NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Thursday August 6th 2020

Keep citizen journalism alive!

Donatebutton_narrow

Archives

Please Make Minnesota PPE

By LEE LEICHENTRITT

There is a well-known shortage of PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) in the United States. Minnesotans and our fellow countrymen in the other 49 states are suffering because of the shortages of PPE. No employee should go without PPE. No child returning to school in the fall should be without clean and safe daily PPE. No one is expendable or worthless; all human beings should be valued.

One solution to Minnesota’s and America’s PPE shortage would be to invest in making PPE in Minnesota. There are a few options to make Minnesota-made PPE a reality. The first option would be to use the tax code to create incentives to investors to build PPE manufacturing plants in Minnesota. The second would be to establish a public-private partnership. The third would be for the State of Minnesota to build and operate its own PPE plant. The fourth would be for Minnesota and its neighbors to pool their talents and resources to create a multi-state organization that would utilize regional investments in time, talent, and treasure to create PPE.

The aforementioned options are suggestions to fix an ongoing problem this summer. History has shown us that the 1918 pandemic came in waves and that the first wave was not the most fatal. Minnesotans should be aware of the history of 1918 and willing to put shortage solutions into place now. United, we can produce enough PPE for all of our needs, and any surplus PPE could be sold to other states and to Canada.

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Seward Co-op

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Phillips Neighborhood Clinic: Things Open Up

By Harry Leeds

Our lives have changed tremendously over the past few months, and as we very slowly move towards normalcy, it is important to remember your healthy habits. Perhaps the first thing to keep in mind is that we are not out of the woods yet. The State of Minnesota has done a better than average job of social distancing and preparing hospitals. What this means, though, is that the spread of COVID-19 has slowed enough to (likely) ensure that everyone will have access to the medical treatment they deserve if they get sick. That’s what the models suggest, anyway. Social distancing and working from home are still important.

We might have slacked with our old, good health habits, but it is important to keep them up. I have often joked this last month that Jenny Craig is going to make a killing next year. If you are stuck at home, whether you are employed or not, it is tempting to eat junk food. These times are stressful, you worry about the next time you will be able to enjoy that doughnut, and supermarkets have been one of the few businesses to remain open.

The health benefits of eating a plant-based diet in the long term are pretty well established, but it is also important to think about the short term. High calorie foods can cause inflammation in the body, which basically means that your body thinks it is under attack. The effects on your mood and immune system are negative, and a poor diet can make you feel tired, sad, and reduce your ability to fight infection.

There is a way to boost your immune system, feel happier and more energized. That is to exercise. If you can safely go outside for a walk while staying six feet away from others, you might find it will do some good.
It can feel overwhelming to try and keep up these healthy habits, especially with the stress that we are all under. But if you make eating healthy and exercise routine, you may find you will look forward to them. Some people find that rather than thinking about what foods they shouldn’t eat, they think about healthy food they do like (Don’t think, “I shouldn’t eat the doughnut,” but, “I love roasted sweet potatoes.”) If you find yourself with little to do, now is a good time to try out some new recipes. It could be a welcome, and healthy, distraction.

Harry Leeds is a nursing student at the University of Minnesota and nursing clinician at the Phillips Neighborhood Clinic (PNC) 2742 15th Ave. So

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Something I Said: What Good Safeguarding Income by Risking Life to Only Afford a Good Funeral?

By DWIGHT HOBBES

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz extended the corona stay-at-home order through May 18th. While not nearly long enough, it was a welcome reprieve from the threat of people being let loose on the street to keep spreading this catastrophic contagion.

This is no thanks to hundreds who demonstrated in mid-April outside Walz’s home as the Liberate Minnesota Movement, demanding he lift the order. The rationale: it’s costing the economy. Yes, businesses have faltered, even closed and people are laid off, fired. Hence, you had indignant folk hollering slogans like “We can sue! We can revolt over this tyrant. He is supposed to be working for us” and organizer Michelle Even telling Fox News, “We want our rights restored.”

