NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Saturday December 14th 2019

Keep citizen journalism alive!

Donatebutton_narrow

Archives

October 2011 Daves’ Dumpster

October 2011 Daves’ Dumpster

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Fishing Trip

Peter Molenaar

by Peter Molenaar

It is good for an inland worker to visit big water from time to time.  My father and I are just now returned from fishing Lake of the Woods in northernmost Minnesota.  The curvature of the horizon is discernable to the eye there.  So, thank you Smith Foundry for letting me go.

As I was not pressed to engage the machine, the promising sunrise then lingered.  The inlet bay of our camp offered a calm cold mist among the green cattails.  But the big water answered with wind and waves.

Several flotillas of cabin cruisers located the walleye far from shore.  But we with our smallish boat opted to troll the shoreline for northern pike or maybe a musky.  We had paid a high price for a day’s worth of frustration when, wop, “FISH ON!” I shouted.  It made one glorious straight up leap– “YEOW!  It’s a bass!”

Such an extraordinarily handsome specimen of a smallmouth bass it was.  I gently removed the hooks all the while apologizing and wondering if the notion of Karma were true.  But, ego prevailed.  Our bass was brought to shore to be weighed (4.3 lbs!), photographed, displayed among the humanoids, and consumed.

Yet my unsettled conscience was to receive another blow.  During the return trip, Minnesota Fishing Regulations 20l1 revealed that smallmouth bass taken after September 12 are to be catch and release only.  Had I known…

So, the question remains:  Was the chauvinism manifested towards that beautiful fish of the same magnitude as that displayed by images of “great white fathers” carved upon sacred rocks in South Dakota?

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Letter to the editor

Dear Editor,

Has the electoral process withered while our legislators balked at compromise?

The resignation of Senator Linda Berglin opens a seat to be filled by a special election.  The first campaign candidates’ forum at the Mercado Central August 26 brought up some traditional and newfound issues.  The citizens of Senate District 61

will decide by their votes which way to turn as we come to this fork in the road.

Are the Minnesota legislators to remain in their traditional role of part-time service to the common good? Or are we headed on the path toward professional career politicians using the legislative process as a staging platform by which to create their next higher opportunity?  Infotainment has become a business.”

Take a look and ask the questions.  Are media staff persons really jackals, as Governor Jesse Ventura liked to say?  “Is politics as usual ”really dead and buried?  Has governor Pawlenty’s “no new taxes” pledge been saved by the Republican mantra of “no new compromise?’”

These antics brought us to a government shut-down.  With this in mind, we must ask what are the needs of SD 61, and where is the political talent to match our issues and concerns?  We begin the first post shut-down election with one major party candidate, DFL Representative Jeff Hayden.  Where are the others?”

But this is not to be a one candidate contest.  [There are] ordinary Minnesota citizens ready and able to step up.  They and their supporters raised important questions, and they did so with honest and integrity.  They have the shellacking our politicians rightfully deserve.”

Alas, just one candidate had the technical knowledge of the electoral process to jump the DFL gate and be nominated to oppose Jeff Hayden at the DFL endorsement contest.  Does this mean the Party rules are serving us, or are they too much of a barrier?”

These and other questions, issues, and concerns brought forward by the citizens of SD61 comprise the substance of our electoral process.  Let the contest proceed!

Sincerely,

Georganne Krause

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Update on the Backyard Initiative An Integral Community Care System

By Janice Barbee, Cultural Wellness Center and Lovel Trahan, AmeriCorps VISTA, Allina Health Systems

On September 23, the Circle of Healing CHAT of the Backyard Initiative hosted a community forum entitled “An Integral Community Care System: Responding to the Health and Wellness Needs of Community” to present a framework for developing a community care system that will combine community resources and knowledge with conventional, professional resources.

The Backyard Initiative (BYI) is a partnership between Allina and community residents to improve the health of the community. Residents of Central, Corcoran, East Phillips, Midtown Phillips, Phillips West, Powderhorn Park, and Ventura Village have formed Citizen Health Action Teams (CHATs) to work together on health-improvement projects they have designed.

