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Social history set in stone

Tales fromPioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery

By Sue Hunter Weir

164th in a Series

Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery

In June 2002, Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery was listed in the National Register of Historic Places. For 10 years or so it was the only cemetery in Minnesota designated as an individual landmark. The cemetery’s built environment – the fence, caretaker’s cottage and flagpole – made it eligible but so did the lives of the people who are buried there.   

Their stories are a significant part of the city’s social history. It is by no means the complete history of the city during its early years but tells the story of many thousands of the city’s early residents including thousands of immigrants and their children.

In 1904, Sarah and Knut Nordeman, mother and son, entered into a suicide pact and overdosed on morphine. Knut survived but Sarah did not, and was buried in Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery.  Instead of a suicide note, the Nordemans left a signed a six-point explanation of their thinking that included some of their grievances.   One point in particular led to some soul-searching on the part of one of the city’s major newspapers. The Nordemans, Swedish immigrants, believed that they had been discriminated against because of their “foreignness,” and that was what had prevented Knut from finding work that would enable him to support his mother.

This prompted the Minneapolis Tribune to run a story titled “Sought New Names:  Foreign Names Confusing; Jawbreakers Have Been Simplified and Names of Embarrassing Associations Changed.” According to the story, the greatest number of people going to court to change their names were Scandinavians “…who got into trouble through the confusion of names which so frequently arises among that people.” The reasons that people gave for changing their names varied.  Some changed their names in order to blend in by using a name that sounded more “American.”  Others changed their names in order to stand out, to not be confused with others with the same or similar names.  

Some confusion undoubtedly arose because so many people shared the same or similar last names. There are almost 1,000 Johnsons buried in the cemetery and that’s not counting all of the variations (Johanson, Jonasson, Johnston, etc.).  One of the city’s early coroners, obviously unused to Norwegian accents, recorded a Norwegian woman’s name as Wilmaney Sealotte Yonson, most likely his interpretation of Wilhemina Charlotte Johnson. And, there are slightly more than 800 Andersons, even more when you add in variable spellings.  Those two names and their variations account for slightly less than 10% of the cemetery’s burials. 

First names may not yield as much information about immigration as last names but they provide an interesting social history of names as they have gone in and out of fashion.  Some names – Anna, Christine, John and William – are names that were popular in 1900 and remain popular today. Other names have fallen out of fashion:  we have a Zebedee, a Melethia, a Philander and a Sylbush. We have two Weatlhys, three Ulysses, 42 Myrtles and 49 Augustas.  We don’t have any Brittanys, Megans, Jasons or Troys. 

The most common first name really wasn’t really a name at all.  There are 4,123 infants with no recorded first names of their own – Babe Anderson, Babe Johnson, and so forth – who account for almost 19% of the cemetery’s 22,000 burials. Imagine.

Immigrants from Eastern European countries often changed their names to accommodate others who found their names unpronounceable. Jurag Hmelovsky from Slovakia became George Melowsky in America, a name that he used until he died. The correct spelling of his name is etched in granite on his headstone.  

When it came to having a name with embarrassing associations Harry H. Hayward probably had a harder time of it that most.  He shared first and last names with one of the state’s most notorious criminals – Harry T. Hayward.  The fact that Harry H. had a different middle initial than Harry T. probably didn’t prevent him from being mistaken for the mastermind of Minnesota’s crime of the 19th century (who is buried in the cemetery).  Harry H. remained in Minneapolis for four years after Harry T.’s trial but ultimately changed his last name to Smith and moved to Chicago. 

The city’s social history is a fascinating one and is one that can be found, at least in part, in the cemetery’s records.  When the cemetery reopens in the spring stop in, and explore a part of the city’s story.  

Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery

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WANTED: INFORMATION ON 628 East Franklin Ave.

