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Sunday June 16th 2019

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Obituaries from the 1860s: Gone to glory before us

Lorenzo Prescott’s marker was replaced last year.

Obituaries can be a source of valuable information for people wanting to know about family members or other people they’re interested in, but not all obituaries provide the same information or even close to it.  

The style and substance of obituaries has changed over time.  During the late 1800s up until about the middle of the 20th century, obituaries functioned as death announcements and mostly offered details about funeral and burial arrangements but little else. More recent obituaries tend to focus on achievements and accomplishments and connections to family and friends, sometimes in the newspaper, but increasingly in social media.

In the 1860s, obituaries often told more about someone’s character or beliefs. Sarah Dickey died in childbirth on Dec. 4, 1868, at the age of 41. She and her husband came to St. Anthony around 1865.  He worked as a wheelwright. Her obituary ran on the front page of the Minneapolis Tribune on Dec. 9, 1868:

Only the base of Sarah Dickey’s marker is left over 150 years later.

DIED – In Minneapolis, December 4th, Mrs. Sarah R. Dickey, wife of Mr. William Dickey.

The deceased, during a residence of somewhat more than a year, had greatly endeared herself to the friends and acquaintances she had formed.  Her manners were affable and winning; her conversation indicated culture; her tastes were refined and elevated; her mind was active and fond of the investigation of truth; her religious sensibilities were quick, and conversation upon religious themes was to her a source of evident delight. The loss to her family, to her circle of friends, and to the church with which she worshiped is great. The experience of extreme suffering had made her covet the “rest for the weary.”

Some obituaries, especially those written for children, included poetry. Toussaint L’Ouverture Grey was born on April 11, 1859, and is said to have been the first African-American child born in St. Anthony. His parents were political activists, and his father was described as the “first resident barber in St. Anthony.”Toussaint’s obituary ran on the front page of the Minneapolis Tribune on July 2, 1868:

DIED – In this city, June 28th, of heart disease, Toussaint L’Overture Grey, second son of R. T. and E. O. Grey, aged 9 years, 2 months and 17 days.

A devoted son and loving brother, his death will leave a void in the family circle, never to be filled.  A good child, loving his Sabbath school and his God, he was willing to die, and asked his family to meet him in Heaven.  He leaves a large circle of friends to sympathize with his parents over his early death.

He has gone to glory before us

He turns and waves his hand

Pointing to glory over us,

In that bright and happy land.

Toussaint’s marker was made of harder stone.

The Minneapolis Tribune’s announcement of Lawrence (Lorenzo)Taliaferro Prescott’s death is sparse considering the fact that he was the son of one of Minnesota’s best-known territorial pioneers. He was the son of Philander Prescott, one of the casualties of the 1862 Dakota Conflict, and Mary (Spirit of the Moon) Prescott, the daughter of a Dakota tribal elder. Lorenzo served with the first Minnesota Heavy Artillery during the Civil War until he received an honorable discharge for a medical disability. While serving on the East Coast, he contracted malaria and his death is thought to have been caused, at least in part, by an overdose of quinine, the preferred treatment for malaria at the time.  Lorenzo returned to Minnesota and married Marion Robertson Hunter, the granddaughter of Grey Cloud. He worked as an interpreter in one of the relocation camps in Nebraska, but returned to his sister’s home in Shakopee when his health failed. The following announcement appeared in the Minneapolis Tribune on Jan. 6, 1869, three days after he died from ulcers.  He was 30 years old.

“Mr. Prescott was well educated, a young man of good character and habits and until quite recently was employed as interpreter, at the Indian agency near Omaha.  Failing health necessitated his resignation of that position, and he returned home to die.”

Lorenzo Prescott is buried near his parents on what the Tribune described as “the old homestead, near Minnehaha.” That appears not to have been the case since his parents had been buried in the family’s plot at Layman’s cemetery almost two years earlier.

Despite the occasional error or misunderstanding, obituaries are a valuable source of information and have preserved some sense of what people were like.  Not just how and when they died, but how they lived.

