NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Tuesday February 18th 2020

Keep citizen journalism alive!

Donatebutton_narrow

Archives

Phillips Neighborhood Clinic Children’s Clinic Night

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Spirit of Phillips – Impeachment

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Raise Your Voice – More War Won’t Work

Peter Molenaar

By PETER MOLENAAR

Not long ago, I woke to the news of assassination… head swimming with visions of missile launches to and fro, skyrocketing oil prices, etc., etc. A quick study of relevant history commenced, before and after a trip to 4200 Cedar Avenue, where a consultation with WAMM (Women Against Military Madness) took place.

Minnesota’s leadership was bound to speak as well. Our own brave light, Ilhan Omar, stated: “Sending teenagers to die, or to return with lifelong wounds is not what it means to carry out our oath of office to protect the American people.”

From across the river, Congresswoman Betty McCollum stated: “President Trump’s decision to assassinate Iranian Major General Qasem Soleimani inside Iraq will have severely negative consequences on U.S. interests around the world… Further, it strengthens the Iranian regime’s domestic hold on power… Americans now know that 17 years of war in Iraq was based on a manufactured lie.”

On the other hand, Trump’s pal Pompeo has stressed: “U.S. resolve to hold Iran accountable for its interventions [in the Middle East].” Oh, really [!!!]

Sadly, Senator Amy Klobuchar’s echoes blamed Soleimani for “destabilizing” Iraq and Syria. Never mind his many contributions to the struggle against ISIS, yes, the ISIL which would not have formed if not for the U.S.A. invasion.

Note: 

I was among those who called the Senator’s office to point out the discrepancy, suggesting she had been ahistorical and a tad dishonest. Her staff person was very cordial. Moreover, Amy’s email response was, I think, personal (not robotic).

So, why?

According to Adel Abdul Mahdi, Prime Minister of Iraq, Soleimani had come to mediate the showdown between Riyadh and Tehran in Yemen. Indeed, it was a peace mission intent upon addressing a dire humanitarian crisis. Such was the nature of the “imminent threat” to our “national interests”… a threat to Trump’s arms sales to Saudi Arabia.

So now, the Iraqi government has asked U.S. forces to leave. “We” refused to go. But then, apart from the moral outrage leveled by the world against our nation, perhaps “We, the People” will embrace a simple slogan: More War Won’t Work.

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Cultural Wellness Center

Dreamland on 38th Street – Cultural Healing through Culinary Heritage

Serial entrepreneur and civil rights advocate Anthony Brutus Cassius knew the dreamers of his day needed a place to gather and plan, create and connect. Cassius first found that space at Foster’s Sweet Shop, where he and other prominent black Minneapolitans met monthly and strategized for civil rights in the 1930s. Among friends and fellow reformers, Cassius learned the importance of social entrepreneurism. Inspired by what he found at Foster’s Sweet Shop, Cassius opened the Dreamland Café on 38th Street and Fourth Avenue in 1937, in the heart of the south side’s black community. In highly segregated Minneapolis, many considered the Dreamland Café to be the only social center for African-Americans, and the restaurant drew celebrities like Lena Horne and Frankie Lymon when they came to town.

4RM+ULA rendering of Dreamland Co-Café and Cultural Wellness Center from E 38th Street looking East.

Dreamland Café Reimagined 

Today, 38th street is poised to become one of six cultural districts in Minneapolis, created to drive economic development in the city’s most diverse neighborhoods. Dreamland on 38th will be an anchor project in the 38th Street Cultural Corridor. Dreamland on 38th is a joint venture between the nonprofit Cultural Wellness Center, one of the original founders and co-owners of the Midtown Global Market, and African-American entrepreneur Dr. Freeman Waynewood. Building on the experience and expertise of the Cultural Wellness Center, Dreamland on 38th will provide cultural healing through culinary heritage. 

