NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Wednesday January 20th 2021

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Library News

By CARZ NELSON 

For updated information on Hennepin County Library services during the Coronavirus Pandemic, visit www.hclib. org. All information is accurate as of October 15, 2020 

Franklin Library at 1413 E Franklin Avenue is open for computer use. Call (612) 543-6925 to make an appointment. The building will remain locked, but staff will let you in at your appointment time. Masks are required and will be provided if you do not bring one. Because of social distancing, staff will be unable to offer computer assistance. You will have access to a desktop computer, Internet, and printing. You will need to bring your own headphones. At this time, Franklin Library is open for computer use ONLY. Other areas and services, including book/DVD checkout, are not available. They will be accept

ing returns during staffed service hours. 

Franklin Library Computer Hours 

Tuesday & Wednesday – 9 AM to 5 PM 

Thursday – Noon to 8 PM 

Friday & Saturday – 9 AM to 5 PM 

Sunday & Monday – Closed 

Franklin Library meal pick-up for youth, Thursdays Noon – 2 PM 

For ages 18 and under. Pick up a week worth of free meals. Caregivers can pick up meals for youth who are not present. Meals include sandwiches, milk, fruit, vegetable, and snack. 

Connect with the library social worker outside Franklin Library, Wednesdays 9am- 5pm: 

• Basic needs (clothing, food, meals, shelter) 

• Chemical Health 

• Disability Services 

• Education & Employment 

• Hennepin County Benefits 

• Housing 

• A listening ear 

• Mental Health Resources 

• Transportation 

Grab and Go Library Service at Hosmer Library: Hosmer Library, 347 E 36th St., is open for retrieving holds, limited browsing of materials, checking out items, returning library materials, quick reference support, computer appointments and printing. Meeting rooms, study rooms, children’s play areas, and lounges will not be available for use at this time. Masks are required and will be provided if you don’t bring one. Check the library website for up-to-date service information and hours. 

Homework Help 

Live, virtual tutors are available through Help Now www. hclib.org/programs/homework-help. 

Physical Materials 

Due dates for physical materials continue to be automatically extended. You are not required to return materials at this time. Libraries are accepting returns during staffed service hours only. Items will be removed from your account after a three-day quarantine. 

Online Library Events: 

The Virtual Cooking Program is coming soon. This program will feature videos from local kitchens such as Sioux Chef and Green Garden Bakery. Check the library website for dates and times. 

There are a growing number of online library events! Check out the schedule by going online to www.hclib.org and click on “Events”. 

E-BOOKS AND AUDIOBOOKS: 

LIBBY: The Libby app is available for iOS and Android devices and is a streamlined way to access downloadable ebooks and audiobooks from OverDrive. You can check out audiobooks right in the app. You can also read eBooks in the app or send them to your Kindle. 

CLOUD LIBRARY: Find downloadable eBooks for readers of all ages. A reader app is also available for Apple, Android and other devices. 

Ask Us: Have a reference or library account question? Call, text, chat with, or email a library worker. 

https://www.hclib.org/ contact 

Call 612-543-KNOW (5669) to reach library staff by phone. 

MONDAY-THURSDAY 9 a.m. – 9 p.m. 

FRIDAY-SATURDAY 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. 

SUNDAY NOON – 5 p.m. 

ESPAÑOL/SPANISH: Llame o envíe un texto al 651-503-8013 para recibir ayuda en español. 

HMOOB/HMONG: Hu losis text rau lub tsev nyeem ntawv ntawm 612-385-0886 txais kev pab hais lus Hmoob. 

SOOMAALI/SOMALI: Caawimaad Soomaali ah, soo wac ama qoraal (text) usoo dir maktabada 612-235-1339. 

Carz is a Phillips resident and an enthusiastic patron of Hennepin County Library. 

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Park & Franklin Lofts Resumes

 By DOUG HOVELSON, Tuffa Associates



 Tashitaa Tufaa speaking

 The constructing of a 43-unit, four-story apartment building at Park Ave. and East Franklin Ave., in the Ventura Village neighborhood has resumed. 

Tashitaa Tufaa, the building owner, says it will help fill a need for moderately priced, family-oriented rental housing in the core neighborhoods of south Minneapolis. “The focus of Park Franklin Lofts is to create attainable housing for people and their families who live and work in the city,” says Tufaa, who is a Twin Cities resident and business owner. 

The 35,000 sq. ft. building’s main entrance will be on Park Ave. and will have nine 3-bedroom and eight 2-bedroom apartments, along with 13 1-bedroom and 13 studio apartment homes. Tenant on-site parking is a 17-stall off-street surface parking lot for tenant use.