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Phillips West April 2019

By CRYSTAL WINDSCHITL

Check out the Phillips West Website: www.phillipswest.info

Community meeting

April 4 (Thursday) 6-7pm
Join your neighbors and other Community Partners for updates from local city government, 3rd Precinct Police.  We will also have Met Transit Present to give an update on the new D-Line Construction and their upcoming outreach efforts. Meeting will take place at the Center for Changing Lives in the Centrum Room (2400 Park Avenue). Free parking is available in the rear of building off Oakland Ave. Free delivery pizza and beverages will be provided!  Contact Crystal at 612-879-5383 or email her at pwno2005@yahoo.com

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Ventura Village April 2019

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EPIC April 2019

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Midtown Phillips Neighborhood Association April 2019

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New coffee shop opens


HARVEY WINJE

QARIBUNI COFFEE  has opened!  Daily 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. across 15th Ave. from Avalon/HOBT. Windows in photo open fully-warm days, a fireplace for cooler and a hallway connects to the QURUXLOW Restaurant completing a 14th-15th Ave. evolution from previous stores, Peterson-Chrysler/Plymouth, Kawasaki Motorcycle, a gas station, and Kaplan Bros. Clothing,  including a dust-free concrete parking lot.

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In brief

Procession for peace April 14

Pr. Patrick Cabello Hansel
Procession of Peace on Palm Sunday led by St. Paul’s Lutheran Church.

Each year, St. Paul’s Lutheran Church and its Semilla Center for Healing and the Arts sponsors a Procession of Peace on Palm Sunday.  Attendees walk through the neighborhood, stopping to lift up concerns of the community, such as safety, the environment, youth, immigration and poverty.  “Especially this year, with all the division in our society, we are committed to walking a different way: one of welcome and justice,” say organizers.

All are invited to this year’s walk on Sunday, April 14, noon, St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 2742 15th Ave S. For more information, call 612-724-3862 or e-mail stpaulscreate@gmail.com.

Save the date for these events:

• Thursday, May 9: 5-8 p.m.: Semilla and St. Paul’s Night at Midtown Global Market: Poetry by youth and adults, a youth photography show, music and more.

• Saturday, May 18: 9 a.m. to noon: “Pollinate Phillips”. Pant pollinator attracting plants and art in boulevard gardens in the community.

 

Volunteer for MayDay 

On the first Sunday of May, tens of thousands of folks will celebrate a day of community and festivity together. All this takes place because – and only because – hundreds of volunteers pitch in to make it happen.

Register to be a 2019 MayDay volunteer. Heart of the Beast offers group volunteer opportunities for churches, civic organizations, and businesses. Contact Volunteer Coordinator at volunteer@hobt.org for details.

It is time to start collecting bags, brown paper, newspaper, tubs, plastic bags for use during the build workshops. Bring these supplies to upcoming workshops starting April 6. 

 

Music for Climate Justice 

On Saturday, April 6, Tom Neilson brings his satire and social commentary to a Climate Justice Fundraiser co-sponsored by MN350 and MNIPL to stop the construction of Line 3, a proposed tar sands oil pipeline that would cross the Mississippi headwaters as well as Ojibwe treaty territory and have a climate change impact equal to 50 coal plants. 

Neilson is a storyteller who weaves an autobiographical sketch from his dairy farm roots to the Vietnam War, civil rights, liberation struggles in Central America and East Africa, border crossings, pipelines, guns, breastfeeding, parenting, sexuality, reproduction, humanism, lost loves and more… 

His work has resulted in his winning several music awards that includes two Song of the Year Awards from Independent Musicians, and a 2015 nomination for the United Nations Nelson Mandela Award for lifetime achievement in peace and justice. In 2017, he received the Arab American Women Association Award for Global Education Through Performance Art. Michael Stock of WLRN, Miami, FL says, “Tom does a great job of reminding people of what is really important, and the power of folk music to say it.” 

Neilson will tell you he is just a farm boy with a guitar who likes a good ball game and human rights.  The 7 p.m. concert is at the Spring House Ministry at 610 West 28th St., Minneapolis. There is a suggested donation of $10 – 30. For more information, contact Bonnie Beckel 612-722-6473. 

