NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Friday August 18th 2017

Keep citizen journalism alive!

Donatebutton_narrow

Archives

Midtown Global Music Festival

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Vincent Price Extravaganza of Film at the Pioneers & Soldiers Cemetery

August 26, 2017–The Last Man on Earth

September 9, 2017 The Conqueror Worm

September 23, 2017 The Abominable Dr. Phibes

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Fake News & catchy headlines sold papers & twisted history

“Don’t judge a book by its cover;” likewise, don’t judge a cemetery by it’s grave markers or lack of markers. The best clues are in the card files of the Caretaker’s Cottage.

There is something about cemeteries that lends itself to fantastic stories.  Over the years a number of these stories about people and events associated with Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery have appeared in the major local newspapers.

Early papers certainly had as one of their missions the goal of informing their readers, but in order to do so they had to develop a following.  In an age when the newspaper industry was thriving, competition was fierce, and there was nothing like an eye-catching headline or slightly-embellished story to sell papers, even if the story was not strictly speaking true.  Those papers helped spread misinformation and shape people’s perceptions about the cemetery.  Some of those mistaken ideas are:

No one (well, hardly anyone) is buried in Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery

In the late-teens and 1920s, several thousand people were disinterred from the cemetery and reburied elsewhere.  The numbers of these removals varied considerably but news stories left the impression that the cemetery was being emptied out.  And looks can be deceiving.  One hundred years later, passers-by and visitors are likely to estimate the number of burials in the cemetery by the number of marked graves.  On the face of it that seems reasonable and might work well in many, if not most, cemeteries, but it doesn’t work for Pioneers and Soldiers where there is only one marker for every ten or eleven burials.  There are an estimated 22,000 people remain in the cemetery.

“Uncle” Peter Wardell (sometimes Wardwell or Waddell) was the second person buried in the cemetery. Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

EPIC Report-June 2017

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Midtown Phillips Neighborhood Association News-June 2017

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

June 2017 Ventura Village

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

REPAVING Franklin Avenue between South 16th and 21st Avenues, Includes intersections of Franklin, Cedar and Minnehaha Avenues

Hennepin County is making improvements to and repaving Franklin Avenue (County Road 5) between South 16th and South 21st avenues. This includes the high volume intersection of Franklin and Cedar avenues, which is immediately adjacent to the intersection of Franklin and Minnehaha avenues.

Stan Lim

stanley.lim@hennepin.us

Phone: 612-282-3609

Current work and timeline

Work beginning week of May 15

Temporary signals were installed the week of May 15 at the intersection of Franklin Avenue and Cedar Avenue (County Road 152).  Crews will be working on various activities around the site, including at the intersection with Minnehaha Avenue. After the various improvements are made around the area, crews will then repave the road in the area.

Most of the initial work will be happening outside of the roadway, but there will be traffic control measures in place. As a result, motorists and commuters in the area should prepare for some traffic impacts and delays.

When complete in fall 2017, there will be a better driving surface, new turn lanes, improved north-south bike and pedestrian movements, updated curbs and gutter, and adjusted signal timing.

Project background

This segment of Franklin Avenue (County Road 5) is a high crash area, where there are many conflicts between vehicles, bicycles and pedestrians. Existing traffic operations also appear to be close to capacity.

Current funding allows for the area to be repaved in 2016. There are also supplemental county funds that may be available to make limited improvements to the area.

Hennepin County has been a part of a number of conversations with community members and various stakeholder groups regarding this intersection. The county has also collected input at various community events

No decisions have been made to date. Some of the improvements that have been discussed with stakeholders and the community include:

Closing Minnehaha Avenue north of Franklin Avenue

Removing the traffic signal at Franklin and Minnehaha avenues

Creating a southbound left turn lane from Cedar Avenue to East 22nd Street

Other considerations include:

Aligning bike lanes on Franklin Avenue

Improving north-south bike and pedestrian movements

Improving left-turn operations from Franklin Avenue to Cedar Avenue

Connecting with the recently developed NACDI Anpetu Wa’ste Cultural Arts Marketplace

Adjusting traffic signal timing

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

A New Column: PUBLIC TRANSIT

By JOHN CHARLES WILSON

Hello, People of the Phillips Community!  My name is John Charles Wilson and I have been graciously invited by the Editor of The Alley Newspaper to write a monthly column on the subject of public transit.

I grew up in St. Paul, near the present-day Rondo Library, in the 1970s and 1980s.  I have always loved buses and collected bus schedules as a hobby. When I was a teenager, I spent my money mostly on bus rides. I wanted to ride every route but there were some routes where it wasn’t possible without spending the night at the end of the line.  Fortunately, there are way fewer routes like that now than then, as many suburbs have attained all-day service.