How many years has this building been empty? How many profit or non-profit developers have tried to renovate and occupy? Why hasn’t any one of them successful when housing is needed and so many new buildings are being built? Please let us know at copydesk@alleynews.org, P.O. Box 7006 Mpls., MN 55407 or 612-990-4022.

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Briefs March 2019

Youth leaders in D.C.
MIGIZI  sent 12 youth leaders from  Edison, South High, Fridley, Farmington, White Bear Lake, and Augsburg Fairview Academy schools to Washington D.C. to join the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) American Indian Youth Legislative Summit on Feb. 10, 2019. This experience for youth is part of the recent Administration for American Indians I-LEAD grant awarded in October of 2018. In DC, they networked with current Tribal and United  States elected leaders on Capitol Hill to discuss pressing issues and further their understanding of Tribal sovereignty and government relations. They had a blast exploring the National Mall and the local DC scene.

‘Vessel’ reception at Norway House

Norway House invites the community to kick off the 2019 gallery season with “Vessel” on Friday, March 1 from 5 to 8 p.m. (913 East Franklin Ave.)

“Vessel” features two contemporary Danish ceramic artists, Michael Geertsen and Morten Løbner Espersen in tandem with Minnesota woodcarver, Mike Loeffler, as they explore traditional craft with a contemporary twist. Enjoy food and drink at the Kaffebar. Doors open at 5 p.m. and there will be a short program featuring artist Mike Loeffler at 6:30 p.m. “Vessel” is on display from Jan. 25 to March 10.

Cuban Film Festival planned

It’s now been four years since the beginning of relaxation of relations between the United States and Cuba. However, some policies have been significantly reversed under President Trump, and the U.S. economic blockade continues unabated. Until it ends, the annual Cuban Film Festival in Minneapolis will have two goals: to offer Minnesotans a chance to learn about and appreciate Cuban film and culture and to remind our supporters of the onerous burden that the blockade inflicts on the Cuban people. 

The festival is scheduled for six consecutive Thursdays, Feb. 21 to March 28, in partnership with MSP Film Society and with ICAIC (Instituto Cubano de Arte e Industria Cinematográficos), the Cuban Film Institute. In addition, the festival will celebrate two important anniversaries, 60 years of the Cuban Revolution and 60 years of ICAIC.

The lineup of films includes: “The Forbidden Shore” by Ron Chapman, “Los Buenos Demonios (The Good Demons)” by Gerardo Chijona, “Cuban Women in Revolution” by Maria Torrellas, “Sergio and Sergei” by Ernesto Daranas, “El Regreso (The Return)” by Blanca Rosa Blanco, and “Ghost Town to Havana” by Eugene Corr and Roberto Chile. Screenings will take place at 7 p.m. each Thursday at MSP Film Society at St. Anthony Main Theatre, 115 SE Main St.   

 On Thursday, March 21, Blanca Rosa Blanco, a long-time star of Cuban film and television, will be present at the screening of El Regreso, her directorial debut.

 A discussion will follow the first five films and planning for a closing night party is in the works.

Tickets are $8 general admission and $6 for students, seniors and MSP Film Society members and can be bought at the box office or online at mspfilm.org. Trailers and further information are available at  mspfilm.org/10th-annual-cuban-film-festival and at www.minnesotacubacommittee.org.

Mail delivery delayed

Mail delivery has run into some hiccups across South Minneapolis, due to a shortage of postal carriers and snow- and ice-related injuries that have temporarily sidelined more than two dozen carriers. Because the Postal Service is a federal agency, the city has been in touch with the offices of U.S. Rep. Ilhan Omar and U.S. Sens. Amy Klobuchar and Tina Smith, as well is working the city’s postmaster. This situation also underscores the importance of clearing sidewalks and walkways of snow and ice. 

MIGIZI welcomes new staff 

Jane Zamora is the new Academic Support Specialist at MIGIZI Communications. Her given name is Zoongizi Ikwe (Strong Women). She is an enrolled member of Red Lake Nation, and was born and raised in Minneapolis. Her mother was born and raised in Red Lake; and her father was Mexican and grew up in Montana. 

