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Monday August 19th 2019

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Navigation Center closes

Coalition partners involved in the temporary Navigation Center in south Minneapolis reflected June 3 on the months’ long effort to provide a safe and service-rich environment for people formerly living at the Franklin-Hiawatha homeless encampment.

The Navigation Center at 2109 Cedar Ave. S. has closed after operating since late December of 2018. At its peak occupancy, it provided beds and shelter to 176 people in three sprung structures. Seventy-four people who stayed at the center have been connected to housing, nursing homes or treatment programs — a high success rate compared to traditional shelters. 

Red Lake Nation, Simpson Housing Services and the Metropolitan Urban Indian Directors (MUID) partnered to provide services onsite and led transition efforts while the city of Minneapolis provided funding and support for the Navigation Center.

Through the Navigation Center, people were able to secure an array of services including pathways to permanent housing, income, healthcare and stability. Individual case management services were provided onsite by partner agencies and included traditional American Indian healing activities, all of which were voluntary. 

Red Lake Nation will build a culturally sensitive, 110-unit affordable housing development on the Navigation Center site, with a treatment clinic on the first floor.

This update by city consultant Margaret King, who managed the Navigation Center, was shared by Ward 9 Council Member Alondra Cano in her e-newsletter.

 

46 STILL LIVING AT 

CENTER AS OF May 22

• 10 had firm housing or treatment 

admission dates for prior to June 3

• 28 had alternate shelter for interim 

period before getting firm housing

• 8  were not accepting services

130 exits as of May 22, 2019

• 68 positive

• 60 negative

• 2 deaths

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Backyard Community Health Hub July 2019

ckyarsd

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Midtown Phillips update July 2019

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Ventura Village July 2019

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EPIC update July 2019

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Transit: The cacophony of the 6

By JOHN CHARLES WILSON

In 1999, Jennifer Lopez released an album titled “On the 6.” Of course, she meant the New York subway line, not the Minneapolis bus line, but I digress: rather than being musical, the cacophony of letters on the southbound 6 are a pain in the neck.

There are two versions of the 6 northbound: 6 and 6U. 6 goes downtown and 6U goes through downtown to the University of Minnesota. However, going southbound, we have eight letters to contend with. My friends at https://streets.mn think this is “Ludacris,” and I agree. I propose a Great Simplification:

• 6A – To 36th and Hennepin. Only runs twice a day, and is intended as a “helper” bus to relieve overcrowding in the Uptown area at the height of rush hour. This bus can be kept as is.

• 6B – Southdale via Wooddale. Hardly anyone gets on or off on the Wooddale branch except at rush hour. Move Wooddale buses to France Ave. off-peak and running an express route with a different number, say 556, to serve Wooddale at rush hour.

• 6C – Southdale via Xerxes. Keep this route but renumber it 6X – X for Xerxes. I know Metro usually uses X to denote a bus headed to the garage, but this is a worthwhile exception.

• 6D – Southdale via France. Keep this route but renumber it 6F – F for France. Same logic as above.

• 6E – Fuddruckers via Xerxes. I recommend cutting this route off at Southdale and run a shuttle with a separate number, say 506, to Fuddruckers. Perhaps a smaller bus could be used and go directly to building doors, so people won’t have to walk so far.

• 6F – Fuddruckers via France. Same recommendation as 6E.

• 6G – 50th and Xerxes. Runs school days only, primarily for Southwest High School students, though legally anyone can ride them. These could be kept as is, but renumbered 6H – H for High School. Though 6S – S for Southwest or S for School is tempting, people might mistakenly think it’s S for Southdale.

• 6K – Edina Industrial Park. This area should be served by a shuttle starting at Southdale, similar to the one replacing the E and F. Perhaps its number could be 506P – P for Park. The letter I (which would be for Industry) is never used due to its similarity to a 1.

Voila! Four letters instead of eight!

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What’s up at the Franklin Library July 2019

By ERIN THOMASSON

All Ages
Dabaal-dega Dhaqanka Somaliyeed / Somali Cultural Festival

Saturday, July 6, 11am – 4pm
Kaalay oo la Dabaal deg Maktabadda Franklin Hiddaha iyo Dahaqanka Soomalida! Qofwalbo waan soo Dhoweyneynaa.

Come celebrate Somali Culture with Franklin Library! All are welcome. Funded by Minnesota’s Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

Read Together
Tuesdays, 1-2 pm 

Practice reading and enjoying books one-on-one or in a small group.