The vision is to create a flexible, supportive work space for African-American entrepreneurs to start and expand small businesses focused on the intersection of food and heritage—and to offer a dynamic space to host community gatherings and events. Dreamland on 38th will leverage the Cultural Wellness Center’s many cultural, community and business networks to create social and economic opportunities that enrich African-American entrepreneurs, entities and services. 

With its unique mission, Dreamland on 38th honors the legacy of A.B. Cassius, his social entrepreneurism, his commitment to building a strong black community in Minneapolis—and his focus on food as a way to bring people together. 

Core Aspects of the Project 

Dreamland at 38th features the construction of a three-story, 7,500-square-foot building on a vacant parcel at 38th Street and 3rd Avenue South. Since 2018, the Cultural Wellness Center and Dr. Waynewood have been collaborating with 4RM+ULA, an African-American-owned architecture firm, to design a building to house the:

  • Dreamland Co-Café, an innovative food business incubator program and commercial kitchen anchored by Dreamland Culinary Heritage, an established African-American-owned catering business incubated by the Cultural Wellness Center; 
  • Cultural Wellness Center’s administrative offices, from which they will offer entrepreneur development services, co-working space and knowledge production in education, housing and health; and 
  • Community meeting and event space, including a rooftop with downtown views. 
Read the rest of this entry »
Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

December 2019/January 2020 edition of The Alley

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Phillips Community is focus of syringe disposal pilot program

By LINDSEY FENNER

The City of Minneapolis is piloting a project for syringe litter clean up and disposal, centered around the Phillips Community. The project is in response to the concerning amount of syringe litter Phillips residents encounter on a daily basis. The City began doing syringe litter sweeps in July and August along Bloomington Avenue, the Greenway, and adjacent alleys. Most recently, in November, the City installed ten Syringe Drop Boxes in and near Phillips to continue to address the issue. The boxes will be emptied weekly and can be easily reinstalled if the location needs to be adjusted. According to a city spokesperson, 800 syringes have been collected from the Drop Boxes between November 6 and November 27, with the majority collected at 25th and Bloomington. In addition, there will be a pilot of 30 syringe disposal buckets for use by businesses and non-profits. The project is currently funded by a grant from the National Association of County and City Health Officials, with a recommendation by Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey to include funding in the 2020 Minneapolis budget.

LINDSEY FENNER

The syringe disposal pilot was presented at a community meeting on November 2 at the Sabathani Community Center. Mayor Jacob Frey, District 4 Hennepin County Commissioner Angela Conley, and a variety of city and county staff spoke about the opioid epidemic and related public health concerns over improper syringe disposal in our community. Ward 9 Council member Alondra Cano, who represents East Phillips and Midtown Phillips, other staff did not appear to be present. Ward 6 Council member Abdi Warsame, who represents Phillips West and Ventura Village; and Hennepin County Board Chair Marion Greene both sent staff representatives. 

Read the rest of this entry »
Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Two lives well lived together

By LAURA WATERMAN WITTSTOCK

It is often said of two people who have been together for many years that they give great gifts to one another beyond the gifts of love and caring. That and much more was true of David and Linda Back McKay, married for thirty-five years before her untimely death. Linda was a young and published poet when she went to KFAI in the Phillips Neighborhood, drawn to its volunteer strength and driven by her own desire to learn prose writing in the hot atmosphere of news deadlines rather than in a cool, dry academic classroom. There she met David McKay in about 1983. David taught her how to meet deadlines by selecting and re-writing the latest news items that would be of interest to KFAI listeners. 

COURTESY OF THE McKAY FAMILY David McKay and Linda Back KcKay (April 21, 1947 – September 17, 2019)

In the early 80s the radio station was a primary news source, tuned into by thousands of listeners in the pre-internet and pre-cellphone days. News was available that could not be heard over what was considered mainstream and it was a joy for David and Linda to provide it for KFAI listeners. News was expected to include a progressive perspective and cover issues not heard over commercial radio. There was little indication that something really big was on the horizon that would threaten radio, and what was then known as television and print, picking them up like fragile toys and breaking them in the fall. The internet and media have grown way beyond early expectations, but community radio and print are still standing and David is still volunteering there. 

