NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Thursday October 19th 2017

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Public transit availability and public versus private ownership

BY JOHN CHARLES WILSON

Transit news in Phillips and in the Twin Cities is pretty slow this month, so I thought I’d congratulate our neighbors to the south in Rochester on finally having Sunday bus service for the first time in 50 years.

Those of us who are transit dependent in big cities often take for granted that service will be there 20 hours a day, every day. Smaller cities aren’t like that. I lived in Rochester twice, 1988-9 and 2005-6. Needing transit there is like having a 10 PM curfew on weekdays, 6 PM on Saturday, and being grounded every Sunday and holiday, even if you’re a legal adult who did nothing wrong.

Until five years ago, Rochester was the last city in Minnesota, and one of the last in the United States, to have a privately owned bus system. Most public transit in this country has been run by local governments since the 1970s. Rochester’s extremely conservative past is probably part of the reason. When I lived there, it was so right-wing that groups like the Posse Comitatus were almost mainstream and George H. W. Bush was considered a flaming liberal. Fortunately, Rochester is no longer so far to the right. There is even a thriving DFL and an open gay community in what is now nicknamed “Med City”.

Recently, I met George Holter, the founder of Rochester City Lines. RCL still runs commuter buses from all over southeastern Minnesota to the Mayo Clinic, and is a subsidiary of Richfield Bus Company, which does charters, and until 1979, ran suburban service from Minneapolis to Excelsior. He is 89.

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Glover Family Tree has branches in Tobacco Road MD, St. Louis MO, Grant County WI, Perryville KY, Minneapolis MN, Spokane WA, San Francisco CA, Aberdeen Scotland, and Japan

By Sue Hunter Weir

Glovers had a hand in founding Spokane, WA and Mitsubishi in Japan

It pays to revisit stories that you thought you knew and take another look to see what you’ve missed or to see what information you have found that you didn’t have at the time that you wrote it. This is one of those stories that keeps growing.  The story of James Nettle Glover first appeared in The Alley Newspaper in January 2004.

In 2004, James Nettle Glover was thought to be one of three War of 1812 veterans buried in the cemetery.  As it turns out, he is one of at least four.  Another veteran was discovered after that story was written and, even though it is now wrong, the story is out on the internet and likely to linger there until the internet is replaced by something else.

That old Alley story about James Nettle Glover traveled 3,738 miles, all of the way to Aberdeen, Scotland.  There, a researcher is trying to connect “our” James Nettle Glover’s branch of the Glover family to a man named Thomas Blake Glover, who because of his involvement in Japanese politics, was called the “Scottish Samurai.”  He was the first Westerner to be awarded the Order of the Rising Sun and is credited with being one of the founders of Mitsubishi.  We have joined in the search for a person who might be the link between the two branches of the Glover family.  The search is somewhat confusing because there is a second James Nettle Glover, the nephew and namesake of “ours,” who was, among other things, the founder of Spokane, Washington.  But, if one James Nettle Glover is connected, it follows that the other must be as well.

Our James Nettle Glover was a remarkable man.  In 1931, his granddaughter, Mattie Jodon Fox, corresponded with Dr. Peter Holl, secretary of the Minneapolis Cemetery Protective Association.  She appears to have written in response to a letter that Dr. Holl had written requesting information about her grandfather.  She wrote:  “Grandfather was a man of deep religious faith, a member of the Baptist Church and a fine Christian gentleman greatly opposed to slavery.”

She wrote about the family’s move from Maryland to Missouri after the War of 1812.  It was there that James Nettle Glover met and married Elizabeth Dozier.  They owned a plantation but unlike his father and other members of his family, he refused to use slave labor.  According to Mrs. Fox, her grandfather “decided to move north to get away from slavery.”  He, his wife, their children and one of his sisters settled in Grant County, Wisconsin, in an area known as Abolition Hollow.

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Midtown Phillips Neighborhood Association News-August 2017

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EPIC Report-August 2017

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August 2017 Ventura Village

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Cedar Field: History, Requests, and Changes

LOCATION AND HISTORY

Cedar Avenue Field sits on a portion of a block between Cedar and 18th Avenues in the East Phillips neighborhood. Immediately to the north is the Little Earth Residents Association (LERA) building and the Little Earth of United Tribes Community is located across Cedar Avenue to the east. Cedar Avenue serves as the primary public park for the Little Earth Community.

In the summer of 1916 MPRB received petitions from area residents for a neighborhood park. MPRB reached out to David Stewart of St. Albans, Maine, who had previously donated land and funds to create Stewart Park farther west. In October of 1916 Stewart donated 1.89 acres of land (about one-half block) across 25th Street from the original South High School.

In response to requests for improving the land in 1919, the park board authorized spending up to $1,000 to improve the empty ground for a small combination baseball and football field. The action came in response to several requests, including one from the coach at South High School for his teams to be able to use the field. This was part of an overall plan for the park, featured in the 1919 annual report, which included a playground for children, a small shelter and wading pool. The estimated cost of the plan was $30,000, which would have been assessed against property owners in the area. The park is named for the street that runs alongside it.

Without assessment, the park board could only implement the ballfield, so in 1920 the field was graded and a backstop and benches were installed, as well as a sandbox for children. Playground equipment was installed in 1921.

In 1973, the 212-unit housing development Little Earth was constructed east of Cedar Avenue and on the land occupied by the original South High School. Little Earth is the only American Indian preference project-based Section 8 rental assistance community in the United States.

Cedar Avenue Field was upgraded in 1969 with the installation of playground equipment and creation of a hard-surfaced play area. The park was renovated again in 2003 with new playground equipment, a basketball court, and landscaping improvements. The hard courts were resurfaced in 2011.