Twin Cities’ activist, Michelle Gross, took a different take, telling “the alley” newspaper, “Forcing communities and businesses to reopen prematurely harms workers. We are seeing this now with the order to reopen meat packing plants. People will be forced to choose between risk and income because anyone who refuses to go back to work at dangerous work sites will lose their unemployment.”

Protesters raising hell over lost income need a reality check. I saw the television coverage and it was a horde of white folk – few wearing masks, none doing social distancing – who look like they never missed a meal a day in their lives. They can just suck it up, make do with less and join the rest of us who’ve busted our asses to keep food on the table all our lives. Bottom line, what good does it do to safeguard your income if you risk not living long enough to do a damned with it except afford a good funeral?

As could be counted on, Trump the Chump, who’s downplayed the crisis and dodged accountability from day one, championed this willfully ignorant lunacy. Well, on May 4, U.S. News & World Report ran the headline “Reopening the Economy Would Add 233,000 Deaths by July but Save Millions of Jobs. In the story, “The number of Americans expected to die from the corona virus by the end of June will nearly double White House estimates circulated as recently as this week for total deaths through the course of the entire outbreak, according to [an] analysis from the Penn Wharton Budget Model.” Talk about do the math.

On May 12, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases director, Dr. Anthony Fauci, told the Senate Committee for Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions that reopening states too soon invites disaster, stating “Problems will escalate if states do not have the hospital capacity to treat patients and to isolate people exposed to the virus.”

Those protesters think there’s a problem now? God help us all if they get their way.

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Ingebretsen’s

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Dave’s Cave

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Ventura Village Neighborhood June News

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Midtown Phillips Neighborhood Association June Community Forums

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

East Phillips Improvement Coalition June Report

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Life Goes On at Takoda Institute—American Indian OIC During Covid-19

Takoda means “All Are Welcome” in Lakota Language

By Takoda Institute Staff

Life goes on at the American Indian OIC—Takoda Institute building and over the Internet. The spring term saw regular Takoda Institute class offerings in the Patient Services Specialist and Computer Support Specialist programs held entirely online with the students and staff working mainly from home and using Zoom, Microsoft Teams, or other online conferencing and learning tools. This was after the instructors took crash courses and the students prepared their devices. As many schools, we have permission from the Higher Ed. Office and our accrediting agency to temporarily conduct classes online.

Classes started on April 13 and are expected to wrap up at end of June, leaving July 6 as the likely starting date for the Summer Qtr. In that quarter, if conditions permit and regulators allow, we hope to offer limited on-site training at a safe distance in our computer rooms while continuing to offer the online alternative. The actual nature of that Qtr. will depend upon both the determination of the AIOIC and of the Governor’s decisions at that time. Looking further ahead, the MN Dept. of Health recently announced they will soon have a plan in place for Higher Ed. as it may look in the Fall of 2020. Their determinations will also shape our method of course delivery in the fall.

Instructor Lloyd Wittstock reported on the gains and losses of the online experience. “We all—teachers and students—have learned from it. Of course, there are differences between face-to-face, all in one place and at one time classes and what we now have. Students like the “lab” portion of the courses on their own. Some send their homework to me right away, while others work later in the day or even into the evening and then send results to me. Some have returned to previous part-time employment with at-home working capabilities as they also complete their education.
On the down side, for one, the total curriculum is hard to fit into the new format. It takes longer to share with each other during the live part of each online session. Second, some courses convert better than others. Keyboarding, for example, works well online because the course needs a lot of individual practice time, so during our online time, we explore various keyboarding software and ways I can sample their progress. Microsoft Office Intro. Class is more oriented to demonstrations and live discussion, and so leaves less class time for their practice, which then goes more into traditional extra homework hours.”

Takoda Institute

Overall Services go on at AIOIC
While Mpls. has been ordered to stay at home for our community’s safety, the team at Takoda/AIOIC is still hard at work to make classes and programs function at the new level of normalcy.

