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Saturday June 24th 2017

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White Earth Wild Rice Venture to France and Beyond Began With Local Artist’s Vision

Minnesota Native American foods to be promoted to Gourmet Entrepeneurs in France. Left to right, Norma Renville-White Earth/Sisseton-Wahpeton, Diane Gorney-White Earth, Carl Fransen-White Earth, Clyde Bellecourt-White Earth, American Indian Movement Interpretive Center Board Members who are launching International marketing of White Earth Wild Rice and walleye and buffalo meat from other Minnesota Tribes at a very large Culinary and Arts Festival at Tours, France May 4 thru 10th. Norma Renville and Diane Gorney are holding 1 pound packages of the Organically certified, Gluten Free REAL Wild Rice harvested by hand at White Earth.

BY HARVEY WINJE

Diane Gorney grew up in Minneapolis, graduated from Central High School, attended college, became an art teacher, and in a later career, did human relations work for the State of Minnesota. While on a trip in the 1990’s, seeing American Indian wild rice in a grocery store in France prompted her to ask the vendor the origin of the rice.  The answer being “from Indonesia” and a similarly shocking answer to a question about American Indian jewelry “from Sri Lanka” caused Diane to wonder why they couldn’t be buying authentic American Indian products from Native Americans in Minnesota. 

Diane’s curiosity and fortitude didn’t include knowledge of marketing and international trade but that counsel she was able to get from Mike O’Dell, a neighbor, who also speaks French.  She then introduced the marketing possibility and Mike to Clyde Bellecourt, who, along with other Board Members and Staff of the American Indian Movement Interpretive Center (AIM IC), worked on the initiative of marketing White Earth wild rice.

From May 4th to May 10th, Clyde Bellecourt, Norma Renville, Eric Byrd, Jack Swanson, Diane Gorney of the AIM IC along with Carl Fransen (White Earth Urban Office and AIM IC), Mike O’Dell (AIM IC), Sean Sherman (The Sioux Chef), and Howasta Means (Gatherings Cafe) will be at Foire de Tours, one of the largest Culinary and Arts Festivals in France, delighting over 300,000 visitors with White Earth wild rice and walleye and buffalo from other Minnesota Tribes.

They will introduce wild rice with samples and recipes in French at Foire de Tours and also at the International Cite’ of Gastronomy in Tours on May 11th. 

World champion Midnight Express Drummers and Native Pride Dancers will also participate in the Foire de Tours. Two tipis will be built for display with paintings done by Wolf Bellecourt.

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Little Earth Mother’s Day Powwow

A FREE Event Celebrating the Spirit of our Community, family friendly, and open to the public; rain or shine.. Be sure to bring your own lawn chair or blanket for seating. No Alcohol, No Drugs, No Fire Arms permitted.

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AMERICAN INDIAN MONTH: FRANKLIN AV, CEDAR FIELD, & TOURS, FRANCE

American Indian Month begins with a Parade along the American Indian Cultural Corridor blocks of East Franklin Avenue and continues with Open Houses, Pow Wows, Fairs, and other special events by the many American Indian organizations here in the Phillips Community and throughout Minnesota.  It is a focused celebration and validation of the rich American Indian traditions, art, music, ceremonies, spirituality and Community that exist all year in ways that invite heightened awareness. American Indian Cultural Corridor Banners are a year-long reminder of the great benefits American Indians and their culture have bestowed on this land for thousands of years.

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May 2017 Alley Newspaper

may-2017-alley-web-combined

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Is Peace Even Possible?

BY PATRICK CABELLO HANSEL

I am writing this on the day that President Trump unveiled his proposed budget, the farthest thing from a “peace budget” that I can remember. It proposes a 10% boost in military spending, even though the U.S. spends more than the next 8 countries combined, and has been involved in more wars since World War II. (And let us ask ourselves as a people, why is every country that we have invaded since WW II been much smaller and poorer than ourselves.) It drastically cuts those things that make for peace: the arts, climate science, foreign aid—even Meals on Wheels. It seems we are regressing further and further away from real peace.

But I am also writing this while listening to Mahalia Jackson. She sings to me: “It is well; it is well with my soul.” It’s not a call of resignation, but a call of faith and hope in the midst of struggle. And we so need that today. Peace is not just the absence of war or violence, but the creation of a society where all enjoy the fruits of the earth; where all have adequate food, water, culture, shelter, security, health care and respect. In Hebrew, the word is Shalom; in Arabic, Salaam. But it means the same thing: a healed world that provides wholeness.

Peace is also walking in that vision of wholeness. I admit it has been challenging for me to maintain a peaceful heart since the past election season. Such hostility—towards immigrants, the poor, refugees, women, LGBT people, Latinos, and so many more. Rhetoric, from all sides, that doesn’t even pretend to care about reconciliation. And now, concrete actions that threaten the fabric of Phillips, our nation and our planet.

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What We Know About Trump So Far

By LAURA WATERMAN WITTSTOCK

American media and the press developed a habit of looking at the first 100 days of a new president’s administration. It is a curious habit because most presidents, whether they serve one or two terms, have one or possibly two great successes, the exceptions being Washington, Lincoln, and Franklin D. Roosevelt and arguably one or two others. This rarity of greatness is partly attributable to a slow and inconsistent growth of the country’s development of policies and laws.

