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Friday October 19th 2018

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Daughters of the War of 1812 , The Second War of Independence, will Honor Sergeant James Nettle

Sgt. Glover's Second Marker

By Sue Hunter Weir

The Daughters of the War of 1812 will rededicate the marker of Sergeant James Nettle Glover, one of three confirmed War of 1812 veterans buried in Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery. The other two veterans, Asa Clark Brown and Walter P. Carpenter, will be honored in 2011 and 2012 respectively. John Carpenter, Walter’s brother, may well turn out to be a War of 1812 veteran as well. If that turns out to be the case, four of the approximately 200 War of 1812 veterans known to have died in Minnesota will be buried in Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery.
All of these veterans were interesting men, perhaps none more so than James Nettle Glover. Mr. Glover was born in Fort Tobacco, Maryland, in 1793. When the War of 1812 began, Mr. Glover enlisted; he was eventually promoted to sergeant.

Following the war, Mr. Glover and all of his siblings, moved to St. Louis, Missouri. It was there that he met and married Elizabeth Dozier. One of the compensations that veterans received was 160 acres of land. Mr. Glover claimed his land and began farming. Although Missouri was admitted to the union as a slave state in 1820, Mr. Glover did not use slave laborers on his farm: all of the men who worked for him were paid for their work. In 1820, anti-slavery and pro-slavery congressmen reached an agreement under which Missouri was admitted to the union as a slave state.

A deeply religious man, Mr. Glover reached the decision that he could no longer participate in slavery in any form. In 1845, he became one of several Missouri residents who pulled up stakes and moved to Grant County, Wisconsin, an area that became known as “Abolition Hollow.” Many of those who migrated brought their former slaves with them, emancipated them and helped them establish farms in the region. The area became an important stop on the Midwest’s Underground Railroad.

In their old age, James and Elizabeth Glover, moved to Minneapolis to stay with Sophie Jodon, the eighth of their twelve children. In 1870, Elizabeth Glover went on a trip back to Missouri. While she was there visiting with friends, she died unexpectedly. Mr. Glover continued living with his daughter and her husband, George Jodon. Mr. Jodon was civil engineer whose accomplishments included constructing a crystal dome on the Palace Hotel in San Francisco. The dome was destroyed in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.

On May 31, 1873, Mr. Glover died following a stroke. He is buried next to his granddaughter, Catherine May Jodon, who died in 1885, from an abscessed liver; she was 14 years old. Mr. Glover’s son-in-law, George Jodon, who died in December 1888, from heart disease at the age of 56, is also buried in the family plot.

This year, Sergeant James Nettle Glover will be honored by the Daughters of the War of 1812, a volunteer service organization, dedicated to preserving the memory of War of 1812 veterans. Mr. Glover has two markers: one a family marker and the other a military marker that was placed on his grave in 1942. The rededication ceremony will take place at 9 a.m. on Monday, May 31st (Memorial Day). Please join us in honoring a man who followed his heart and principles.

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SEARCHING – a Serial Novelle CHAPTER 14: Darkness and Light

By Patrick Cabello Hansel
Angel and Luz went on talking for what seemed to be for hours, hours of sitting among the dusty puppets and masks, telling their stories as they had never been told. Their bodies kept inching towards each other, a trusting born not only of desire, but of a calling deep within: a calling to heal and be healed. Just as they were at the point, that fulcrum of leaning into the other, a leaning that could mean kissing each other or helping each other to their feet, there was a loud BOOM! from the street corner, and the lights in the building flared and went out. Completely. Total darkness.

“What was that?” Angel asked, his body shaking.

“I think it’s a blackout”, Luz replied.

“Now what do we do?” Angel asked.

Luz paused in her reply. She knew that a kiss was on her heart and on Angel’s, but that the time for it to be fulfilled had been changed, by the stealing of the light. A first kiss is not good in the dark. You want to see your beloved being born before your eyes, you want to cherish the sight of delight reflected back to your body, your spirit, your self.

“I think we need to go and see what happened”, she finally said.

