NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Tuesday December 12th 2017

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Phillips Neighborhood Clinic NOVEMBER Highlights!

Nov 15th: We will be hosting our ‘MOVE’ night workout classes- 5 to 7 pm

Nov 20th: Get your EYES checked and get some glasses at our ophthalmology specialty night

Nov 27th: We will be hosting our EAT’ night cooking class –
5 to 7 pm

Nov 30th: PNC will host their monthly FOOT care night, including diabetic foot tests

Monday Nights: Students from the University of Minnesota’s College of LAW to answer any legal questions you may have

Monday’s and Thursday’s: Walk-in FLU SHOT Clinic

Location:

St. Paul’s Lutheran Church

2742 15th Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55407

Hours:

Monday and Thursday from 6 – 9pm

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Ready for Some Football?

By Peter Molenaar

I trust that no Vikings fan from this neighborhood has given up their seat or TV time to boycott the NFL. However, in D. Trump’s words, those who “dishonor our flag” are “sons of bitches.”

The historical “bitch” was, of course, the enslaved woman the master would rape…only to have her mixed-race children torn from her breast and sold “down river.” These were the Black mothers who cradled the men who built the house D. Trump lives in now.

Charlottesville…

We witnessed the Nazis rally their friends, with an eye towards the “final solution.”

To the consternation of “traditional conservatives,” D. Trump did not fully condemn these forces. Yet, push come to shove, such conservatives will combine with the Fascists… democracy be damned. This too, we know from history.

Children ask: What happened to that nice [Black] man who was our president? Yet, some “leftists” denounce even a degree of unity with the Democratic Party. From an anti-fascist standpoint, they are dead wrong. From the standpoint of revolutionary socialist transformation, such leftists are…wrong again!

Imagine, if you will, some few decades down the road, the collapse of the world capitalist order…so too, the “two parties of capitalism” will implode. Social-democratic forces, presently resigned to operating within the Democratic Party, will then of necessity join the effort to transform and rebuild society. It cannot be otherwise.

“Socialism or barbarism?” What nation might evolve should white-supremacy reign supreme? None! Who are the patriots? We are the patriots.

ARE YOU READY FOR SOME FOOTBALL?

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Somali Women Dance the Buraanbur For Health and Cultural Wellness!

Somali women involved in the Backyard Initiative Community Health Action Team (CHAT), Project S.E.L.F., come together each Tuesday and Thursday afternoon at the Brian Coyle Center from 1 to 3 pm to dance the Buraanbur.  The Buraanbur is a traditional dance done by women at Somali weddings and other ceremonies. Miski Abdulle, one of the CHAT leaders of Project S.E.L.F., thought it would be a great way for Somali women to exercise, laugh together and preserve a cultural tradition. One of the younger leaders of this Backyard Initiative CHAT, Rahma Salah, helps to lead and teach this traditional dance.  A drum provides the beat, played by any of the women choosing to do so. The drum rhythm is an organic element of the dancing.

Somali women’s great, great grandmothers have danced the Buraanbur and the steps have been handed down through the generations. Now, at the Brian Coyle Center, this traditional dance is taught and enjoyed by a multi-generational group of women 18 years of age and older. The cultural tradition continues along with laughter and some good exercise .

More About The Activities of Project S.E.L.F. 

Project S.E.L.F. (SAVE, EDUCATE LIBERATE, FREE) is primarily a Somali-focused, immigrant health Community Health Action Team (CHAT), one of the original CHAT’s of the Backyard Initiative. It was established around a program called “Nomadic Expressions”, begun by CHAT leader, Amged Yusuf, aimed to assist youth, elders and families in healthy living and artistic expressions through poetry, open microphone performances, information workshops and community dialogue.  While continuing its original activities, efforts have increased to reach out specifically to Somali women engaged through this Backyard Initiative CHAT through the efforts of Amged’s mother, Miski Abdulle. The women come together to address specific women’s health issues and now to dance the Buraanbur! (see flyer this page).

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October 2017 Alley Newspaper

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AWE OF LONGEVITY

Oppressive Rent Increase = 25 Year Old Business CLOSED!

A Farewell to Sophal and Tevy Nhep

Sophal and Nevy Nhep greeted scores of past customers and served “one last meal” to long time customers like these two women in front of their new Food Service truck replacing their Best Steaks and Gyros business at Chicago Crossings (Franklin Avenue/Chicago Avenue Intersection).

BY PETER MOLENAAR

Best Steaks and Gyros, an original tenant at the Chicago Crossings mall, due to an oppressive rent increase, is now CLOSED after 25 years.  That the proprietor had achieved iconic status in the neighborhood, as was evidence by the gathered farewell throng on Friday September 15th.