The administrative head of the country is expected to be a level-headed person having good diplomatic skills and an ability to keep the country out of hot wars while steering a steady course of economic growth and keeping the courts and Congress in check. Since Franklin Roosevelt, the country has come to expect more in services from its federal government, a new line from which there has been no retreat. Conservatives want less, liberals want more, but there has been no overall retreat from Social Security, the construction and maintenance of interstate highways, and now a creep toward national health care with the inclusion of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Affordable Care Act.

There has always been a social arc, bending the country more toward guarantees of education, health, and welfare along with a governmental tug toward “freedoms” that limit controls on individual lives. A big one of these is private gun ownership. The Second Amendment was once understood to be a Constitutional right of states to have militias for common protection, but it has been reinterpreted to mean an individual’s right to “bear arms.” The result has been an uncommonly large number of Americans who are shot or murdered every year.

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Phillips West Neighborhood Upcoming Events www.phillipswest.info

April 6th (Thursday) 6:00 to 7:00 p.m.

Phillips West Monthly Community Meeting– Please join the Phillips West Board and Community Members for pizza and updates about what is going on in the Community. Ward 6 City Council & Minneapolis Police will be present to give update. We will also have guests from Public Works to talk about bike lane construction on 26th & 28th. Meeting is located in the Center for Changing Lives Building (2400 Park Avenue, 1st floor Centrum Room). Free parking adjacent to the building is available. For questions please call Phillips West Staff (Crystal) at 612-879-5383 or email her at pwno2005@yahoo.com.

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Pioneer and Soldiers Cemetery Fence Update: Bills on Capitol docket: Call Representative and Senator

BY SUE HUNTER WEIR

Representative Karen Clark has introduced bonding bill (HR 1073) to secure the funds necessary to complete work on the Pioneer and Soldiers Cemetery fence along Cedar Ave and Lake Street. The money would cover the cost of disassembling the limestone pillars, reassembling them using the correct adhesive, and capping them with a protective cover that will prevent erosion by keeping water from seeping into the limestone. The funds will also cover the cost of replacing a section of “historic” chain link along the 21st Avenue side of the cemetery with a section of decorative fencing.

Senator Jeff Hayden has introduced an identical bill in the State Senate (SF 1355). Please consider contacting your Representative and Senator to encourage them to support these bills. If you are represented by one of the bill’s sponsors, please send an email or phone call thanking them for helping us finish this project.

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David Buel Knickerbacker, 1833-1894 1871: Cottage Hospital began near Mills David started it! “Goliaths” own it now!

It was originally printed in the St. Barnabas Annual Report from 1884. The original Cottage hospital is the smaller wing on the right-hand side of the building. The larger portion is what turned the Cottage Hospital into St. Barnabas.

By Sue Hunter Weir

Before health care was big business and before it became a political hot button, it was a charity. The first hospital in Minneapolis, the Cottage Hospital, opened its doors in March 1871. Eight of the hospital’s beds and most of its furnishings were donated by such diverse groups as the Masons, workers in the machine shop at the Milwaukee Railroad, St. Mark’s Parish, the Ladies’ Aid and the Brotherhood of Gethsemane Church.

The hospital was only one of many charitable causes that can be attributed to the Reverend David Buel Knickerbacker, the rector of Gethsemane Church, who saw a need to build the “Cottage Hospital and Home for the Sick and Friendless.” The population of Minneapolis was 13,000 when the hospital opened but many of the town’s people were single immigrant men who worked for the railroads and the mills in jobs that were extremely dangerous. The hospital was located downtown close to the mills for precisely that reason—to be near to the places were accidents were most likely to occur. The Cottage Hospital offered horse-drawn ambulance service.

The Brotherhood of Gethsemane raised money for the hospital by offering lectures and concerts, holding festivals, and by appealing to the public for food, money and supplies through the local newspapers. The public responded and each month a list of the donors and their gifts was printed in the paper. For the most part, they were modest gifts: jars of jam, bandages, reading materials, home grown vegetables, eggs, milk and poultry. They also included brooms, blankets, and an occasional gift of medicinal whiskey. Mill owners donated all of the flour that the hospital needed and the railroad shipped carloads of firewood to the hospital at no cost.

It may sound idyllic but it wasn’t. While the citizens responded to the needs of the poor and helpless, those problems only increased as the city’s population grew and outpaced the hospital’s ability to take care of those who needed help. In the annual report for 1880, the hospital’s superintendent noted that the hospital’s “…capacity has at times been taxed to the utmost, and the city has outgrown the limit of our accommodations. The number of railroads entering here, and the amount of machinery in constant operation makes accidents of [sic] occurrence rendering it necessary to have larger and better accommodation whilst the requirements of the city’s poor demand more room than we have.”

The hospital accepted private patients who could pay for their own care but the majority of patients were charity cases who fell into one of two groups. The $6.00 a week cost of caring for residents of Hennepin County was paid for by the county; the costs of those who were not residents of Hennepin County were paid for by private charitable donations. The hospital’s policy never changed: “Our doors have been thrown open wide for the reception of all colors, nationalities and creeds.”

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Midtown Phillips Neighborhood Association News-April 2017

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