Tufaa started the project in the winter of 2017-18; but halted soon in 2018 because of its general contractor filing for bankruptcy just as the concrete foundation was started. Despite the setback,Tufaa clung to his dream,“I never gave up on the project, but I had to regroup and find a new project manager and construction partner.” He also had a growing school transportation business, Metropolitan Transportation Network (MTN), to operate. 

Patrick McGlynn, McGlynn Partners LLC., is overseeing project development. “My job as the developer is to complete Tashitaa’s vision of creating more attainable housing in an area of the city that really needs more housing,” says McGlynn. “Also, this is a privately financed project – we are showing that this type of project can be done without public financing.” Ebert Construction, from Corcoran MN, is the general contractor on the project. Coulee Bank in St. Paul is supplying project financing. 

It would be a plus if the project inspired more affordable/attainable housing proposals from other developers, says McGlynn, who believes there are more opportunities to pursue in the core cities. 

“The building details are designed to complement and enhance the architecture of the surrounding neighborhood,” says Damaris Hollingsworth, project architect from Design by MELO. The building exterior includes a mix of corrugated metal, brick and wood elements at key locations for visual appeal. Brick complements the mix of brownstone and brick exteriors of a nearby church and residential row houses, while wood finds its match in the wood siding of adjacent single-family houses, says Hollingsworth. 

Tufaa developed MTN into one of the leading private school bus operators in the state. As a real estate investor, Tufaa hopes to make an impact on society by helping produce more attainably priced housing in city neighborhoods. “We are responsible for creating affordable housing for people in our society,” he says. 

The Park & Franklin project brings him back to his early days as an immigrant to the U.S. “I lived in an apartment just four blocks away from the Park and Franklin intersection when I first arrived in Minnesota from Ethiopia,” he says. “I know that part of the city very well, I love it, and I am excited to create more housing for the neighborhood. There’s plenty of luxury apartment and condo buildings in Minneapolis – especially downtown – but hardly any new attainably priced housing that working families can afford.” 

6th ward Councilmember Jamal Osman speaking 
Councilmember Andrea Jenkins speaking 
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Tips from a COVID-19 Case Investigator

 By LINDSEY FENNER

 How to gather together indoors

As we spend more time indoors, it’s important to keep in mind all of the ways we can reduce risk of spreading COVID-19 and still spend time with family and friends. Unfortunately, smaller social gatherings are a very common way that coronavirus spreads. Numbers are rising and the virus is much more widespread across Minnesota and our neighboring states. This means that we are going to have to work together 

to make sure the upcoming winter holiday season doesn’t make things worse. Here are some things to think about when you are planning for the holidays: 

Communicate expectations beforehand: Make sure everyone attending has agreed to take the same precautions like wearing masks indoors, staying home when sick, and limiting activities for a few weeks before and after the gathering. 

Plan ahead for preventative measures: If you’re hosting, make sure to have extra masks, hand sanitizer, and supplies for handwashing. Have furniture already spaced. Get single use utensils or encourage people to bring their own. 

Keep a list: Write down who was at the gathering, just in case someone gets COVID. This will be helpful if you are contacted by the health department. 

Outdoors is better than indoors: How could you adjust traditions to make them outdoor activities? If you are meeting indoors, think about how to avoid crowding and improve ventilation. Is there enough space indoors for everyone to easily socially distance? Can you open some windows or doors to improve ventilation? 

Smaller is better than bigger: Try to limit indoor gatherings to ten or fewer people. The more people attending means the higher the risk, especially if guests are coming from out of town. You should not be attending gatherings if you have been told to isolate or quarantine, have symptoms of COVID-19 or are at high risk of serious illness. 

Be prepared to cancel: If anyone in a household is feeling unwell, that whole household should send their regrets. This goes for the host household too. Did you plan for an outdoor event but the weather didn’t cooperate? It is safer to reschedule. Arrive and realize you’re not comfortable with the precautions being taken? I give you permission to gracefully leave. 

Be thoughtful about food: Many of our upcoming holidays center around food, but sharing a meal indoors is a high-risk activity. This is because we have to take our masks off to eat. The least risky option is to have a virtual shared meal. Another lower risk option is to meet in-person but skip the meal. If you are going to share a meal in-person, eat outside if the weather allows. Set up several tables so that everyone is able to distance while eating. Consider having each household group bring their own food, dishes and utensils, and sit at their own tables. And when you’re done eating, masks go back on. 

Don’t forget the basics: We don’t get to take a holiday from wearing a mask, social distancing (this means no hugs!), handwashing, and staying home if sick or at high risk of serious illness. 