One wonders how Sophal and Tevy met, given the exodus from war torn Cambodia in 1975.  Phal would do a stint as an engineering student at the University of Minnesota before the couple reared their three children in Burnsville, MN while Phal was working as a production manager at the Bremer Corporation.

Why the move to this “neck of the woods?” Phal’s answer: “I wanted to be my own boss!”

As for the farewell, we were numerous nationalities and every skin tone, all bound together by the presence of Sophal and Tevy.

Love was in the air.

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The Alley Newspaper Editor Harvey Winje was on FIRST PERSON RADIO with Laura Watermnan Wittstock on Wednesday 9.13.17

Laura Waterman Wittstock at her First Person Radio program at KFAI RADIO 90.3 FM-Mpls. 106.7 FM- St Paul interviewing The Alley Newspaper’s Editor Harvey Winje on Sept 13th. available on kfai.org/archives. Download or listen at http://bit.ly/2xpwLNO.

Listen to Laura Waterman Wittstock as she talked with Harvey Winje about the history of the Phillips Neighborhood, KFAI’s neighbor and home to a large American Indian population. The area of the Phillips Neighborhood began as Indian land but as settlers moved in and Indian families were pushed out, Philips became a welcoming point for newly arriving immigrant families, which in the late 20th Century meant, Hmong, Vietnamese, Somali, other Asian and African groups. Indian people never completely left Phillips. Once rail, bus, and automobile transportation became available, Indians began moving back and forth from reservations to Phillips and back. Harvey has many, many stories to share about his newspaper, The Alley, and the history of the area.

Harvey Winje is a first generation born American, albeit not until his 1940 birth in the community named in the 1960’s  for the abolitionist Wendell Phillips. He serves as the stipend-paid editor of The Alley Newspaper, a 42 year old monthly newspaper of the Phillips Community.  He is a carpenter, small business owner, great-grandfather, and an inveterate keeper of history and building parts.  He has tried, with mixed results and his own self-doubts, to bring seven years of post high school philosophy, history, and religious academic book learning  back to his home community. Harvey has taken his carpentry skills gleaned from his father and older brothers and adapted them to building design & construction management on buildings like the Bailey Building home of KFAI, the KFAI Studio itself, and the Cedar. His long love of community building has been demonstrated in helping to preserve The Alley Newspaper and advocating for the still relevant words of Wendell and Ann Phillips.

First Person Radio

Schedule:

Wednesday, 1:00pm to 2:00pm

DJs:

Laura Waterman Wittstock

Program Categories:

Public Affairs Read the rest of this entry »

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AUTUMN IN OUR HEARTS

This future leader will be able to walk through the English curtain at will and leave it all behind having learned Objibwe and/or Dakota culture, traditions, and language; and the wholeness of the circle of life. He will understand how important autumn is…the timing of the leaves that turn to color – bronze, yellow, orange, red – signal when they choke off the flow of nutrients to their leaves whether winter will be early or late. Photo: Jewell Arcoren

BY LAURA WATERMAN WITTSTOCK

Before cars, before buildings, before the incessant consumption of natural resources, there was another population that went through the seasons, adjusted to disasters, fell in battle, and buried their dead.

In less than 100 years, European settlers managed to wipe out over 90% of the old growth forest in what is now Minnesota. Before the arrival of the French and the Ojibwe, the river along what is now St. Paul, bustled with the canoe and watercraft traffic of the Dakota people and their Hidatsa allies. The canoes, heavy with rice and other grains, headed down the river to what is now St. Louis where a huge trading center was supported by the exchange of goods and services of many tribes. They came back with medicines, new foods, and robes for the winter to add to what they already tanned.

It was labor intensive and women were at the forefront of the trading. The men hunted and defended the villages of the people. In 1834 the missionaries Samuel W. and Gideon H. Pond with Stephen R. Riggers and Thomas S. Williamson put together a Christian version of written Dakota. The resulting dictionary, still in print, has such words as pickle, picnic, pictorial, picture frame, and physics. This was far from the reality of the Dakota people, who came from the stars and understood every plant and tree, every change of season, and every animal in their territory. The printed words stunted their knowledge generation after generation until it seemed they might disappear.

But they did not disappear. The Dakota language, rich and full of meaning and nuance, moved beyond the curtain of English that was papered everywhere in writing and talk. If you know the Dakota language, you can walk through that English curtain at will and leave it all behind. You understand how important autumn is – not just a time to think about buying a sweater.