So they groped and stumbled their way to a window. Outside the street was dark, with a few shadowy figures moving around. Some looked like cops, some like those the cops might be chasing. Across the street there were a few white people holding up signs condemning the raid, and a few Latinos. One of them carried a large statue of the Virgin of Guadalupe, another seemed to be singing.

“I had almost forgotten that today is Guadalupe’s day”, Luz said.

“It’s December 12 already?” Angel replied. He realized that the days he had spent unconscious from the beating and the days of his search had scrambled his sense of time. All he knew now was that he wanted, he needed to stick to Luz. Stick to the girl whose name meant light. He remembered the gifts Mother Light had given him in the backpack.

“Hey, I’ve got a candle and some matches here”, Angel told Luz. “It will help us get out.”
And so, by the light of one candle they found the stairway, and by the light of that same candle they found the door that lead to the alley. New snow had covered the footprints of the chased and the chasers. It was almost as if the world was new for the two

“Which way should we go?” Angel asked.

“I want to find Uncle Jaime”, Luz said, softly

“But we can’t go back to the bakery. The Migra might still be there.”

“But where should we go?” Luz asked.

“I think my teacher might be able to help us.”

“Your teacher? I didn’t know you were studying some where”, Luz said.

Angel realized that what Luz had said was true and not true. He was not enrolled in college or technical school, he was studying anything. But he was learning a lot, about himself and about the neighborhood. Finally, he spoke:

“I’m trying to learn, Luz. I’m trying to study where I came from and where I’m going.”

“And now you have me to help you.”

“Yes”, Angel said. Yes, a simple yes that was stronger than the kiss he had anticipated when they were inside. Yes, Angel thought, yes, now I have a true companion, someone to walk with, someone who would understand.

“Do you believe that owls really speak to humans?” Angel asked.

“I do. I think they speak for us as well.”

“For us? What do you mean by that?”

“Let’s go. I’ll tell you as we walk.”

Luz smiled and took Angel’s hand, and they began to walk.

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“Food Obsession”: IMBY Eating

by Jane Thomson
We all know what a “NIMBY” is: someone who says “Not In My Back Yard” about having an objectionable facility near her home.

But for some good, inexpensive and interesting eating, you might look to your back yard. If your yard is sunny, you might plant vegetables; but that is an article I will leave for a more knowledgeable person to write. You might have something yummy already on your property and not be aware of it. There are many mulberry trees in Phillips. Often the berries are left to fall on the ground and rot for most of the summer. The berries taste like (expensive) blackberries – “better”, my granddaughter says. Pick all the berries you can reach; or use a sturdy ladder; or spread an old sheet on the ground and shake the branches with a broomstick. Also, you might have some rhubarb back there somewhere. It is a perennial and comes up untended for years. Or get some at the Midtown Public Market or at the Midtown Global Market.

Here are some flexible recipes for mulberry and rhubarb treats:
Mulberry Smoothie
Mulberries, milk, ice cream or frozen yoghurt, powdered milk? (for extra nutrition)
If you have a blender, put everything in and run it briefly. If not, smash the mulberries with a fork, potato masher or mortar and pestle. Quickly mix with the other ingredients with a spoon or wire whip. This makes a good breakfast, lunch or snack.
Mulberry Tart
Mulberries, a little sugar, a can of “lite” refrigerated crescent rolls
Open the rolls into their triangle forms. Put the dough triangles into non-stick muffin tins or onto a greased cookie sheet. Put a spoonful of berries and a bit of sugar in the middle of each. Seal dough over berries, and bake using the temperature and length recommended on the can for the rolls.
“What’s the Rhubarb?” (For some obscure reason that’s what I called this dish when I came up with it about twenty or so years ago.)
About 3 c. of rhubarb chunks, one small package each of orange and of strawberry or strawberry-kiwi Jello (I used sugar-free), A small dish of Cool Whip
Cut off the rhubarb leaves – they are poisonous. Wash rhubarb well. Cut it into chunks of about one inch. Cook the rhubarb with about 1 ½ cups of water and a dash of salt until it is very soft, about 10-15 minutes. Dissolve the Jello into the rhubarb mixture. Refrigerate until mixture starts to get solid. Mix in from 2 c. of Cool Whip to the whole dish (wash and save dish for re-use later). Refrigerate until solid. If you did not use all the Cool Whip, top servings with the rest of it.

