NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Friday June 5th 2020

Keep citizen journalism alive!

Donatebutton_narrow

Archives

Commentary NRP Funds…Are Mpls. City Hall Democrats still Democrats? Party of Compassion?? Do the Math!! The Rich Get Richer, The Poor Get Poorer and Neighborhoods, too

By Carol Pass

In the midst of watching the destruction of the democratic right of collective bargaining going on next door in Wisconsin, an action bought and paid for by the billionaire Koch brothers, I attended a meeting called by a group of Democratic legislators. A graph was handed out, shown here, of the seriously regressive taxation rates current in Minnesota. Fellow Democrats in the room expressed outrage at years of too much political control by wealthy Republicans and at how regressive taxation has distorted the economy of the American populace into a tiny group of haves and a major group of have nots….so much so that a current magazine with clear legitimacy ran an article entitled ‘Plutocracy Now!’ (rule by the rich), a play on the name of the TV show ‘Democracy Now’.

The graph put out by the State Department of Revenue showed those making from $9,000 to $86,000 paying an average of 12% of their income for taxes, while those earning $447,000 and above paying only 8.9%. These wealthy folks use far more of the public resources from airports to roads to electricity, etc. yet they pay a far smaller percentage of their income in taxes than the middle and lower middle classes, who carry the greatest, by percentage income, of the tax load. How fair is this?? But these figures are primarily the result of the actions of the Republican Party. We Democrats in the room expected such.

Now look at the other figure, an analysis of the reapportioning by the Minneapolis Mayor and City Council of the NRP dollars once allocated by the legislature to the Neighborhoods. By the action of the “Democrats” of Minneapolis City Hall, a huge amount of remaining NRP dollars, money that was allocated primarily to the poorest and most diverse neighborhoods of Minneapolis, is being reallocated overwhelmingly to the wealthiest and least diverse Mpls. neighborhoods in the form of tax savings. This reallocation is more economically regressive than the truly regressive taxation by Republicans shown in the graph. It sends approximately $9 dollars to the affluent neighborhoods for every $1 dollar to the least affluent.  This is a wealth transfer from poor to rich of remarkable and unjust proportions. While the percentage tax saving is the same for both groups, the point is: the money to produce this huge influx to the non-diverse and affluent southwest neighborhoods is coming overwhelmingly from the poor and diverse neighborhoods such as Hawthorn, Jordan, Lind-Bohanon, Harrison and Near North, as seen in the chart. How is it possible that the outcome of the actions of our Democrats in City Hall so resembles and even goes beyond the results of the most conservative Republican majorities we have had in decades??

One of the legislators with us at that recent meeting commented that some of these Council Members who supported this action voted against the well-being of their own constituents. Those there applauded in recognition of the truth of this remark.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Phillips Student Erika Espey-Sundt Honored for Songwriting

by Kevyn Burger

Erika Espey-Sundt, a senior studying music at the Perpich Center for Arts Education, is winner of Zeitgeist’s 16th annual Eric Stokes Song Contest in the youth category. Her piece, “Gust of Wind,” reflects the different stages of an adventure, from whimsy and playfulness to mystery and intensity.

The daughter of Kristen Sundt Espey-Sundt began composing just three months ago, under the direction of local composer and Arts High School music teacher Janika Vandervelde. Erika studies viola, violin and also enjoys singing.

“Composing this song started as a class assignment, but I spent a lot of time out of class working on it as well,” Erika said. “I can’t wait to see how they will arrange it and hear it performed. This is amazing.”

The Eric Stokes Song Contest is sponsored by new music group Zeitgeist in memory of late composer Eric Stokes; designed to encourage and celebrate amateur composers throughout the Twin Cities.

The winning composers have the opportunity to participate in Zeitgeist’s annual Playing it Close to Home concerts in February; in addition, she also receives a $100 prize and a one-year membership to the American Composers Forum.

“This was the strongest group of youth composers we’ve seen in the 16 years we’ve held this contest. Our judges were uniformly impressed with Erika’s mature and inventive composition, and we can’t wait to play it during our upcoming Playing it Close to Home concerts,” said Heather Barringer, artistic co-director and percussionist for Zeitgeist.

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Noche de Paz Night of Peace Celebrating community! Hosted by Latina leaders and friends

By Kathleen Sullivan and Mary Laurel True, Powderhorn neighbors

What brought neighbors to come together in warmth and light on a cold February evening?