“I started my career in 1988 working with Native youth in Minneapolis which lead me to work for Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS) Indian Education, St. Joseph Home for Children, PACER Center, Supervisor of the Crow Head Start Program, and Anoka-Hennepin School District Indian Education,” she said. “Some of my other accomplishments include serving as the President of JOM for MPS, the Richard Green Advisory Council for MPS, Parent Participatory Evaluation team for MPS, and a board member of MIEA (Minnesota Indian Education Association). 

“My passion is to show our Indigenous youth that success is possible and to continue to strive, no matter how sharp those curves can get for them.”

Neighborhoods 2020

Submit your feedback on the Neighborhoods 2020 framework recommendations for the future of neighborhood organizations. The recommendations cover programming, funding, and governance for these groups starting in 2020 and beyond. The city is gathering comments from community members through March 31. 

Recommendations are designed to support key goals, including ensuring organizations reflect the communities they serve, simplified participation for all, and fiscal responsibility. The proposed measures include developing an outreach plan, accessing competitive funding based alignment with city-identified priorities, and promoting smart spending, among many others. Submit feedback via email to neighborhoods2020@minneapolismn.gov.

Recycling changes

No. 6 plastics and any black plastic are no longer accepted for recycling in Minneapolis. No. 6 plastics are already prohibited for food service uses by Minneapolis’ Green to Go ordinance, and black plastic containers are difficult to sort and can cause contamination in the recycling process. 

Changes in the international, national and local recycling markets have made it more important than ever to place only the accepted items in recycling carts. Some of items commonly found in recycling carts that are not accepted include:

• Paper coffee cups, plates and takeout containers – note that these may be able to be put in your organics recycling cart if labeled properly

• Plastic bags, bubble wrap and plastic film

• Large plastic items

• Metal pots, pans and scrap

• Paper egg cartons, napkins and paper towels – note that these may be put in the organics recycling cart.

A quarter of Minneapolis’ garbage could be composted. Call Solid Waste & Recycling at 612-673-2917 for more information.

Ecological plan

The first ever draft Minneapolis Parks Ecological System Plan has opened for 45-day comment period and will close on April 1. The plan sets a vision for making more environmentally friendly parks and public land in Minneapolis so that the city can be cleaner, greener, cooler and more efficient. 

First E. African specialist

Numan Shaikh is the Minneapolis Neighborhood and Community Relations department’s full time East African Community Specialist. Numan initially joined NCR in a temporary capacity, and will now replace Abdirashid Ahmed, who moved on from his role in November of 2018.

Solar Egg opens

Reflect: Bigert & Bergström is a new, limited-time American Swedish Institute experiential exhibition showcasing Solar Egg, a social sculpture and a working sauna. See it in the ASI outdoor Courtyard March 6 to April 28, (2600 Park Ave.  To schedule sauna sessions visit ASImn.org.

Puppet Works opens at HOBT March 15

Tara Fahey, Akiko, Kallie Melvin, and Andrew Young will premiere four original puppet works at In the Heart of the Beast Puppet and Mask Theatre (HOBT) this March, as part of HOBT’s artist incubator program, Puppet Lab. This year’s performances explore themes of identity, ancestry, and legacy, through the lens of the artist’s personal journeys. 

“These remarkable artists have been working hard since August and now they are ready for you the audience. I have been honored to support these four visionary artists,” says HOBT Director of Performance Programs, Alison Heimstead. 

This will be Puppet Lab’s eight year of supporting radical, genre-expanding performances. The Puppet Lab program is directed by Alison Heimstead and is made possible by generous support from the Jerome Foundation. More at www.hobt.org.

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Ventura Village Neighborhood News March 2019

Ventura

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Midtown Phillips Neighborhood Association March 2019

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EPIC report March 2019

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Cartoon March 2019

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The Rand Report: Sex workers on Lake St.