A CORRECTION: Last month I missed an ingredient in the fruit dip ( I found the recipe later under “desserts” instead of “fruits”): Beside concentrated orange juice and yoghurt, sugar-free vanilla pudding mix was involved, thus making the mixture more solid and less tart. As it was, I found it especially good on bananas; and the thinner dip and just plain concentrated o.j. made good salad dressing.
More low–cal fruit dips at another time.

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Fish Tank & Repo Man

Fish Tank

by Howard McQuitter

Fish Tank (2009)
****

Lagoon
Drama
Running time: 123 minutes
Director: Andrea Arnold
Unrated

The movie starts rather slowly, but the plot becomes more clear as the main character Mia (Katie Jarvis) waddles through meaning her life at age 15. She feels trapped by her environment in the projects in an English city. Her mother Joanne (Kiersten Wareino), is a blond busty woman who loves to party and dance.

Mia’s little sister Tyler (Rebecca Griffins) plays around the tenement though she would often prefer following Mia around. Joanne’s boyfriend Connor (Michael Fassbender of “Inglorious Basterds” and “Hunger”) seems okay, a happy-go-lucky guy with a job at a factory.

The film is seen through the eyes of Misa, a school drop out, teased by boys in the neighborhood and she’s a loner. She often uses a vacant apartment above her own to practice break-dancing while watching break-dance videos. She tries to free a horse but is physically confronted by gypsy boys. Much like Mike Leigh’s films on English working class alienation, Arnold’s “Fish Tank” depicts the alienation of Mia in particular, but the characters in general.

“Fish Tank” won the jury prize at last year’s Cannes Film Festival. Andrea Arnold (“Red Road) won an Oscar for her 2003 short “Wasp”. She picks a cockney Katie Jarvis, her debut, for “Fish Tank” a mesmerizing performance by the 18 year old.

The sexual undertones by Connor toward Mia are very, very subtle. Connor’s fetish is a case of Euphebophilia, not pedophila. “Fish Tank” can be said to be a much milder version of “Precious” with the characters being Caucasians.

Repo Man (2010)
*
Rosedale 8
Drama
Running time: 111 minutes
Director: Miguel Sapachnik
Rated: R

Oh, how wonderful it is for friends to endure to the end of the film in spite of differences along the way? What is not wonderful but very stinky is the move “Repo Man”, morbidly crass, cinematically dull, and filled with vapid dialogue.
Jake (Forest Whitaker) and Remy (Jude Law) work for a med-tech giant called “The Union” run by Frank (Liv Schreider) who provides artificial organs at the low cost with 17.9% interest. But if the customers default their payments, the grim reaper Remy or Jake come take back the organs, leaving the recipients dead. This ludicrous science fiction has the temerity to steal from far better crafts – Terry Gillian’s “Brazil” (1985) and Ridley Scott’s “Blade Runner” (1982) and some futuristic films decisively mediocre but still above the ugly duckling “Repo Men”.

The films is a waste certainly for Forest Whitaker and a downer for Jude Law who is coming off an average (if not miscast) character of Dr. John Watson in “Sherlock Holmes”. As for Liv Schreider, a script full of pidgin English is enough for an insomniac to go to sleep.

“Repo Man” is based on a science fiction novel by Eric Garcia (I haven’t read the novel) which spawns Sapachnik’s ill-conceived dystopian film that begs the question, “Why was it ever made”?

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Dave’s Dumpster May 2010

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“Thoughts From Powderhorn Lake”

by Peter Molenaar

At every mid-month, contributors to The Alley are pressed into duty (or are otherwise moved by a profound love). Consequently, this writer missed ice-out day at Powderhorn—so be it. Now, at mid-April, a nice start towards a summer tan has been achieved thanks to the early spring warm-up.

Folks who descend each year to feed ducks and geese are greeted as well by the raucous demands of visiting gulls—intelligent birds who speak directly. Having satisfied them, a small group formed next to me upon the concrete ledge which holds the shore line. I was awe-struck. Gulls are utterly handsome and exquisitely evolved birds. Sensing my new-found admiration, in unison they turned to display the V formed by their black trim tail feathers. I had been invited to join the flock.
Question: Does an early spring coupled with a cold winter mean that the global warming disbelievers club can have its cake and eat it too?