Read the rest of this entry »
Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

What’s Up at Your Community Libraries

FRANKLIN LIBRARY EVENTS
Franklin Library building is closed for renovation, but there are still library events going on in and around Phillips! 

LitKnit (for all ages)
Mondays beginning January 6, 3:30-4:30pm
Waite House, 2323 11th Ave S, Minneapolis, MN 55404
LitKnit circles are inter-generational spaces where neighbors spend time together learning a craft and sharing stories. Improve your craft skills, get to know your neighbors and find connection within your community. Funded by Minnesota’s Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

Coffee & Conversations (for adults)
Tuesday, January 7, 10am-12pm
Minneapolis American Indian Center, 1530 E Franklin Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55404
Join Franklin staff for free coffee and doughnuts. Learn about upcoming library events and enjoy visits by special guests and hands-on activities. Jan. 7th join Deanna Beaulieu who will be leading an interactive Beading Class.

EAST LAKE LIBRARY
2727 E. Lake Street
W, F, Sa: 9am-5pm
M, T, Th: 9am-8pm

Su: 12-5pm

Youth and Families

Homework Help
M, T, Th: 4-7pm
Free in-person tutoring for K-12 students. No advance sign-up needed. Tutors available September 16 to May 21, except on holidays and school breaks.

Stories Together: Noon Year’s Eve
Tuesday, December 31,
11:30am-12:30pm

For kids of all ages and their caregivers. Count down to noon and celebrate the new year with stories, music, movement and activities!

Family Storytime
Fridays, starting January 3, 10:15-10:45am
For children of all ages and their caregivers. Talk, sing, read, write, and play together. Share books, stories, rhymes, music, and movement.

Baby Storytime
Fridays starting January 3, 11:15-11:45am
For children from birth to 24 months and their caregivers. Talk, sing, read, write and play together in a format especially designed for babies. Share books, stories, rhymes, music and movement.

Adults

Mobile Law Library
Monday, December 16, 2-5pm
Monday, January 6, 2-5pm
Connect with librarians from Hennepin County Law Library about legal resources and support.

City of Minneapolis Small Business Support
Tuesday, December 17, 3-5pm
Tuesday, January 21, 3-5pm
City of Minneapolis Small Business Team will be available to support individuals hoping to start or who are currently running a small business in Minneapolis. No appointment necessary. Collaborator: City of Minneapolis Small Business Team.

Sealing Your Criminal Record
Thurs, Dec 19, 12:30-2:30pm
Thurs, Jan 16, 9:30-11:30am
Learn the process of how to seal your criminal record, also called “expungement.” Find out which criminal records can be sealed, the information needed to file, where expungement clinics are held, and how to be prepared to get the most out of your time with either a private attorney or at an expungement clinic. Please arrive on time and plan to stay for the entire session. Collaborators: Volunteer Lawyers Network, Hennepin County Law Library.

HOSMER LIBRARY
347 E. 36th Street
M, T, W: 9am-8pm
Th, F, S: 9am-5pm Su: 12-5pm

Youth and Families

Family Storytime
Thursdays, Jan 9 – Feb 27, 10am
For children of all ages and their caregivers. Talk, sing, read, write, and play together. Share books, stories, rhymes, music, and movement.

¡La Música y la Familia!/Music and Family!
Sat, January 25, 10-10:45am
For children ages 1-5. Hands-on musical play activities led by early childhood music specialists will let your family experience music’s impact on learning and reading readiness. Together you will sing, rhyme, read, move and create! Program will be conducted half in Spanish, half in English. Collaborator: MacPhail Center for Music. Funded by Minnesota’s Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

Note: Please register each child attending. A maximum of two caregivers per registered child may also attend.