Franklin on the Green

Tuesdays, 3-4:30 pm

Play games outside this summer! We will have badminton, soccer, frisbee and other games set up to play, weather permitting.

Learn Together: Connect and Play

Tuesdays, 6-6:30 pm

 Connect with your child during this drop-in program exploring early literacy activities. Join your neighbors each week for a different theme including music, art, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math), reading and creative play.

Science Wednesdays

Wednesdays, 3-4:30 pm

Join us for a STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art, mathematics) activity each week!

Electronic Music Workshop

Wednesday, July 24, 6:30-7:30 pm

Entering grades 3-12. Make beats and experiment with electronic music production in a space that empowers girls, non-binary and trans youth. All are welcome! Collaborator: Beats by Girlz.

Puzzlemania!

Thursdays, 3-5 pm

Enjoy a variety of educational and fun puzzles and games!

Game On!

Thursdays, 5-7 pm

Join us for all types of gaming! Enjoy card games, board games, Xbox, VR and more. Play an old favorite or learn a new one.

West African Drumming & Dance

Thursday, July 25, 5-6 pm

Learn traditional rhythms and dances from Guinea in West Africa. Practice basic hand technique, patterns and timing on the djembe. Learn fun energetic dances with steps will be broken down for all levels, accompanied by live drumming. All are welcome. Collaborator: Duniya Drum & Dance.

Family Storytime

Fridays, 10:30-11 am

For children of all ages and their caregivers. Talk, sing, read, write and play together in a format appropriate for young children. Share books, stories, rhymes, music and movement.

Teen programs

15 Minute Guitar and Voice Lessons

Thursdays, July 11 & 18, 4:30-6:30 pm

Registration Required: Sign up in person at Franklin Library on the day of the lesson.

Come participate in a 15-minute one-on-one voice or guitar lesson with local musicians, Dallas & Siama! Learn to sing or play guitar for the first time or learn tips to improve your gifts in a welcoming environment. Use our guitar or bring your own.

Urban 4-H Club

Tuesdays, 5–7 pm

We do everything from urban gardening to digital photo/video to theater. Partner: University of Minnesota.

Teen Tech Workshop

Wednesdays, 5-6:30 pm

Get creative and make music, videos, animation and other projects using both high- and low-tech tools, everything from iPads and 3D printers to synthesizers and sewing machines. Led by the library’s Teen Tech Squad.

Adults

Open Crafting

Monday, July 1, 1-3 pm

Looking for a space to sew, knit or work on other crafts? Bring your current project and materials and join us! Sewing machines, knitting needles and other equipment will be available for your use.

Fasal furan oo ku Saabsan Barashada Teknoolojiga Maktabadda/Library Technology Open Lab

Wednesdays, July 3, 10 & 17, 10:30-12 pm

Come and explore library technology. Staff will start each Open Lab with a 20-minute orientation to library technology. Following the orientation, participants will have time to explore on their own, while staff will be available for questions and one-on-one support. Schedule of topics:

July 3: Scanning and printing

July 10: Creating a library account, using the library catalog

July 17: Online library databases for learning, literacy and employment

Master Gardener: Container Gardening

Thursday, July 11, 6-7:15 pm

Container gardening allows you to add color to your garden, deck or front steps with limited time commitment. Learn to select containers, a good potting mix, ideal plants and how to care for these beautiful mini gardens. Collaborator: Hennepin County Master Gardeners, University of Minnesota Extension.

Franklin Technology Hour

Thursdays, July 11, 18 & 25, 12-1 pm

Do you want to explore new technology, practice using a computer program, or learn more about the library’s electronic resources? Then come to Franklin Technology Hour! Bring your questions or come and explore a spotlighted resource.

Work of Art: Grantwriting for Artists of Color and Native Artists Panel

Thursday, July 18, 5:30-7:30 pm

Registration Required.  A panel of experts will take a look at the grantwriting process and discuss how POCI artists can successfully navigate the application process. Collaborator: Springboard for the Arts. Funded by Minnesota’s Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

Power in Participation: Voter Education Workshop

Tuesday, July 30, 10-11 am

Learn about elections, the voting process, and civic engagement. Great for first time voters! Non-partisan and open to all. Explore a new topic each month. July 30: Ways to Register. August 27: How You Can Vote. Collaborator: Black Votes Matter MN.

Franklin Learning Center: 612-543-6934

The Franklin Learning Center offers free, one-to-one tutoring for adults who are learning English and math, preparing for the GED and citizenship exams, and gaining life skills. We are always looking for community volunteers! No experience necessary; we provide training and materials. Contact us at 952-847-2934 or flc@hclib.org.