It was supposed to have been a warm El Nino winter. Right? What happened to the associated upper air current which normally then restricts the Arctic air mass to the north of us? Contrary to expectations, we endured the usual infusions of cold air which press south across mid-continent all the way to Texas. Hey, it felt like global cooling to me.

Actually, no one wants to believe in global warming. However, the El Nino effect, associated with the upwelling of warm Pacific water at the equator, has been over-ruled by a new phenomenon induced by global warming (sorry). Specifically, the body of North Pacific water found west of Alaska has begun to heat up. The resulting updraft of warm air will now constrict the annual accumulation of winter Arctic air such that it must spread out to the south across land. Hence, El Nino will be over-powered.

The kicker is this: Given the fact of global warming, our Arctic air when pressed to southern latitudes will heat more rapidly thus hastening the arrival of spring—not all immediately bad for the inhabitants of the North American continent it would seem. But don’t sing “God Bless America” too loudly, please.

We shall assume that our “disbelievers” are familiar with the projected consequences, including the economic and ecological interconnections for which there is no immunity. They simply reject the underlying premise (sorry, once again).

Will we begin a sustained attack on global warming or remain in a fossil fuel/carbon based economy (forever!)? I suggest, dear people, that the solution will require a significant fiscal expansion (not contraction and market forces) coupled with radically redefined priorities.
Meanwhile, the CEO of UnitedHealth, the Minnetonka based health insurer, received a $102 million “compensation” in 2009. Sure am glad we had people rioting in the streets on behalf of Stephen Hemsley’s freedom. Which is to say, I might yet decide to join that flock of gulls.

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Kudos: Little Earth Urban Farm

Little Earth Urban Farm

By Harvey Winje
The May 2010 KUDOS is the Little Earth of United Tribe Urban Farm Project for its ambitious conversion of vacant land into many raised beds for growing food locally.

Last year a busload of people went to Milwaukee to see Will Allen’s farm project. The group came back excited about the possibilities for growing food, developing jobs and even preserving traditional culture.

Last year 40 residents of Little Earth of United Tribes signed up as did 25 people from other organizations. This year on Earth Day the Little Earth Urban Farm project began the growing season by clearing stones and unwanted objects from the very large plot between the Hiawatha sound wall and the road east of Little Earth. People of all ages hauled wood chips, mixed in compost, and thus made rich one-foot beds of soil. They also planted lilacs along the wall and other plants and seeds in the beds.

A sign of pure enthusiasm and optimism was carried in on the shoulders of several adults; a wooden picnic table brightly painted by pre-school students and placed beneath a nearby tree ready for the first harvest picnic.

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2010 Minnesota American Indian Month Kickoff Parade and Celebration Friday, April 30th 9 AM

Minnesota American Indian month began as American Indian week in 1969 as a way to educate the broader community about American Indian people and cultures. More than 40 years later, south Minneapolis continues to be an important neighborhood in the urban American Indian community.

The 2010 Minnesota American Indian Month Kickoff celebrates the special role American Indians have played in south Minneapolis and throughout Minnesota.

Over 1,000 participants will be involved from around the metro, state, and region in the largest Indian Month celebration in the state.

The Banner Unveiling is of newly designed banners to be installed from Chicago Avenue to 16th Ave. The banners were a joint project between Native American Community Development Institute, Ventura Village, and Franklin Avenue Business Association.

9:00 AM Gather/Opening Ceremony

Cedar Field – Little Earth of United Tribes, Cedar Ave. and 25th St.

10:00 AM Parade of Nations Community Walk

Cedar Field to Minneapolis American Indian Center/Wakiagun Lawn

11:00 AM American Indian Cultural Corridor Banner Unveiling

E. Franklin Ave. and 11th St.

11:30 AM Veterans and Warriors Dedication

Minneapolis American Indian Center/Wakiagun Lawn

12:00 PM Community Photo

Minneapolis American Indian Center/Wakiagun Lawn

12:30 PM Feast/Live Music

Minneapolis American Indian Center/Wakiagun Lawn

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Phillips Unites on Pool and Gym Use & Defeat of MPRB Burying Pool under Concrete

Olympic size pool built with Model City money in 1974 that’s future is in the throes of budgetary/politico squalor. The question remains; “Will it all be money down the drain?”.