While classes are currently being offered online, other programs are also offering online or over-the-phone assistance. Takoda’s SNAP Outreach Specialist and Enrollment Specialist, Erin Wolf, says: “Anyone who may qualify for grocery assistance can apply online at any time. Clients are encouraged to call or email me with any questions they may have about eligibility or assistance they may need with the application process.” In-person visits to our building at 1845 E. Franklin are by appointment only and will include a temperature check at the entry. Face masks are encouraged.

Contact Erin: 612 341-3358 ext. 113 or erinw@takoda.org to register for long-term Takoda Institute programs, short-term training, or for SNAP services.

Or for youth programs, ShirleenMorseau at ext. 117 or Shirleenm@takoda.org. to set you up with Mpls. Youth Works, for ages 16-24, paid internships, paid work readiness training, paid drivers’ ed classes and more. She also handles Mpls. Works, for those 18 and over, offering employment support for work clothes and transportation.

She is also meeting with youth by appointment only, on Tues, Wed or Thurs.
Barbara Hydeen, Takoda Works Director, helps with: Clients needing a job search or make other use of the Career Resource Room computers, it will be by appointment only on Tues. Wed. and Thurs during hours of 10:00-2:00.
Social distancing: only allow five people in the room to use computers at one time. All appointments to use the room need to go through Angela Fabel who will make a weekly calendar of appointments and coordinate the room activity. Angela at angelaf@takoda.org.

Short-term programs are planning to start up in June. Jose Santos coordinates short-term hands-on training for warehouse workers, forklift and Bobcat drivers and compact excavator operators. Groups are already scheduled for late May and June, and participants are already enrolled. Those wishing to participate in such training in July or on into the fall should contact Erin Wolf.

Jose says that groups will be taught in separate smaller cohorts in different rooms, and sanitary precautions will be taken at the school and at the equipment training sites. He adds, “There are some changes we have made because of the COVID 19. For the months of May, June, July, and August we are not going to provide the Forklift, Boom Lift, and Scissor Lift trainings. HERC-U-Lift has decided that they are not going to provide trainings or let folks on their campus until the fall. They just want to be safe all around for their staff and participants. If all goes well, we can get back to our regular trainings in September.

As for our Warehouse Training Program, folks will still be able to earn five certificates in the following areas: OSHA 10 Certificate, Flagging Certificate, Bobcat Certificate, Compact Excavator Certificate, and Tool Cat Utility Vehicle Machine Certificate.”

More Changes to Follow
The Adult Basic Education and GED room is scheduled to open up for in-person class times starting June 1, and the hours our building is open, currently 9 am to 1 pm, for any visitors, may be expanded in June. Enrollment sessions for a range of programs may also start at that time. As of late May, by order of the Mayor of Mpls, all persons inside public buildings will be required to wear a face mask. For more and up-to-date information, check our website at takoda.org, or the following contact people:
• Food stamp application assistance: erinw@takoda.orgor 612 341-3358 ext. 113 (SNAP)
• Takoda Prep Distance Learning: christyi@takoda.org (That’s the high school)
• Adult Basic Education/GED: ness@takoda.org
• Takoda Institute Career Training: erinw@takoda.org
• Career Counseling/Job Search Support: barbarah@takoda.org
We look forward to serving you at Takoda, whenever and however that becomes possible.

Takoda—”All Are Welcome!”
“Takoda, previously known as the American Indian OIC, was founded in 1979 in response to the damaging education and employment disparities faced by Indigenous people within the Twin Cities metropolitan area. Since its foundation, the organization has grown a workforce of over 25,000 through its culturally-relevant education, training, and workforce programs. Each year, over 900 people, affiliated with tribal nations in the U.S. and Canada, utilize the OIC’s services. Though the OIC was originally founded to strictly serve Native Americans, it has since opened its services and programs to people of every race, creed, gender, age, ability, or sexual orientation. Hence the name “Takoda”, which is a Lakota word meaning ‘all are welcome.’” … “the alley” newspaper, April, 2020 page 1.

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
 Page 4 of 233  « First  ... « 2  3  4  5  6 » ...  Last »