The Circle of Healing CHAT is working to blend traditional community knowledge of health and healing with institutional Western medicine. At the September forum, Elder Atum of the Cultural Wellness Center led the group through a facilitated discussion that explored how a community model of providing health care could achieve the lasting results necessary to improve quality of life. Some of the themes included connecting with a patient’s story, identifying community partners for implementing a holistic model of patient care, and sharing knowledge across disciplines.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

The Alley’s Roving Reporter at the August 13 Bridging Event: What are examples of “Bridging” you have experienced in Phillips?

Muriel Simmons:

“We worked on building bridges in the neighborhood; between the community and the police;  between corporations and neighborhood organizations; and between young people and older people.”

Back then, drug dealers called police on me, that’s when I knew I had their attention.  Respectful relationships were formed with the police.  Our home just about became a community center.”

Back then, we started knocking on doors – asked people, are you aware of the crime around here, do you want to join the block club?  We invited people into our home, we didn’t have much but made it clean and comfortable.  People began to trust me.  I gave myself a birthday party and invited everyone, including the police.” We created a “Seniors walk” on Friday nights.   They were scared but we wanted to take our sidewalks back.  We practiced looking people in the eyes.  It was like a bridge, people coming out of their homes into the neighborhood.  We knew we were successful when we started seeing wheelchairs and walkers out in the neighborhood.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

It’s the “The Cat’s Meow”– Jeremy Messersmith in Concert on “Graveyard Stage” at Cedar and Lake

Saturday, October 8 Gates open & smartphone history hunt 1:00 pm Lucy Michelle and the Velvet Lapelles 2:00 pm Jeremy Messersmith 4:00 pm Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery, 2925 Cedar Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55407 Tickets $10 in advance, $15 at the door; children 12 and under free (donations gladly accepted) Proceeds support restoration of the historic cemetery fence

Saturday, October 8 Gates open & smartphone history hunt 1:00 pm Lucy Michelle and the Velvet Lapelles 2:00 pm Jeremy Messersmith 4:00 pm Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery, 2925 Cedar Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55407 Tickets $10 in advance, $15 at the door; children 12 and under free (donations gladly accepted) Proceeds support restoration of the historic cemetery fence.

By Sue Hunter Weir

We are honored to have Jeremy Messersmith on the “Graveyard Stage” preceeded by Lucy Michelle and the Velvet Lapelles perform as part of a Cemetery Open House Gate Saturday, October 8th in conjunction with the Partners in Preservation Voting. Ticket sale proceeds will be used to continue our 1,853 foot fence restoration project.

Jeremy’s performance will include, without hesitation, songs from his most recent album, “The Reluctant Graveyard.” “The Reluctant Graveyard,” was named as one of the top ten albums of 2010 by National Public Radio’s “All Songs Considered” and best local album by the Star Tribune. Some of the songs on “The Reluctant Graveyard,” including “Toussaint Grey,” were inspired by inhabitants of Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery. Chris Riemenschneider, music critic for the Minneapolis Tribune, predicts that “this should be one of the most memorable concerts of the year.” To learn more about Jeremy’s music, visit: http://jeremymessersmith.com/.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Amusement, Medical Innovation, and Transit Allied for Success

After two cold and rainy summers that resulted in slow ticket sales, Wonderland closed in 1911. The only evidence on the landscape that Wonderland ever existed is the Infantorium, which is this apartment building on the southeast corner of 31st Avenue and 31st Street.

By Sue Hunter Weir

The story of the Wonderland babies is as much of a crowd pleaser today as it was when Wonderland Park was in operation between 1905 and 1912. When Wonderland opened its gates in 1905, it was not just a big news story—it was a huge story. It wasn’t just that having a modern amusement park was important to the city’s image and sense of itself as the gateway to the Northwest, it was the effect that the park had on the city’s infrastructure and economy. In 1905, for the first time, it became possible for Minneapolitans to take a streetcar from Hennepin and Lake to 31st Avenue and Lake without going through downtown. It was no coincidence that 31st and Lake marked the entrance to Wonderland Park. The following year, a newly constructed addition, the Selby-Lake streetcar line, provided easier access to the park for visitors from St. Paul. On busy days, streetcars ran as often as every thirty seconds to handle the crowds. In its first year of operation, over half-a-million people came to see the park.