Ve el impacto de la música en la preparación de lectura. Actividades y juegos enseñadas por especialistas de música para niños. ¡Juntos vamos a cantar, rimar, leer, mover y crear! El programa será mitad en español y mitad en inglés.

Nota: Por favor registre a cada niño que va a asistir. Un máximo de dos cuidadores por niño registrado podrá asistir.

Teen Tech Workshops
Tuesdays, 4:30-6pm
Get creative and make music, crafts, animation and other projects using high- and low-tech tools, everything from iPads and 3D printers to perler beads and sewing machines. Led by the library’s Teen Tech Squad. Sponsor: Friends of the Hennepin County Library. Suitable for preteens and teens.

Homework Help
M, T: 3:30-7:30pm Sa: 1-4pm
Free in-person tutoring for K-12 students. No advance sign-up needed. Tutors available September 16 to May 21, except on holidays and school breaks.

Adults

Conversation Circles
Saturdays, 10:30am-12:30pm
Non-native English speakers: practice your English and make new friends in an informal, volunteer-led setting, and learn about the library, too.

Seed Sorting Party
Sunday, December 22, 3-4:30pm
Help sort and label donated seeds for the Community Seed Library! A seed library is a collection of community-donated seeds that can be borrowed from the library and planted at home. Volunteer while learning more about seed saving and gardening. Collaborator: Plant-Grow-Share, a project of CANDO (Central Area Neighborhood Development Organization)

Researching the History of Your Home
Saturday, January 4, 10-11:30am
Learn about the historical resources at the library and across the county that will help you piece together a history of your Hennepin County house, neighborhood or property. Staff from Hennepin County Library’s Special Collections will explain print and online resources – including permit records, maps, photos and more – and will set you on the path to jump-start your research. Register online.

Coffee and Conversations
Monday, January 13, 10-11am
Join library staff for coffee and conversation. Share stories about the library and thoughts about the renovated space.

Senior Surf Day
Thursday, January 30, 1-3pm
Learn computer basics, how to navigate and search the internet and how to access websites of interest to seniors. Get hands-on computer experience with help from representatives of the Senior LinkAge Line®. Collaborator: Minnesota Board on Aging and Metropolitan Area Agency on Aging. Register online.

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Phillips West – December 2019/January 2020

Phillips West Neighborhood Events: www.phillipswest.info

By CRYSTAL WINDSCHITL

No December Board Meeting
No January or February Community Meetings

Phillips West Neighborhood Organization will have no December Board Meeting and no January or February Community Meetings.

Thursday, February 13th, 5-8 pm
Annual Winter Social
PWNO Will have the Annual Winter Social on Thursday, February 13th, 5 to 8 p.m. at the Center for Changing Lives Centrum Room 2400 Park Avenue.

Read the rest of this entry »
Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Milton Worth – Ramsey Author with eyes on the sky found beauty on earth and, on Fort Road renamed Hiawatha Avenue

Tales from Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery
By SUE HUNTER WEIR
172nd in a Series

If you could choose just one word to have inscribed on your grave marker, what word would you choose? Milton Worth Ramsey didn’t get to choose his own word; he didn’t even have a marker until almost 80 years after he died. He died in 1906 and his descendants placed a new marker on his grave some time in the 1980s. The word that they chose to sum up his life was “author.”

And he most certainly was. According to his obituary, he was “for many years…identified with the literary life of the city…” He self-published four novels, and he is still recognized as having been an early science-fiction/speculative fiction writer. His first work, “Six Thousand Years Hence,” was published in 1891; followed by “The Austral Globe” (1892); “Future Dark Ages: a Story of a Trip Through a Dark Continent” (1900); and “Two Billions of Miles: or, The Story of a Trip Through the Solar System” (also 1900). Although one relative claimed that Jules Verne had plagiarized Ramsey’s work, that’s unlikely since Verne’s most famous works were published in the 1860s.

Read the rest of this entry »
Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
 Page 3 of 219 « 1  2  3  4  5 » ...  Last »