A Commentary by Robert Albee

Two words went out over the internet the evening of March 25th: “We won!” The truth of the matter is that the Phillips Community has only secured a delay in the destruction of the swimming pool at the Phillips Community Center. The April 1st “destruction day” was announced earlier in a telephone call from Minneapolis Park & Recreation Board (MPRB) Commissioner Scott Vreeland. He confirmed a March 11th email sent from Park Board staff member Andrew Lesch to a Mid Town Phillips resident and neighborhood association board member.

In that email, Lesch wrote: “I’m the project manager for the current renovations at Phillips Community Center. This phase involves replacement of the heating, cooling and ventilation system with new roof top units, roof replacement of the upper roof and in fill of the former pool shell for re-use in the future.”

Those were the words that began a cascade of emails and telephone calls to the MPRB from Phillips Community residents and others upset with that decision. Some of the emails are included in this edition of in this edition of The Alley and see others on website www.alleynews.org.

Most importantly, Phillips people came through by voicing their concerns and outrages regarding the process that led to the MPRB decision to destroy the pool. Contractors speculated as to why the MPRB would go so far to actually destroy the pool when a simple, safe covering or enclosure over the pool would temporarily suffice. Apparently they had thought they already had made a permanent decision within a building that they already own. End of discussion…for them!

MPRB Commissioner Annie Young made clear in an email to Crystal Trutnau, Executive Director of Phillips West Neighborhood Organization, that the Park Board never operated that swimming pool; it was open only during the tenancy of the Boys and Girls Club in the PCC facility. Her thinking, presumably, was with all the liability issues associated with a swimming pool, why would the Park Board want to get itself involved in a potentially litigious situation, at the very time they are facing unbelievable operating fund deficits? Thus filling in the pool and making an indoor playground for children seemed a very good alternative! Not so fast, Annie, was the response of many emailers.

Many Phillips Community supporters expressed outrage at the lack of clear communication and respect toward the neighborhoods by MPRB staff and commissioners, only to be met with a snarky response from Commissioner Young that apparently the right persons in Phillips were not consulted. And so the back and forth began, with some very harsh letters from Ventura Village’s Jim Graham and East Phillip’s Carol Pass. But this story is not about a couple of grenades tossed over MPRB’s fence. Other emails less focused on personalities or past Park Board failures, demanded a halt long enough for the Phillips Community stakeholders to weigh in on the decision. To some, that would be a delay in announced actions; for others a demand for a complete aquatic park on adjacent land as a trade for the loss of the current pool.

MPRB staff member Dick Mammen attended a March 17th event entitled “Connecting The Dots…” held at the Center For Changing Lives. That meeting was an opportunity for Phillips residents and stakeholders to voice their positive ideas about future uses of the Phillips Community Center building, including the swimming pool. In direct conversation with me, Mammen asked why we would support fixing up a pool that’s like a “47 Chevy” instead of fighting for a new one. My response was, “I’d rather have a 47 Chevy than no wheels at all!”

I hope that is the sentiment of others in Phillips even though I would agree with the basic idea of a separate facility on adjacent land that can involve what East Phillip’s resident Hannah Lieder described as a complete swimming and diving complex. As part of her organization called Minneapolis Swims, youth such as those here in Phillips should be taught basic swimming and aquatic survival and encouraged to become lifeguards and competitive athletes in a facility that would support such efforts.