By Rand Retterath

Rand Retterrath

Part 1 of a series.

For the past six or seven years, many of us have been documenting the rise in prostitution along Lake St. and Bloomington, long known as the sex destination for Minneapolis, as Selby Dale is for St. Paul. Apart from the spectacular increase and the universal agreement that it had been years since we had witnessed such an influx, people were universally upset with the fact that it seemed as though we were chasing our tail.  The ebb and flow of sex trafficking is constant.

At about the same time, I listened to an elected official report on sex trafficking of children for which the city had paid a couple thousand dollars and was left wondering what, if anything, I had learned that I could not have gleaned from an episode of Law and Order.

At another unrelated venue I was able to listen to two transgender sex workers talk about their desire for sex work. One indicated she did it because she could, and the other said that she felt safe on the streets.

Finally, while running one day, I came across a young girl waiting for MTC while a creepy man scoped her out. She was unsafe. I stood there until her bus came. It then occurred to me that I typically saw eight school buses picking up our children on 29th between Cedar and 11th in the midst of the sex trade.  

I routinely noticed a large convocation of sex workers on 16th and Lake right next to a child care center. I also documented an incredible number of students from Hiawatha Academy picking up the bus at Bloomington and Lake, arguably ground zero for the sex and drug trade along Lake Street.

I noticed statistical anomalies in the clustering and wondered why. With the exception of Bloomington and Lake, the high-density activity seems to occur around the property of a single owner/landlord (currently cluster in or near Clinton, 5th, Portland, Bloomington and 17th ).

On a recent run, at 5:30 a.m., I encountered three sex workers at Bloomington and Lake, a John or pimp at 15th and Lake, another sex worker at 15th and Lake, a transgender sex worker on Columbus and Lake followed by her pimp.  The pimp was wearing a jacket similar to, if not the exact one, of drug sellers at the Minnehaha Transit station.  

There was another sex worker across the street at Columbus.  At the Portland bus shelter was another trans sex worker, a cis female sex worker and their pimp.  At 5th and Lake there were 2 more sex workers.  Finally at Clinton I came across a suspicious vehicle.

Remember, this was all on one run.

Over the years, I have spoken to these men and women.  I have found a Lesbian pimping her girlfriend and at least four gay men working on Lake Street. I have found rent boys in same locations and documented occasions where up to 35% of the known sex-workers at a given time were trans.

All of this got me thinking.  We have argued that the sex industry is gender-based, with men oppressing women and forcing them in to this. While that remains statistically relevant, it does not explain the trans, gay and lesbian involvement.  

It also upset me that this gender-based argument translates to sentencing.  Johns are given gross misdemeanors and sex workers a misdemeanor. That begged another question for me, who has the greater negative impact on my community ?The gender-based political argument would have the demand supply of the equation at fault. However, the supply side participants are the ones living here and among us. They are also the ones with the needles and other maladaptive behavior. I have seen them beaten and beating.

I sought to understand. We are getting nowhere with the political gender imbalance argument. It continues to ebb and flow and the community is the ultimate victim.

Among the many books I read to educate myself include:

1. Jonathan Kozol “Savage Inequalities, Children in American Schools” where I concluded that schools MUST be part of the solution. Children, as they mature, independently form social and community bonds with each other. Formerly, through sporting and organized extra-curricular l activities, schools provided guidance and direction in the formation of socially acceptable norms for these kids. In their absence, maladaptive norms form. This is how the trans woman mentioned above came to feel “safe” on the streets.  She had been indoctrinated into the street life. Then same is said for gangs.

2. Judith Butler “Gender Trouble” where I learned that normal and traditional feminism is wrong to look at natural, essential notion of female or even sex or gender.  Gender is a social performance rather than expression of prior reality. This allowed me to consider the alternate non-cis females as part of the discussion and how the rainbow of participants is important to consider in ANY solution.