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Phillips West Neighborhood Upcoming Events October 2017

BY CRYSTAL TRAUTNAU WINDSCHITL

October 5th (Thursday) 6:00 to 7:00 p.m.Phillips West Monthly Community Meeting!

Join your neighbors and other Community Partners for updates from Local City Government & Minneapolis Police. Meeting will take place at the Center for Changing Lives Building in the Centrum Room (2400 Park Avenue).  Free parking is available in the rear of building off of Oakland Avenue.  Free Jakeeno’s Pizza Dinner will be provided!  If you would like more information or would like to get involved in the neighborhood please contact Crystal at 612-879-5383 or email her at pwno2005@yahoo.com

Crystal Trautnau Windschitl is Executive Director of Phillips West Neighborhood Organization

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Transit: Fares Rise: What’s Fair Fare?

BY JOHN CHARLES WILSON

25 Cent Fare Increase Oct. 1

The biggest transit news in Phillips, indeed in the whole Twin Cities, this month is obviously the 25-cent fare increase going into effect October 1st.

Fair Fare Future?

One thing that is interesting about it is that the Met Council is looking at reforming the fare structure to be more equitable. Some things being considered include bringing back distance-based fares (zones) and providing breaks to “reverse” commuters – people who live in the inner city and work in the suburbs. Additionally, a Transit Access Program is now being implemented for people with low incomes. This seems to be an admission that the fares have gotten too high for a major segment of the population.

What’s Fair? Compare to 1970 Fare

There is no cut-and-dried answer to the question of “What’s a fair fare?” but if we compare the current fares with those in 1970, just before the MTC took over Twin City Lines, and adjust for inflation, we find some interesting facts. The base fare in 1970 was 30 cents (equal to $1.88 today). That covered local rides within the city limits of either Minneapolis or Saint Paul. A double fare was charged to go between the two cities. Going to suburbs was an extra 10 cents (equal to 63 cents today) per city boundary crossed. What few express buses existed then had a 5 cent (equal to 31 cents today) tax.

People riding within Minneapolis or Saint Paul, and those taking express buses to the first ring suburbs during rush hour, are paying more now than then. People riding between the two cities or to and from the suburbs (except the limited group mentioned above) are either paying the same or less now (adjusted for inflation) than then. Is this fair to inner-city residents? Does the “temporary” rush-hour tax enacted in 1982 make the fares more or less fair?

Consider what today’s fare structure means in 1970 dollars: The local fare would have been 32 cents non-rush hour and 40 cents rush hour. The express fare would have been 40 cents non-rush hour and 52 cents rush hour. Distance wouldn’t have mattered.

Fare Opinions WANTED!

If you have an opinion on how the fare structure can be more fair, now is the time to get in touch with the Met Council. Their staff is developing a report on this subject which is to be reviewed by the Council in the first quarter of 2018. Let’s hope the results are beneficial to all.

John Charles Wilson is a Whittier Neighborhood resident.

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Bastardy ends in pain, suffering death, and flight

By Sue Hunter Weir

Seduction and broken promises

The child of Martha Anderson and Andrew G. Krogstad was stillborn on January 21, 1875.  Two days later, Martha Anderson (sometimes referred to as Amondson) died from puerperal fever, a complication of childbirth; she was 26 years old.  Her story was in its day an all too-common one—a story of seduction and broken promises.

Suit against prominent suitor

According to the complaint that she filed in court, Martha and Krogstad had met the previous summer.  She was a Norwegian immigrant described by the press as “being of a spotless character.”  Krogstad, also an immigrant, was president of the Norden Society, an important cultural organization for the area’s Scandinavian community.  Despite his prominence, the Minneapolis Tribune took a rather dim view of his character describing him as having a “reputation of being a rake.”

Krogstad had seduced Martha by promising to marry her.  She pleaded with him of several occasions to make good on his promise but he refused.  That left her no choice but to take him to court to try and get financial support for herself and her child.  By going to court, her “ruin” became public knowledge.  Krogstad was arrested and paid a bond of $1,000 (approximately $21,500 in 2017 dollars).

Krogstad was scheduled to appear in court on January 20th, the day before Martha gave birth to their stillborn child.  His case was delayed because of Miss Anderson’s confinement.  Since her doctor was concerned that “she would follow her dead infant into the grave,” he gave permission for her testimony to be taken at her home.

On January 22nd, the Tribune noted that Krogstad’s case had been held over until Wednesday of the following week, but noted that since the baby had died, the case against him was likely to be dismissed.

“Grave covers, suffering, grief, and shame.” Read the rest of this entry »

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