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People & Pets: free shelf for pets

Courtesy of DWIGHT HOBBES

Hard times call for inventive measures, sometimes so simple you wonder why you didn’t think of it. For instance, People & Pets Together (www.peopleandpetstogether.org), a monthly free shelf helping pet owners make ends meet. There’s also a veterinary assistance program as well as other offerings to look after pet health.

Minnesota’s only such operation, it provides, along with enough food to last 30 days, such supplies as carriers, litter, bowls and toys. Principally serving South Minneapolis, no one is turned away.  If you live outside the area, you can still make a one-time visit.  

The idea is to do what they can to help families fend for their little, four-legged (or winged) loved ones.  

“We know pets are family”, says the People & Pets Together brochure. “We help families stay together. Pets help people live happier, healthier lives. By supporting the relationships people have with their pets [we hope] to improve the health of our communities.”

Altruism is no shield against today’s economy.

Accordingly, People & Pets Together have lost their lease and must move by next year.  Meanwhile, the door stays open and tax deductible donations are welcome.  Contact info@peopleandpetstogether.org or People & Pets Together, 3750 Bloomington Ave., Minneapolis, MN 55407

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‘Kids can’t wait’ says Phillips childcare owner Nasro Abshir

Local business owner Nasro Abshir of Family First Choice Childcare (2617 Bloomington Ave. S.) went to the Minnesota Capitol on Feb. 14, 2019 to lead a conversation with the Kids Can’t Wait Coalition and Kids Count On Us.

“We are so lucky to have Lt Governor and Governor who are prioritizing kids and families,” said Abshir. “We heard amazing stories from providers and parents directly impacted by the childcare crisis. We heard how much of a positive impact the Childcare Assistance Program has had on kids and families. We also heard about the devastating impact losing CCAP [and] being on the waitlist can have.”

She is grateful to Governor Tim Walz and Lt. Governor Peggy Flanagan for their leadership and commitment to kids and families.

Abshir has been in the childcare world most of her life, whether it was attending childcare as a child while her mom worked 2-3 different jobs or when she started her first babysitting business at 12 years old. 

“Now, as a provider serving lower-income families it’s a struggle,” said Abshir. “It’s a struggle because we are a highly regulated industry. It’s hard to find qualified committed staff. We are overworked and underpaid in an industry that is not valued because its considered ‘women’s work.’  

“I believe that early education is a basic human right. 

“We have the second highest education gap in the country and that’s because our children begin kindergarten so far behind that they never catch up. That’s why I go to the Capital. 

“I am fighting for my kids and what they deserve. The kids at my center get to experience new opportunities like going to sports events, theatres, museums, and even police and fire stations. These might seem like simple ordinary things but to my kids, they are mind blown. They are surrounded by kids and staff that look like themselves and creates a sense of being home. Being able to have memories and experiences does wonder for a child’s self-esteem.”

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Local pastor to receive BridgeBuilder Award

Christopher Bopp
Pastor Ramirez demonstrates traditional music from his native Mexico.

Pastor Joel Ramirez, long-time Phillips area pastor with ICCM (Inner City Church of Minneapolis), will receive the 2019 BridgeBuilder Award at Global Worship 12. 

Global Worship is a colorful, exciting worship concert Saturday April 13, 6 p.m. at St. Paul’s Church, 1901 Portland. The evening will include performances from the Kehilat Sar Shalom Dancers, Quechua Church, Family Worship Center, and Heart & Soul Drum Academy, among others.

Pastor Ramirez has planted 15 churches in Mexico and the United States, and is involved in training pastors and church leaders. Through his work with CRU, a ministry that equips local churches to be sensitive to the needs of the poor and marginalized, he serves as a mentor and teacher.

St. Paul’s Church, serving the community since 1872, was founded by immigrants and has never forgotten its immigrant roots. It is the home of MissionShift Institute, which offers training in cross-cultural ministry.

St. Paul’s welcomes its new pastor, Rev. Russell Grigsby, who lives here and is excited to serve the Phillips community.

For more information, call 612-874-0133 or see www.StPaulsChurch.info

Christopher Bopp
Many flags represent the nations of the Global Worship community.

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