Read more: 

https://www.health.state. mn.us/diseases/coronavirus/ holidays.html 

https://www.cdc.gov/ coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/holidays.html 

Lindsey lives in East Phillips and has been working a reassignment as a COVID-19 Case Investigator for local public health. She never thought she would still be doing this in November 

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Remembering Bob Albee

 Robert Albee 1945 – 2020

 By CARZ NELSON

 

Robert Albee

Bob Albee was a great neighbor. He was a paragon of community involvement; his decades of work in Phillips spanned innumerable issues and organizations. He was generous as a mentor and a role model. He was a champion for social change. His work was fundamental to many neighborhood institutions that will continue well beyond his own life. Bob Albee has died, but his contributions to society will live on. 

the alley Newspaper owes a special debt to him for his work with the newspaper. He was on the Alley Board of Directors from 1996 until late 1999. He was also the creator and first editor of the Ventura Village Neighborhood News feature in the alley

Albee was from Huron, South Dakota. He graduated from the University of South Dakota in 1969 with a MA in the fields of Political Science and History. He helped start the radio station WOJB in the Lac Courte Oreilles Reservation in Wisconsin in 1982. The station continues to bring community radio to the North Country to this day.

In 1991, he became the Assistant Director of the American Indian Community Development Corporation. In this role, he helped to revitalize East Franklin Avenue. He worked on projects like the Many Rivers East and West apartment buildings at 1400 and 1500 East Franklin Avenue.

With his wife Sharon, Bob developed A Partnership Of Diabetics (A-POD), a diabetes education and support program operated by and for people with diabetes initially as one of several other Community Health Action Teams within the Backyard Initiative, a partnership between community residents in seven neighborhoods and Allina Health, facilitated by the Cultural Wellness Center. A-POD eventually formed as its own non-profit organization. Albee received the Bruce Zimmerman Award from the Minnesota Department of Health in 2014 for his work in promoting diabetes self-management and empowering participants in their interactions with health care providers.

Albee served on the boards of numerous nonprofit organizations, including the Green Institute and Phillips Community Energy Co-op. He was an advocate for the Phillips Community Center and the Ventura Village neighborhood.

In 2017, he moved to Lynnwood, Washington to be near family. After a short battle with cancer, Albee died on October 6, 2020. 

When the COVID-19 pandemic is under control, (hopefully this spring,) a celebration of Bob Albee’s life will be held in Minneapolis. 

Bob Albee was passionate about talking with people, embellishing conversations and information through print and radio, and then welcomed and effectively used social media as it has evolved. Bob was the first and creative editor of Ventura Village News published in the alley newspaper beginning six years ago after being an Alley Communications Board member for four years in the late 1990’s. Bob was an amazing, dedicated, and inveterate good neighbor in meetings, yes, but most importantly, in person on the street, in their home, also at their home and backyard as he was always personably reaching out to others. We 

have missed him in the Phillips Community since they moved to the Seattle area, but he left memories and footprints here for us to follow and reminding us as Chief Seattle said, “Take only memories; Leave only footprints.”

– Harvey Winje, the alley Newspaper Editorial Leadership Team 

Bob did a lot of good things in the Native American community in Minneapolis over the decades that he lived there. He also spent a lot of time working in the Phillips neighborhood to improve the lives of people living here. For example, he fought to keep the swimming pool from being cemented in at the Phillips Community Center, believing that inner city kids need a place to learn to swim, and need access to such recreational places. He also ran diabetes meetings there since he suffered from that himself. Personally, for me Bob was a friend and mentor. He was on The Circle board for a long time and he cared deeply about our community and the newspaper. Overall, he led a life of service to other people and he is dearly missed. 

– Cat Whipple, Managing Editor of The Circle. 

Bob was a tireless champion for the Ventura Village and Phillips Neighborhoods and the people in the community. He saw possibilities and wanted to get things done. Almost 20 years ago, shortly after I joined the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board, I was serving as center director at Stewart Park and Bob was kind, supportive and a true collaborator. He served as a bridge between the park and the community and he opened a lot of doors for me, which resulted in great connections and opportunities to develop great programming. Later, he was at the center of the transformation of the Phillips Community Center. He knew the importance of, and the need for, programming and services for those in the neighborhood. He really rallied for building renovations and rebuilding the pool. He was part of a group of passionate neighborhood advocates that worked with park staff to make the Phillips Community Center a great destination for youth and families. Bob will be missed by all who knew him and admired him. – Superintendent Al Bangoura, Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board

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Alley November 2020

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Cultural Wellness Center: Moving from “Race” to “Culture”

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Midtown Phillips Cleanup

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!!! VOTE !!!

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Ventura Village Neighborhood news

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Remaining COVID-free as we move indoors

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