My historical knowledge of the twin Cities transit system informs my opinions about how it can be made better.  I’ve always wanted to put my opinions to good use, and had my life gone differently I would probably have become a Transit Information Specialist, or better yet, a planner with Metro Transit.  Back when the system was called MTC, I dreamed of a gubernatorial appointment as a Metropolitan Transit Commissioner, but I now realize the Commission, and now the Met Council, don’t have the day-to-day authority over routes and schedules—the planners do.  All the formal leadership does is approve or deny the plans.

That leads to my first piece of advice for anyone trying to influence our transit system.  Aim your discussion at the Planning Department, not the Met Council itself.  Your ideas will be more likely to be seriously considered at that level.  Attend the public meetings that are advertised about various transit projects.  Actually engage the staff in conversations when possible.  They don’t bite.

As some of you know, the Met Council is considering a fare increase, the first one in nine years.  Presently the debate is whether to raise the fares 25 or 50 cents across the board.  I am proposing a different strategy: raise the non-rush hour fare, so the fare is the same at all times of day.  The rush hour tax was instituted June 1, 1982 as a “temporary” measure to circumvent a law limiting the bus fare to 60 cents.  That law is gone and so should the rush hour tax.

I hope to write something more Phillips specific next month.

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Cross-Cultural Urban garden unites neighbors and a business in a healthy mission impacting climate change

From left are Gandhi Mahal Interfaith Garden partners last summer: Ruhel Islam, owner and executive chef at Gandhi Mahal Restaurant; Claire Baglien, Minnesota Interfaith Power & Light office manager; Ritchie Robertson Two Bulls, arts therapist for Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center; and the Rev. Robert Two Bulls of First Nations Kitchen and All Saints Episcopal Indian Mission.

By Marilyn Moyer, Guest Columnist

In a backyard garden tucked into the Corcoran neighborhood, far more is flourishing than tomatoes, eggplant and squash. Here, people whose roots lie worlds apart are working together to strengthen the health of their community, while doing their part to address climate change.

The Gandhi Mahal Interfaith Garden is a unique collaboration between a Bangladeshi Indian restaurant, a Native American ministry and a non-profit working to address climate justice with faith communities across the state.

On May 12, these unlikely partners launched their urban garden’s second season. Dozens of volunteers turned out to prepare the soil and plant the seeds that will grow into a wide variety of fresh vegetables. Those include foods that are traditional staples in Bangladeshi cooking – such as spicy Asian chilies and cilantro – as well as those culturally connected to Native Americans, such as certain varieties of squash and beans.

Many people will share in the coming bounty, including the paying diners at nearby Gandhi Mahal Restaurant, and the guests who gather at First Nations Kitchen for a free, indigenous diet-based meal on Sunday evenings. The kitchen is part of the outreach ministry of All Saints Episcopal Indian Mission.

After the Sunday evening meal, people from across the neighborhood, as well as First Nations Kitchen’s guests, are welcome to gather at the garden, four blocks from where dinner was served.

“People who come for open garden night can pick the produce they want to take home,” explained Claire Baglien, who oversees the garden and works with volunteers to tend it.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Corrine Zala, longtime Phillips Resident, Housing Facilitator and Coach, Comedienne, Cook, and Preservationist

Corrine Zala, b. February 14, 1955 died April 26th, 2017 pictured here with “Les Walstein, my very best friend.”

BY SUE HUNTER WEIR, JANA METGE, DONNA NESTEA, and David PIEHL

Corrine Zala. A name known by so many families in this neighborhood.  We met Corrine because she sold us our homes, many our first homes. She negotiated through the stacks of paperwork which none of us understood. For years she ran the ‘Neighbors Helping Neighbors’ program out of Abbott Northwestern Hospital – a grant program for down payment assistance and for home improvements. Abbott Northwestern, being a partner and helping the Neighborhood which surrounds it.

Corrine knew that some of her first-time home buyers needed support not only to guide them through the process of purchasing a home but to help them maintain the properties that they had worked so hard to own. Long after the papers were signed and the deals were sealed she visited her clients to make sure that they had everything they needed to keep their homes in good shape.

Then there was saving our homes from MCDA tearing them down. Corrine was known to block bulldozers from demolishing perfectly structurally sound homes.  This activism led to many policy changes.

Then there was Historic Preservation. In Central Neighborhood she helped secure resources to move homes rather than demolish them during a Park Expansion project.  She purchased a home north of the Historic Healy block on 2nd Ave and 31st Street and worked to save her home and those adjacent to hers.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
 Page 6 of 156  « First  ... « 4  5  6  7  8 » ...  Last »