EXISTING CONDITIONS AND CHARACTER Read the rest of this entry »

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OPEN STREETS MINNEAPOLIS 2017 – EAST LAKE STREET STYLE

No turning back at Cedar and Lake TW

Open Streets Minneapolis in year 6 brings together community groups and local businesses to temporarily close major thoroughfares to car traffic, and open them up for people walking, biking, skating, and playing.  Open Streets gives residents an opportunity to explore their neighborhood and local businesses in a safe, fun, and family-friendly way. It encourages the use of active transportation and healthy living, and has a goal of giving residents an opportunity to rethink our streets as public space.

Open Streets events take place in all quadrants of the City and Downtown and is an initiative of Our Streets Mpls. (formerly the Mpls. Bicycle Coalition), presented by the Center for Prevention at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of MN & co-sponsored by the City of Mpls.

OPEN STREETS happened on East Lake Street July 23, 11 AM to 5PM from Elliot Avenue to Minnehaha Avenue and down Minnehaha.  If you were among the hundreds walking,   biking, or skateboarding, you may have seen some of these views pictured below amongst thousands of other scenes without vehicular traffic on Lake Street—The Great Street—same as State Highway #7.

Photo Credit Key: TH-Talia Hansel, MM-Maggie Moran, PCH-Patrick Cabello Hansel, SG-Susan Gust, TW-Tim Will, StP K-ST. Paul Kubb Society

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¡Agua es Vida! Water is Life!

BY TALIA HANSEL

The Young Leaders Program of St. Paul’s Church and the Semilla Center for Healing and the Arts have been helping protect the Mississippi Watershed this summer in various ways:

  • Planting native plants on boulevards, to capture storm water runoff
  • Mulching gardens to keep moisture in vegetable beds
  • Educating children and adults about how to care for the watershed

We have started a campaign called “Take the Pledge”.  The pledge has three simple commitments:

  • I will drink water from the tap instead of buying bottled water.  (Bottled water is pretty much the same as tap water.  Some tap water sold is taken from deep in the earth, and has lowered the level of important aquifers.  Plus Minneapolis tap water is clean and safe)
  • I will clean up my street with my neighbors once a month. (Remember, everything that washes into storm sewers from our streets goes untreated into the river.
  • I will learn more about how I can care for our Mississippi Watershed at https://mwmo.org/learn/

There are many other ways to conserve water, such as not mowing your lawn short, and capturing rainwater off your house or garage.  If you are interested in learning more or becoming active in helping our watershed, call 612-724-3862 or e-mail semillacenter@gmail.com.  And follow us on Twitter and Instagram: @semillacenter

Funding for this project was provided by the Mississippi Watershed Management Organization.

Talia Hansel, Community Ambassador for Young Leaders

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Why walk?

By the Phillips Wellness 50+ Team

Walking in one of the easiest ways to increase physical activity and improve your health. Almost anyone can walk, it can be done anywhere and it doesn’t cost a cent.

  • Walking provides all sorts of benefits, including:
  • Lowering blood pressure
  • Reducing weight
  • Preventing onset of diabetes
  • Improving memory
  • Here are tips to help you stay safe on your walks:
  • Cross streets at crosswalks. Better yet, cross at corners with traffic signals.
  • Wear bright color clothing to be sure that you can be seen. Never assume a driver sees you crossing the street. Try to make eye contact with drivers as they approach.
  • Walk on sidewalks whenever possible. Keep an eye out for uneven surfaces that can be hazards for falling.
  • Wear good quality shoes. Look for shoes that have a thick sole, a wide base, closed back and good arch support.
  • Carry your ID and emergency contact information.

Phillips Wellness 50+ invites you to join us for a weekly group walk. Meet us in the lobbies of Ebenezer Park Apartments and Ebenezer Tower every Tuesday night at 6:00 P.M.

Phillips Wellness 50+ is an initiative to increase health and well-being, by and for people in the Phillips neighborhood. Contact Donna Nordin at 612-741-5180 or dnordin2@comcast.net for information.

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Will Another Important Building Be Demolished by Children’s MN?

BY HARVEY WINJE

“In 1916, the cornerstone was laid for the Messiah Lutheran Church at the intersection of East 25th Street and Columbus Avenue in South Minneapolis. It was designed by Harry Wild Jones, a leading Minneapolis architect.

“Today, the two-story red brick Gothic Revival structure rests comfortably within this mildly compact urban environment and is still serving its original religious purpose though no longer for a Lutheran congregation which began In service to a Northern European immigrant community. Now the building hosts Mennonite and Latino immigrant congregations.” (see Harry Wild Jones, Architect Messiah Lutheran Church: Deserving Historic Preservation” by Bob Roscoe The Alley Newspaper, April 2017, pg. 6)

If Children’s Hospitals MN fulfills their plans, that Sanctuary will soon not be there. The block of Phillips Community bordered by Chicago and Columbus Avenues and East 25th and 26th Streets was devastated a decade ago by the surreptitious purchase and land clearing by Children’s MN.  Twenty-six homes, a church, and an automobile service station were eliminated in order to build a 700 car parking ramp and a building for clinics.

This demolition was in direct violation of the signed 14 block Land-Use Agreement between the Phillips Community and Allina Health, Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Phillips Eye Institute, Children’s MN and their successors. The block that was demolished, Block 5, was described as follows in the Land-Use agreement: “This block contains a desirable level of mixed use commercial and residential that should be maintained. Keep up appearance and rehab buildings as necessary.

The only buildings escaping that major development in 2006 were Messiah Church and the 95’ long store-front building at the corner of 25th and Chicago Ave., originally built by Dr. O.A.Olson, who lived at 2516 Chicago Avenue.  The stores burned soon after the initial land purchase by Children’s MN and was demolished.  Now only the 100-year old Messiah Church Sanctuary remains.

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