The thing that made it all possible—the streetcars, the rides, and the 120-foot beacon of light that could be seen for miles—was electricity. What few people realized at the time was the electricity was also capable of saving lives.

At the far end of the park, stood the Infantorium, essentially a neo-natal intensive care hospital for premature babies. For the price of a ten-cent ticket, visitors could see the hospital’s shiny, new incubators. Incubators, at least those used for raising poultry were not unknown, but the idea of using an incubator to raise a human baby came as something of a surprise to many of the fair’s visitors. Many people were confused about how the baby incubators worked, and, drawing on their experience of watching eggs turn into chicks in “hatcheries,” thought that the babies were conceived and born in the incubators. The steel-framed boxes with their glass sides became known as “automatic mothers,” although some of the more poetically-inclined reporters described them as “glass castles.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Searching – A Serial Novelle Chapter 30: Drop The Maybe

By Patrick Cabello Hansel

Luz and Angel walked in silence to the cemetery. The clouds had disappeared, and the nearly first quarter moon hung like a bowl tipped up to pour out blessings. They stopped by the closed gates and looked at the sky together. Midnight passed, and the slow December march t the dawn began quietly.

“Do you think we’re going to die?” Angel asked Luz.

“Yes—I mean everyone has to die,” she answered.

“No—are we going to die soon?” His lip began to curve into the same shape as the moon.

“I don’t know—why?”

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

“Poets Poet” in Tribute to Roy McBride

Louis Alemayehu, reading his poem “Caught” in tribute to Roy McBride accompanied by Steven Hasse on trumpet at a Memorial Poetry Reading August 12th at In the Heart of the Beast Theatre. Scores of poems, testimonials, tributes, and songs by many artists (including Carey Thomas, pictured here) were dedicated to the life and memory of Roy McBride—a poet who exemplified that “poets poet” and was Poet Laureate of Lake Street. Right on,! Lake Street!

By Louis Alemayehu
Roy Chester McBride: Caught
Intoxicated on Lilacs
& simply simple complicated life.

You got caught, I got caught, we got caught…
in the web of life

That voice…
The rhyme and repetition,
the rhyme and repetition,
the rhyme and repetition…

I hear you now, I hear you know, in my brain
In my brain,
my brain,
my brain

I see you now
marching
in another 30 mayday parades

From Phillips to Powderhorn,
step by step
by step
by step
by step

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows: Part 2 & The Robber

Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows: Part 2

 

Harry Potter and The Deadly Hallows: Part 2-2011
**** (Four of five stars)
Warner Brothers
Rating PG-13
Running time: 131 minutes
Drama/Fantasy
Director: David Yates

Cast: Daniel Radcliff (Harry Potter), Ron Weasley (Rupert Grint), Emma Watson (Hermione Granger), Helena Bonham Carter (Bellatrix), Ralph Fiennes (Lord Voldemort), Robbie Coltrane (Rubeus Hagrid), Micheal Gambon (Professor Albus Dumbledore), John Hurt (Ollivander), Jason Issacs (Lucius Malfoy), Kelly Macdonald (Helena Ravenclaw), Gary Oldman (Sirus Black), Alan Rickman (Professor Severus Snape), Maggie Smith (Professor Minerva Mc Gonagall), David Thewlis (Remus Lupin).

For aching Harry Potter fans over the last decade, seven (“eight” films, additions (and some subtractions)of thespians, four directors arrive at the final Potter film: “Deadly Hallows Part 2”.The final battle is between the now grown, bespectacled Harry Potter, played by Daniel Radcliffe, and his nemesis Lord Voldemort, played by Ralph Fiennes. Voldemort planning to destroy Potter for good is what’s at play.

Between J.K. Rowling’s seven books and four directors Chris Columbus, Alfonso Cuaron, Mike Newell and David Yates, respectively, the Harry Potter series is a phenomenon, perhaps the world’s finest as far as transformation from novel to silver screen.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
 Page 179 of 214  « First  ... « 177  178  179  180  181 » ...  Last »