Inspired by the Peace in Powderhorn event on December 1, Powderhorn neighbors kept the bonfires burning, and came together to enjoy a Noche de Paz or Night of Peace. It was an evening of fire and ice-lanterns, love of community, and warmth of togetherness on February 13, 2011 in Powderhorn Park.

The idea was spearheaded by a group of women who shared a vision. This vision was to extend the community spirit that came out of the December gathering, in pro-active ways that would continue throughout the year, with a goal of further developing a peaceful and united community. The fruit of their effort became Noche de Paz.

Bonfires, melty ice lanterns, and a painting of a peace dove transformed the outdoor space, while twinkling lights and homemade peace signs adorned the cozy space indoors. Park staff generously opened their doors to the community on their day off. Participants were treated to music by young D.J. Andres, drummer Tomas, and West African drummers Onayemi and friends. An appreciative audience huddled around the bonfires for warmth, and the wind seemed part of the show, as puppeteers Laura and John brought their story of the “Wintermaker” to life.

Everyone enjoyed delicious homemade soups from Sara and Senora Maria at La Poblanita. “It’s like the loaves and fishes!” Mary Laurel said of the bottomless soup pot from La Poblanita. Speaking of loaves, the New French Bakery shared an abundance of bread, while New York Plaza Produce donated cookies. Aliina, Nicolas, and Eat 4 Equity provided silverware and Powderhorn Park provided dishes for a zero-waste event. Several volunteers graciously worked behind the scenes to keep a steady supply of clean dishes.

People who never thought of themselves as learders came forward and were suddenly holding a microphone, or were being interviewed on Univision, the local Spanish TV station! (See Youtube for the video from Univision as well as one from the Minneapolis Mirror.) The entire event was in held in Spanish and in English. Josefina and Doug invited everyone to take part in the neighborhood Safety Committee, Dara invited involvement in Powderhorn Park Neighborhood Association. Young Netem and younger Emmet spoke about what they love about Powderhorn.

Hosted by Mujeres en Accion y Poder (Women in Action and Power) at Corcoran Neighborhood Association, several women came together to plan this event: Silvia, Fabiola, Teresa, Josefina, Francesca, Lina, Khusaba, Fernanda, Jessica, Amada, Vienna, Kathleen, and Mary Laurel. New leaders came forward, and many neighbors became involved, forming connections with each other and furthering the goal to increase unity and peace in our community.

To all in the Powderhorn area who love their neighborhood, we invite you to a proposed Peacemakers Gathering to discuss future events and plans. To participate, contact Silvia at Mujeres en accion y poder 612-724-7457 spthalia1103@gmail.com or Lina at Powderhorn Park Neighborhood Association, 612-722-4817 lina@ppna.com.

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Phillips and The Alley Go to Harvard

By Susan Gust, Amy AusiÉirithe

The Alley Newspaper and its editor, Harvey Winje, have been invited to be a part of The Wendell Phillips Bicentennial Symposium at the Harvard Law School Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice, June 2 – 4. This exciting invitation was extended to The Alley because the Symposium’s scholarly planning committee was enthused to discover a vibrant community with Wendell Phillips as its namesake. They were even more pleased to learn that the Phillips Community has embraced Wendell’s spirit of discord and discourse as its means to seek justice in the same way that Mr. Phillips did some 200 years ago. Harvey Winje and The Alley Newspaper were invited to attend this symposium and present how the life and legacy of Wendell Phillips inspires our work individually and in the community. Dave Moore and Linnea Hadaway’s poignant Spirit of Phillips cartoons will be also be featured at this symposium as a provocative way to popularize history and to exemplify issues that span generations.

Harvey Winje and Dave Moore are honored to travel to Boston in June to attend this symposium and to represent the work of so many in the Phillips Community and in the pages of The Alley Newspaper. Cartoons that have appeared in the pages of The Alley Newspaper will appear as part of the power point presentation given by Wendell Phillips scholar and Macalester College professor, James Stewart, as part of his keynote address at the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice, Harvard Law School. Additional cartoons and graphics depicting Wendell’s words and their relevance in our community will be on display at the symposium.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

April Artisans Bring MAY DAY Pageant

By Harvey Winje, In the Heart of the Beast

The Annual May Day Parade and Festival is a harbinger and highlight of Spring exceeded only by the gatherings of all ages during April that produce this special pageant. You’ve heard “April showers bring May flowers.” Well, April artisans will bring another May Day pageant. It is truly a “Miracle at The Avalon,” In the Heart of the Beast’s Theatre at 1500 East Lake Street, where it is the first year for some people and for others, their 37th year. Folks of all ages will mold clay into shapes that layers of paper mache will change into life-like masks . It is truly a miracle of community building that uses imagination and transforms dumpster finds into magic dances of life. It is making the common things of life sacred. Join in one of the following times:

37th Annual MayDay Parade Workshops Begin April 2
Public MayDay Workshops
1500 Lake St E, Minneapolis
April 2 – 28
Saturdays: 9:00 am – 11:00 am and 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Tuesdays: 7:00 – 9:00 pm
Thursdays: 7:00 – 9:00 pm
MayDay Parade and Festival
Sunday, May 1
1:00 pm: Parade begins at intersection of Bloomington Ave. and 26th St.
3:30 pm (approx.): Tree of Life Ceremony in Powderhorn Park
1:00 – 7:00 pm: Festival in Powderhorn Park
Website: www.hobt.org

In the Heart of the Beast Theatre will celebrate the 37th anniversary off the annual MayDay Parade and Festival on Sunday, May 1. Every year, thousands of people gather together to welcome the return of spring to Minnesota at this event. In preparation, during the month of April, our theatre will be transformed into a giant community art studio and opened to the public for the building of the parade.

Workshop participants will be given an overview of the Parade theme and then invited to choose which section of the Parade they would like to work on. Participants can come to as many or as few workshops as they want, and their creation will be theirs to keep after the Parade.

Workshops are free and open to everyone; no reservations or experience necessary. Children are welcome but must be supervised by adults at all times. Please wear clothes and shoes that are appropriate for painting.

In the Heart of the Beast Puppet and Mask Theatre (HOBT) is a singular theater company recognized internationally for both its artistry and its service to the community. Through performance, ceremony, and teaching, HOBT explores and celebrates the human experience and the wonders of the world’s natural and cultural richness. The work of HOBT is strongly grounded in the concerns of its home neighborhood as they relate to regional and global issues. Through its artistry, the theatre brings people together in the hands-on creation of and participation in community-wide puppet and mask events.

 

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

One seed = many fruits Many pieces = one beauty

By Patrick Cabello Hansel

Out of one seed comes many fruits. Out of many broken pieces comes one unique beauty. That is the hope of the “Semilla” Community Arts Program at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Phillips. The idea for Semilla—which means “seed” in Spanish—came from St. Paul’s work in the arts and community organizing over the past several years. This work has included numerous murals, arts camps for youth and productions with In the Heart of the Beast Puppet and Mask Theater. Working with Greta McLain, an accomplished muralist and mosaic artist, the church began this project last year as a way to teach mosaic skills and create beautiful art for the community.

“Mosaic is a wonderful way to bring people together across all sorts of divides: language, culture, neighborhood,” Greta says. “People of all ages and artistic abilities can work together to create beautiful art for their community. There is real healing in taking broken bits of tiles and even broken cups and plates to create something new.”

Mosaic workshops are held every Wednesday night, from 6:30 to 8:00 pm at St. Paul’s, 2742 15th Ave S. Workshop participants of all ages learn basic design and color selection, how to use tile nippers, and both direct and indirect mosaic technique. The training emphasizes learning skills that can then be shared with block clubs, community and other groups.

Greta and the community arts teachers she has trained have led workshops at St. Paul’s Church and St. Paul’s Apartments, a low-income housing project for seniors, and El Colegio Charter School. They will begin working with students and parents at Andersen School in April, and on Lake Street in late spring.

Phase one of the project will create beautiful mosaic flower planters throughout the community. Phase two will continue to create planters, while expanding to create murals that combine both painting and mosaic. Included will be a new gateway into Andersen School.

A Community Arts Camp for youth ages 12-18 will be held at St. Paul’s the week of June 12. Youth will be trained in mosaic and mural arts, as well as learn how to organize their communities using the arts.

Funding for the project has been provided in part by a grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board, through an appropriation by the Minnesota State Legislature, a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and private funders.

For more information, call St. Paul’s at 612-624-3862 or e-mail: stpaulscreate@aol.com

 

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Geneology Second only to Gardening

How does geneology become accurate when almost identical markers with common date of death, February 11, 1914, for brothers Lars G. Anderson and Lars G. Nelson is juxtaposed with the “burial cards” with names as Lars and Louis Stublein including death on January 10, 1909. Markers are at Block E, Lot 20 of Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery and records are in Cemetery office amongst those of the other 20,000 +people buried there.

by Susan Hunter Weir

Genealogy is the second most popular hobby in America (gardening is first). Genealogy is like solving puzzles—finding that one clue that leads you to the maiden name of your great-great-grandmother or locating the name of the town where she was born. Millions of people spend their leisure time searching the internet, digging through trunks in attics and reading obituaries looking for information about long-lost relatives.