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Phillips West update July 2019

By CRYSTAL WINDSCHITL

Check out the Phillips West Website: www.phillipswest.info

No meeting

There will be no July 4 Phillips West Community Meeting due to 4th of July.  Hope everyone has a great July! Contact Crystal at 612-879-5383 or email her at pwno2005@yahoo.com

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Cemetery: Flagpole cost $271.55, is still up 90 years later

Tales from
Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery

By Sue Hunter Weir

166th in a Series

The 1920s was the age of flappers and speakeasies, of dance marathons and flagpole-sitting contests.  

The national mood was upbeat and there seemed to be enough money to do whatever needed to be done.  While members of the recently formed Minneapolis Cemetery Protective Association (MCPA) would never have been mistaken for flappers or bootleggers, they had big plans and in 1928 they began their work in earnest. 

Their plans included a flagpole.

In May 1927 the Minneapolis City Council had voted to issue $50,000 in bonds to be sold to buy out the remaining interests of Layman family members (the third generation of Minneapolis Layman family members) and to make some much-needed improvements. The grounds were a mess.In some places wooden coffins had disintegrated, creating large craters, and in other places dirt was mounded around the emptied graves of the approximately 5,000 people whose remains were disinterred and relocated to other cemeteries.  

The cemetery needed a fence and the MCPA wanted to erect monuments that celebrated the achievements of some of the city’s pioneers and soldiers.

Photo Tim McCall
Memorial Day keynote speaker Lt. Col. Lori J. Allert was the first woman in 151 years.

In January 1928, the city council granted the MCPA’s Auxiliary (women) exclusive rights for selling flowers and plants in the cemetery.  That may sound insignificant but at the time the number of visitors to the cemetery on Memorial Day weekend numbered not in the dozens or even hundreds, but in the thousands.

On Feb. 10, 1928, the city council voted to rename the cemetery. Although the cemetery’s official name in its early days was Minneapolis Cemetery, it was (and still is) commonly referred to as Layman’s Cemetery after its original owners.  The cemetery’s official name is Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery.

Photo Tim McCall
Students from the Minnesota Transitions Charter School participate in the 2019 Memorial Day events at the Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery.

In June 1928. the MCPA announced that they had set up a trust fund and had already raised $1,000 to supplement the city’s $4,000 budget for operating and maintaining the cemetery. With an eye toward raising additional revenue, in July 1928 the MCPA asked the city council to amend an earlier ordinance and allow new burials in the cemetery. They argued that the cemetery was no longer (if, indeed, it had ever been) a threat to the city’s health and safety.  Their request was not immediately accepted and was referred to the council’s Committee on Public Welfare where it seems to have disappeared.  

On July 31, the city council voted to accept $160 from the Auxiliary for repairs to the caretaker’s cottage. What those repairs were is not clear.

Earlier, in May 1928, the Auxiliary had made an even bigger gift to the city. They donated $256.80 to raise a new 50-foot steel flagpole set on top of a limestone base.Andrew Skoberg and Sam Walsen, two stonemasons, constructed the flagpole’s base using three tons of stone and 15-cubic feet of mortar. They each spent 17 hours on the job and were paid $1.38 an hour for their labor. The MCPA bought them lunch on May 2 at a cost of 50 cents each.  The steel flag staff cost $135 and the plaque cost $70. The city supplied $14.75 worth of materials bringing the total cost to $271.55. 

Photo Tim McCall
American Red Cross volunteers huddle under umbrellas during the 2019 Memorial Day events at the Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery.

It was a good investment since more than 90 years later the flagpole is still the focal point of the cemetery.

The flagpole was the first of six monuments donated to the city by the MCPA in honor of the city’s soldiers and territorial pioneers.  Those structures, along with the 1871 caretaker’s cottage, are considered part of the cemetery’s “built environment” and contributed to its being the first cemetery in Minnesota to be designated as an individual landmark in the National Register and later as a city of Minneapolis landmark. 

The efforts of the MCPA also were an important factor in the designation:  their work was considered to be among the city’s early preservation efforts. They worked tirelessly to preserve the cemetery.

Photo Tim McCall
A little guy makes the best of a very soggy event on Memorial Day 2019 at the Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery. It was 151st Memorial Day Observance at the cemetery.

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Cartoon: July 2019 Roof Depot

Cartoon Roof Depot July 2019

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