3. Julia O’Connell Davidson, “Prostitution, Power and Freedom.” Davidson’s research involves nine countries across the spectrum of sex tourism, adult and child prostitution, procurers and clients.  Her conclusion is that prostitution is hugely complex and not just an effect of men oppressing women through violence and intimidation. She also introduced me to the concept of sex-tourism and I came to understand that Lake St, like other locations is a Twin Cities Sex Tourism destination. EVERYONE knows about Lake Street and Selby-Dale as sex destinations. It has been that way for decades.

4. Barbara Gibson, “Male Order, Life Stories From Boys Who Sell Sex.” From this author I gleaned how a boys childhood can relate to their life on the streets, affirming Jonathan Kozol and placing the phenomena of female sex trade again on par with that of male. They experienced all the same issues and concerns women do, from violence to addiction, to HIV, brokers and pimps etc.

5. Editors Scott Cunningham and Manisha Shah “The Oxford Handbook of the Economics of Sex, Oxford University.” Most of the economic analysis was over my head; however, it did beg the question of a new approach to the phenomenon.  Social and political approaches haven’t work, and are subjective rather than objective. This puts the law in the position of choosing who is and is not a victim based on gender rather than behavior and set the stage for the really pivotal paper to follow. It also muddies the discussion by making it emotional rather than factual.

6. Glen Chandler, “The Sins of Jack Saul, the True Story of Dublin Jack and the Cleveland Street Scandal.” One man, one all-male brothel, 1880s forward and a chronicle of how he faced all the same issues any sex worker of any period has faced making the issue not one of gender but of profession. 

7. Finally and most importantly Seven D. Levitt (University of Chicago Economist) and Sudhir Alladi Venkatesh (Professor of Sociology Columbia University) “An Empirical Analysis of Street-Level Prostitution.” By combining transaction-level data on street prostitutes with ethnographic observation and official police force data, they analyzed the economics of prostitution in Chicago.  

Rand is 30 year resident of Phillips, homeowner, past block club leader and veteran of many city initiatives and committees who believes we must ALL hold people in power responsible and seek to build community.  Neighborhood engagement, economic development and personal growth/responsibility are the cornerstones of community.

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Raise Your Voice: Blessed community

Peter Molenaar

By PETER MOLENAAR

Feb. 11, 2019…

I would brave the slippery streets, with the ongoing sixth mass species extinction in mind, in order to participate in the public visioning phase of the HOTB Mayday Parade. This was to be the last opportunity to make a modest appearance.

The chairs of the Avalon meeting room were well occupied to receive Sandy Spieler’s guidance. As it turned out, Sandy had been entitled to choose this year’s theme, and rightfully so. In keeping with Martin Luther King’s intent, she chose: “Blessed Community.”

To develop this theme, the gathering was tasked to a rotating series of workshops, set in the auditorium. My first stop was captioned: “Barriers to a Blessed community.” The tally of square sticker tag commentary was to reveal an old question of causality: Is the human condition a consequence of “human nature,” or is human nature a reflection of social systems?

An appropriate MLK quote: “This country has socialism for the rich, and rugged individualism for the poor.” Hmmm…

For example, consider the historic cost of U.S. interventions in support of brutal Central American regimes – regimes now corrupted by drug cartels and street gangs who will rape your mother lest she flee – flee to the border, only to have her baby stolen and placed in a cage. Imperialism costs a lot.

Moving on to the next workshop….

The question: What influence do the elements of the ground below and sky above, the river and trees, have upon the Blessed Community? Regarding trees, with sticker tags in hand, I wrote: Material formation responding to external stimuli, in order to sustain and replicate itself. Yes, the biological definition of life reads like a poem.

Somehow I am reminded here of a white-angel-face MAGA teen who saw fit to taunt a Native elder. Oh, so we have young “right to lifers” who worship a man who deemed arms sales to “Saudi friends” as good business, even as the images of dead and dying Yemeni children were before us. Such is the nature of the “Trump effect.”

