NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Monday April 23rd 2018

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United Fruit Basket Upset of America

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44th MayDay! Theme Decision Time!!

By MEG WALSH

Welcome to two brainstorm community meetings for the 44th MayDay Parade Theme.

MayDay Parade, Ceremony, and Festival process begins in Feb.& Mar. Neighbors and Artists: have a conversation about our community: hopes, concerns, & images that resonate & inspire as we look towards this new year.

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MayDay Green Team

By LUCINDA ANDERSON

MD Green Team needs volunteers for planning team. MayDay 2018 is our 5th year helping reduce waste at this large community event. MayDay presents a fantastic opportunity to learn about planning and doing Public Event waste reduction. You’ll join an awesome group of fellow volunteers to boot.

Volunteers needed on the day of the event too; mark May 6th on your calendars!

Interested, or have questions? Lucinda Anderson at luroympls@yahoo.com. Thanks!

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Letter to the Editor Progress and Vigilance

EDITOR’S NOTE: The Alley Newspaper asked Lindsey Fenner, East Phillips resident, HN County Library worker and AFSME Local 2822 for any updates within the library system since she wrote an article in the FEBRUARY 2018 issue of The Alley. Here is what Linsey offered.]

LINDSEY FENNER

There are plans developing for overdose training (not Narcan administration, but more general) for staff at three of the most impacted libraries (including Franklin). Franklin and two more libraries will be added to the pilot sharps container list.

We have a labor/management meeting the end of February to discuss what training would look like, and hopefully get the answers to the questions we had asked at the last meeting about what the actual policy, procedures, and training are for sharps and bloodborne pathogens for all of the workers in the library. (Apparently there is often a lot of blood in the bathrooms from injection accidents. On their own initiative, frontline library workers have been educating janitorial staff on the importance of wearing gloves and being cautious when changing the trash.”

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Raise Your Voice

By PETER MOLENAAR

CITYPAGES,
2018 People issue:
Kate and Carly have renamed Lake Calhoun. We will no longer honor a defender of human bondage. Say over and over: Bde Maka Ska, be-DAY mah-KAH-skah, be-DAY mah-KAH-skah. We might now begin to comprehend the Dakota spirit, once reflected in the Milky Way of the night sky.

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Backyard Initiative – March 2018

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February 2018 Alley Newspaper

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Bill Parker – Friend to the Indian Community

BY LAURA WATERMAN WITTSTOCK

Opera devotees tuned in to the Opera program one evening every week to hear Bill Parker play and comment on great music as probably no one has since on Minnesota Public Radio. When the traveling portion of the Metropolitan Opera came to Minneapolis, Bill would pull out all the stops to record interviews with visiting performers. He found one baritone who was interested in American Indians and he took him to the American Indian Center for a pow wow.

At the other end of the day, he also hosted the Morning Show with his well-known humor. He also wrote liner notes for records and CDs, and after his book Building A Classical Music Library in 1994 was published, Best Buy put up life-sized cut-out photos of Bill to greet customers. His collection of thousands of tapes and CDs gave him broad access to the classical world.

What is little known is that Bill Parker began volunteering for MIGIZI Communications in late 1978. He came to the Indian community looking for organizations to volunteer for and someone directed him to us. He plowed right in, doing things like carrying sacks of potatoes for a community feast or quietly standing in the back of the room, ready to help. When he found out we would be training college students from the Journalism school at the University of Minnesota in radio skills, Bill said he could teach voice for radio. Once our studios were built and we had a number of students enrolled in our classes, we began taking students from the general public, and the first student we had was David Larsen, who had a pronounced stutter. Bill said he could help him and teach microphone skills as well. Bill did as promised and for the rest of his life, David remembered his training, and he became a sought-after speaker in the Indian community. Another trainee, Ed Sando, came from the circus world where he grappled tents and loaded animals onto the circus railroad cars. He wanted to learn how to narrate live events. Gauging Ed’s gravelly voice from years of smoking cigarettes, Bill thought he had potential. The first assignment Bill gave him was live coverage of an American Indian boxing event. Thrilled with the assignment, Ed succeeded very well. It seemed like Bill was a miracle worker who could understand the voice abilities of his students and enough of their personalities to emphasize their strengths.

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Annie Young, Phillips Elder has died

Statement by Brad Bourn, Mpls. Park and Recreation Board, President, early Jan. 23rd

Annie Young passed away this evening. Annie was the second longest serving Commissioner in the history of the Mpls. Park Board.

I’ve directed Park Board Flag to be at half-staff until Jan. 31st. Like many, I’m still processing this loss. I had the honor of serving with Annie for eight years. She was an early champion of so many of the values I base my work on today and had a leadership style that I try to emulate.

Annie has made our city better in countless ways. All of Mpls. owes her a debt of gratitude.

The MPBR will release an official statement soon and will work with Young’s family to respect their wishes in recognizing the incredible contributions she has made to our parks.

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The Opioid Epidemic in Our Libraries: Hennepin County Needs to Do Better

LINDSEY FENNER

On Wednesday, January 17, 2018 a Franklin Library patron died at HCMC, after overdosing in the library restroom. Another patron overdosed the following morning in a Franklin Library restroom. Although this is absolutely heartbreaking, I know as a Hennepin County Library worker it has become far too common for library patrons to overdose in Hennepin County libraries or on library property. As the opioid epidemic has exploded, as we know too well in the Phillips neighborhoods, public restrooms have become regular sites for drug injection.

Unfortunately, Library Administration has failed to adequately provide for the safety of workers and patrons in Hennepin County Public Libraries. This is not to diminish the wonderful work that public library workers do. But public libraries, as some of the few remaining public spaces, often fill in the gaps that insufficient public services create. Libraries frequently act as de facto day centers and, in some cases, de facto injection sites. Library workers (including County Security, and contracted security and custodial workers) have few or no tools to safely deal with this reality.

For example, Hennepin County Libraries have very few SHARPS containers, either for public or staff disposal. AFSCME Local 2822, representing circulation staff in Hennepin County Libraries, has asked for SHARPS containers in public libraries for months, but the reluctantly promised pilot program (in two buildings out of 41), has been slow to materialize. At a December meeting with union representatives, Library Administration was unable to provide satisfactory information on the availability of SHARPS containers in libraries, proper SHARPS disposal procedures, training, or safety for Hennepin County Security and Library staff or for contracted security and custodial staff. In fact, union representatives were questioned as to why they would care about the safety of workers who were not in their union.

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