The cemetery office has records on all of the 21,000 people buried there. The amount and type of information varies a little bit and tends not to be as complete for the earliest burials (the 1850s and 60s) as it is for later ones. Every person has a burial card, and most cards contain information about that person’s age, place of death and cause of death. Some contain birthdates and birth locations. For those who died after 1876 there are burial permits as well.

Grave locations are recorded in a large plat book. The original plat book was created during the Depression, a project of the Works Progress Administration. It is drawn with India ink on vellum and individual graves are hand tinted. Occupied graves are colored green except for veterans’ graves which are red; empty graves are brown. A few years ago, after someone broke into and vandalized the cemetery office, the original plat book was removed to the archives in City Hall. The cemetery has a full-sized, color digitized copy of the original.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Searching – A Serial Novelle Chapter 25: “Something Special for Someone Special”

By Patrick Cabello Hansel

Sometimes you have to stop searching, and let the search find you. Sometimes you have to let go in order to hold onto what you really love. Ana and Luz had confronted their pasts, now it was time to discern where the past was going. And as they walked out into the still swirling snow, they realized they had to do this part of the search alone.

“Luz”, Angel said, timidly. “I think I need to go talk to my mom and dad some more. I want to make sure that you’re OK. I don’t want to leave you alone when…” His voice broke off, and he held his head up to the sky, as if in desperate prayer.

Luz took his arm with her hand. “I’ll be all right, mi amor. I need to see about some things myself. I’ll be OK.”

“I don’t want you to be afraid,” he told her.

“Angel, it’s one thing to be afraid. It’s another to live in fear. Do you know the difference?”

“I think so,” he said. “For most of my life, I thought I had to fight my way through every trouble. If I was afraid, I got tougher. If I didn’t know how to do something, I worked harder. I think maybe I have to learn something different now.”

Then the two embraced. It was an embrace of two people who know that they may never see each other again. Fear, longing, love, hope intertwined in their hug. It was the hug of brothers or sisters who cross oceans or deserts to find a new life in a new land. Children taken from their parents arms by the brutal hand of the conquistadors. Grandchildren saying goodbye to the grandparents at the nursing home. Luz and Angel held on, not so much for dear life, but to remember, in their muscles, the love they would never give away. Even if they lost.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Food Obsession: WHAT DID I TELL YOU?

By Jane Thomson

I said to read the whole recipe before making the dish. Here are a couple of recipes that are easy to make if certain very specific instructions are followed. They are in caps here, but such details don’t always hit you in the eye when you give a recipe the once-over.

BEER BREAD – this quick bread goes with anything and is good toasted. I got the recipe from Mary Gardner, who lives upstairs in my building. She is a frequent host; also an author and teacher at the Loft Literary Center. Among other books, she has written Outlaw Biker – My Life at Full Throttle with her friend, Deadeye Hayes.

Turn oven to 350 degrees. Grease an average-size bread pan very well.

12 oz. beer AT ROOM TEMPERATURE

¼ cup sugar

3 cups of “SELF-RISING” flour: no substitutions; no mixtures

Mix sugar with flour, mix in beer, pour mixture into bread pan. Bake for 45 minutes; cool on rack, turning out of pan after about 15 minutes.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Lake Street Council Annual Awards

The Lake Street Council (LSC) announced 2011 Annual Awards during 43rd Annual Meeting at Safari Restaurant and Banquet Hall, 3010 4th Avenue South March 15th.

“Each of these businesses has shown exemplary innovation and community responsibility,” Joyce Wisdom, LSC Executive Director, said. “They are committed to the betterment and economic vitality of Lake Street.”

Best New Lake Street Business Start Up

Lake Wine & Cheese, Binh and Christina Le

Binh and Christina took the former G & L Furniture store, which had been looking a little shabby, and extensively remodeled it for Lake Wine & Cheese. The Le family has a background in food/beverage retail and restaurants, operating the Arby’s and Ben and Jerry’s outposts at MSP Airport and the Metro Liquor Warehouse in St. Paul, along with a few other businesses around the country. They bring a focus on customer service to this business.

Lake Wine and Cheese is a stylish concept, combining the liquor store with cheese shop/deli/gourmet foodstuff retail, operated by Ken Liss. Lake Wine and Cheese feels like a cozy, European-style market.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
 Page 203 of 231  « First  ... « 201  202  203  204  205 » ...  Last »