Yet, we do have a blessed community. We have entered the room of Ilhan Omar, whose spirit of opposition to all forms of oppression is evident. Note: Certainly at this juncture, regarding the ongoing dispossession and oppression of Palestinians, there can be no Israeli exceptionalism. Period.

And so then…

The HOTB gathering reconvened to hear each voice. In essence, the Marxist in the room stated: For some 200,000 years, empathy and altruism prevailed because the matriarchal circle which formed around the fire prevailed. Let us keep the faith.

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Letter to the Editor: Stop demonizing Ilhan and let it be a lesson learned

by Dean Zimmerman

South Africa had a policy of Apartheid. Lots of people boycotted, marched and protested what was going on in South Africa. South African Officials were chosen in a democracy – well, a democracy for whites, not Colored, Blacks or Indians. Nobody ever said you are anti-South African for protesting this. 

Mississippi had a policy of Jim Crow. Lots of people boycotted, marched and protested what was going on in Mississippi. Mississippi officials were chosen in a democracy – well a democracy for whites, not Blacks. Nobody ever said you are anti-Mississippian for protesting this.  

Israel is a country which embraces, for lack of a better word, apartheid; it is even complete with a wall. But to point this out, to boycott or protest is somehow anti-Semitic. 

America is so racist that to protest racism, such as not standing for the National Anthem, is equated with protesting against America itself. And it seems, that to protest against apartheid in Israel is now equated with being anti-Israel or anti-Jewish. I hear people criticize folks for having a blind eye to Ilhan Omar’s anti-Semitism; ironic how these are the same people who have a blind eye to the apartheid in Israel.

Yes,  anti-Semitism is alive and well in the USA. and getting uglier every day, along with your run of the mill racism. 

I believe Ilhan Omar’s use of the word Hypnotism was unfortunate and totally innocent. Not everyone is aware that the Nazis promoted an older idea that Jews, somehow, had some magical power to hypnotize people. A better word would have been “duped”.  She now knows something that she did not know before.  I like that in a congressperson.

Not everyone knows every hidden meaning and nuisance of every phrase in the English language. A couple of examples:

• Not everyone knows that the term “paddywagon” has to do with hauling away the drunken Irishmen.

• Recently, a 60 year old woman with a long history of progressive activism and who is a convert to Judaism said to me, “That was very white of you.” Hmmm,” she said,  “that is a funny expression, I wonder where it comes from.”  She really had no idea that it was a racist phrase, and was surprised about its origin when I pointed it out to her.

• When I was working in the backcountry of Mississippi in the 1960s, I used the phrase “by the way.” A very devout Christian woman asked me to stop taking the name of God in vain.  What???  In this woman’s thinking, because Jesus said, “I am the way….”, therefore the word “way” was synonymous with “God”. Wow, I did not see that one coming. Did that make me anti-Christian?

I have seen in any number of posts on Facebook, words to the effect: “Ilhan Omar knew that she was using anti-sematic language.”   We cannot really know what others know. Really, we can’t.

Let us lighten up and help one another to grow and to confront our own racism and the institutional racism that surrounds us, and stop demonizing our friends and neighbors. Everything I now know, I once did not know, I’m assuming that is true for everyone, except the self-righteous of course. 

Dean Zimmerman is a former member of the Minneapolis City Council.

Editor’s note: Readers are cautioned that quotes taken out of the context of whole conversations can be misleading, so further reading of whole encounters is recommended.   Following her initial statement on Twitter, Minnesota Congresswoman Ilhan Omar said her intention was never to offend “my constituents or Jewish Americans as a whole. . . . This is why I unequivocally apologize. At the same time, I reaffirm the problematic role of lobbyists in our politics, whether it be AIPAC, the NRA or the fossil fuel industry. It’s gone on too long and we must be willing to address it.”

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