer, 25 full- and part-time SoS participants gathered in Phillips to work on energy efficiency, bike access, green manufacturing, and urban farming. The initial influx of capacity provided by SoS has led to sustained work throughout the year in the Phillips community and all around the Twin Cities and the program is gearing up for another jolt of energy this summer.

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Public comments NEEDED on the Certificate of Need Xcel Energy Public Hearings Wed. March 16

Plaza Verde, 1516 E. Lake St., 3rd floor ballroom

Afternoon session 2 p.m. – Evening session 6 p.m.

This is the time to bring up ideas on alternative energy sources

MN Office of Energy Security (OES) will conduct a public information meeting Wed., March 16, on the Certificate of Need application submitted by Northern States Power Company (Xcel Energy)… for the proposed 115kV high voltage transmission lines in the Midtown area of south Minneapolis.

The purpose of the meeting is to provide information to the public about the project and to identify issues and alternatives to study in an ER that will be prepared by OES Energy Facility Permitting (EEP) staff.

During the meetings, OES EEP staff will give a presentation about the state’s high voltage transmission line permitting process, certificate of need process, the proposed project, and how the public can participate. … Members of the public will have an opportunity to ask questions, present comments, and propose issues, impacts and alternatives to be studied in the ER.

Bring all your friends even if not everyone plans to speak. It is important that the room be packed with an overflow crowd. If you testify, introduce yourself, give a short one or two sentence testimony on how mitigation, conservation and.or sustainable locally-produced electricity will help you, our neighborhoods and the small and large businesses located here. Suggest methods Xcel can use instead of the high transmission lines. You don’t have to have all the answers – it is Xcel’s job to look into all the suggestions offered!

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“Programs might die, but good ideas and community… live” Phillips’ “Wellness Corridor”

by Robert Albee

For the past two years many of us in the Phillips Community have been working to resurrect the Phillips Community Center (PCC) and turn it into a centerpiece for rebuilding the fabric of the neighborhood—this time as Phillips people instead of edifices or individual programs. We want the PCC to become Phillip’s hub of activity just like the Sabathani Community Center does for the Greater Central neighborhood.

If you look below at the map of Phillips, 24th Street is the only street in Phillips that intersects all four Phillips neighborhoods: West Phillips, Ventura Village, Midtown Phillips and East Phillips. It connects LSS’ Center For Changing Lives on the west to Little Earth of the United Tribes on the East. In between is East Phillips Park’s new building, Holy Rosary Church, AICDC’s Townhomes, Center School and Open Arms. Then there is the Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center, All Nations Church, 1ra Iglesia Apostolica De La Fe En Cristo Jesus, Habitat For Humanity homes, Indian Health Board, Phillips Community Center, the Somali Village Market, Hope Academy, Phillips Eye Institute, Our Saviour’s Church and Shelter, Southside Family Nurturing Center, Sustainable Progress through Engaging Active Citizens, and of course Lutheran Social Services. WOW!

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A highway divided, but it didn’t conquer. What is a Bridge? New community project in Phillips West

by Dallas Johnson

A bridge is more than a connection between two places.

Yes, our very own 24th St pedestrian bridge across 35W connects our neighborhood to Whittier. But did you know it’s also a testament to community activism? You are invited to help breathe new life into the incredible story of our bridge.

What’s the story?

When the imminent installation of 35W was announced in 1962, the affected community fervently protested but was summarily dismissed. According to a Minneapolis Tribune article by Ted Kolderie, “Minneapolis finds itself…facing another impossible choice between accepting a highway plan to which a substantial segment of the community objects, and delaying the program again for another study”. Despite the resistance of the (largely minority) community, the freeway project was completed in November, 1967. Residents, who’d been forced to move, experienced extreme hardship in their protracted effort to restart their lives. Those who remained not only lost their neighbors but also suffered through the deafening roar of traffic as they watched the neighborhood disintegrate over the ensuing years.

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