Just hours before I learned that the April 1st destruction deadline had been averted, I received an email from Dr. Sally Lieberman from the University of Minnesota. She reported that the therapeutic pool at Fairview-University Hospital had just been closed and no other pools except for the overly-busy Abbott-Northwestern Wasie pool is available in Minneapolis. This forces bus riders such as Dr. Lierberman to mount an expedition to the suburbs—to Courage Center in Golden Valley or another site in Eden Prairie for her/their physical well-being. She and seventy-five others planned to write letters to the MPRB asking them to reconsider. Within an hour of my encouraging Dr. Lieberman and associates to commence writing and sending, word came from Minneapolis’ Sixth Ward Alderman Robert Lilligren that MPRB had announced a halt order on the swimming pool. We’ve won a battle, but not the war!
Here’s where that leaves us: We’d better put up or shut up! We’ve secured a delay and now we must come to a conclusion regarding what we want to have happen as a result. It is clear that the MPRB has never—nor never will—operate a swimming pool in Phillips. So let’s not waste valuable time asking or demanding that from them. It is clear to me that our Phillips Community supporters and trusted bedfellows must secure that building on a twenty year lease for $1 per year from MPRB; pay them honestly and reasonably as landlords for the daily operations and appropriate upkeep of the building. That also means that we must secure tenancy and use of the building that includes paying for the operations of that facility, based on actually billings to the MPRB.
We must never allow what happened with the Boys and Girls Club to happen again—leaving a big mess behind and MPRB accepting a $40,000 pittance or “shut-up money” as one Phillips resident put it. Jim Graham is right! Somebody owes the Phillips Community millions of dollars from that last fiasco; but it should also be clear that even if we never legally recover a nickel from that period, we must move forward and demonstrate to all that we are much better stewards of this community’s resources than some of our predecessors.

If you wish to join this community effort to transform the vacant Phillips Community Center and it’s swimming pool into a facility that works effectively for all the residents and stakeholders of Phillips, contact me at ralbee4045@aol.com. My telephone number is 612.812.2429.

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“For little fellers, not the Rockefellers…the improvement of people’s lives…the cause of peace and justice.” –Paul Wellstone

Gera Pobuda artist, teacher and organizer created this acrylic paint enhanced screen print of Senator Paul Wellstone and donated it to be hung in the Community Center of Hope Community on the NE corner of the Franklin and Portland Avenues intersection.

“I’m for the little fellers, not the Rockefellers. Politics is not about power. Politics is not about money. Politics is not about winning for the sake of winning. Politics is about the improvement of people’s lives. It’s about advancing the cause of peace and justice in our country and the world. Politics is about doing well for the people.” Paul Wellstone’s voice and life that spoke and lived those words was silenced seven and one-half years ago in a plane crash that killed him, Sheila, his wife, Marcia, his daughter, and five others.*

On Friday, March 19th, Gera Pobuda, artist, organizer, and teacher, unveiled the stunning screen-print portrait she had made of him and is donating to Hope Community. It will be hung on the wall of the Community Center in their newest building on the northeast corner of Franklin and Portland and named for Sheila and Paul Wellstone.

Fittingly, she seems to have been “commissioned” to paint this as a grassroots organizer would be so inspired to do. She found a scrap of wind-blown paper with Wellstone’s photo on it outside of the Elmer L. Andersen archives at the University of Minnesota while on her way to her screen-printing class. With the photo as a “model,” Gera etched the screen fabric in the likeness of Paul, made the print, and then enhanced the image by hand-tinting with acrylic paints.
Pobuda is a local artist, a recent graduate of the University of Minnesota, and an organizer of Bohemian Flats Day along the Mississippi River . One of her other paintings is currently on display in the “Foot in the Door” exhibit at the Minneapolis Institute of Art. Pobuda is interested in getting in touch with her Bohemian spirit and using the double meaning as a theme in her art. Many of her paintings feature the relationship between Bohemian Flats and her ancestors’ home in the Czech Republic.

The appropriateness of her choice of where this could be displayed is obvious: the Wellstone Building on a corner that just years ago did, indeed, seem hopeless to many. She had seen the new building as it was being built passing it often when biking down Franklin Avenue to her tutoring commitment at the Franklin Avenue Library. Learning it would be named “The Wellstone” confirmed for her the serendipity of it all. William Delaney, a Hope Community staff member, accepted the portrait on behalf of the organization.

It is also appropriate that Hope Community would name one of their three buildings at that intersection, “The Wellstone,” because they, too, “advance the cause of peace and justice” as they address the total wellness of that area of Phillips Community and because they, too, are there “for the little fellers.”
* Five others were also killed; three campaign workers and two pilots.

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