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Posts Tagged ‘February 2011’

2323 11th Phillips Community Center Update Park Board”'s Planning Committee Passes PCC Plan

by Robert Albee It wasn”'t really a surprise! January 5th”'s Minneapolis Park Board Meeting was the occasion when Planning Committee members voted unanimously to support the Phillips Community Parks Initiative”'s (PCPI) re-use plan to utilize available space within the 49,000 square foot facility. The plan promotes programs and activities to serve persons of all ages and cultures residing within the Phillips Community. No surprise”“because on December 15, Planning Committee commissioners invited the Phillips Community Parks Initiative (PCPI) to publicly present its plan for re-use of the Phillips Community Center praising these efforts as an excellent beginning for a plan that combined community-based tenants working side-by-side with the Park Board”'s Community Service Area (CSA) #6 staff. When the Request For Proposal was issued by the Park Board, commissioners and staff sought the following: Community partners that will add programming and services that are compatible and complimentary to the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board. Utilizing all the space available in the building for community use. A tenant or tenants that have a the vision and financial resources to renovate the interior and exterior of the building and provide rental income to offset the building utilities, operating costs and provide for long term building maintenance and operation of the center. A service provider with a strong interest in the community and a solid reputation for service. According to a December 15th Memorandum submitted by Jayne Miller, MPRB”'s new Superintendent: The proposal submitted by the Phillips Coalition [PCPI} is comprehensive and includes a wide range of services to be provided to the community in addition to services provided by the MPRB. The Pillsbury Waite House, a tenant in another MPRB building, is included in the Phillips Coalition and would provide many complimentary youth services that would be a [...]

Momentary absence.Flames prevail. Mother burned, and grieving

Momentary absence.Flames prevail. Mother burned, and grieving

By Sue Hunter Weir In the early years of the last century the Minneapolis Tribune”'s coverage tended toward the sensational, especially when it came to covering tragedies involving children. But every now and then a reporter captured the sense of loss and grief, like in this excerpt from a story written by an unidentified Tribune reporter on January 14, 1911: A white hearse wound its way between snow-covered mounds and marble shafts at Layman”'s cemetery yesterday and stopped at the door of the vault room. From the three carriages that followed it a little group of people stepped and moved silently toward the vault. A man in a black cassock led. Following close came two old men, each looking straight ahead, their eyes dim with something besides age. Last came a little figure in deepest mourning, toil worn hand clutching the sleeve of the man who walked beside her. The door of the hearse opened and a square white coffin was borne out and carried into the vault room. It was very light. The last rites over the bodies of the three Rooth babies had begun. Three days earlier the three children of Andrew and Ellen Rooth had been killed in a fire at their home, 3234 41st Avenue South. It was cold that day, and Ellen Rooth had left the three children alone for a moment while she ran an errand to one of the family”'s neighbors. When she looked out of the window to make sure that everything was all right, she saw flames and smoke coming from the back of her house. Mrs. Rooth ran home and tried to open the door but was forced back by the intense heat. She tried again, but was again unsuccessful. A neighbor prevented her from trying a third time. Mrs. Rooth, burned on her face, neck, and arms and in shock, was taken to the City Hospital. Her husband, Andrew, was called home from work. When he reached home and learned what had happened, he, too, collapsed and was taken to the hospital. The “two old men” referred to in the story were [...]

Searching ”“ A Serial Novelle Chapter 23: “Turning Darker”

Searching ”“ A Serial Novelle Chapter 23: “Turning Darker”

By Patrick Cabello Hansel We can”'t control what is coming. We can”'t foresee it. Angel and Luz, upon leaving the Mercado Central were as in love as two can be. Together, come what may. What came was not a stab from Angel”'s past, but from Luz”'. As they walked west on Lake Street, they didn”'t notice the man standing at the corner a block and a half down. They didn”'t see that he had seen them, and was waiting with eyes like radar. As they got closer, Angel could tell the kind of man he was: the kind you nod at as you pass, but don”'t engage in conversation. The kind whose business takes all. They intended to go around him, and continue to Luz”' aunt”'s house. She wanted to talk with her about all that had happened. But as they approached the corner, the man stepped into their path and laughed, a laugh swarming with deceit. “Well look who”'s here””little old Luz. Lucy Goosey, alive in Minneapolis. How have you been, sweetie?” Her body tightened, like a rope pulled taut. Later, Angel would say something snapped in her eyes, a sharp mix of fear, anger and pain. She tried to pull Angel towards her, in order to get around the man, but he blocked their way, almost pushing them into the building. (more…)

THIS IS GOOD OR I”'LL EAT MY CHRISTMAS TREE

By Jane Thomson My first recipe is from 97 ORCHARD , an Edible History of Five Immigrant Families, by Jane Ziegelman. This book interests me because my father grew up in a New York tenement (the word just meant “rental building” at the time; I don”'t know how shabby his family”'s apartment was, but I suspect it was not spacious). The building at 97 Orchard is on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, and is now the Tenement Museum. It was built about 1860 and was abandoned after 1935. It has been preserved and restored. The first time I visited the building about 20 years ago, it was left just as it had been found. The tour started in the narrow dark front hall with a dingy frieze painted on the wall, a tin ceiling and rickety stairs going up to the next of several stories. We were then taken to an apartment composed of two small rooms with one window between them and one window to the outside. There were layers of old wallpaper peeling, and numbers on the wall showing the quantity of trousers that had been sewn, as the apartment was also a sweat shop. Since then several apartments have been restored and decorated as they might have been when an immigrant family lived there - one for an Irish family, one for a German family, one for an Italian family and one for a Jewish family. Furnished and decorated it is much more cheerful; but I hope one apartment has still been left as found. The recipe is one that might have been made for a Jewish family that lived at 97 Orchard, the Rogarshevsky”˜s. It was contributed to the book by Frieda Schwartz, who was born on the Lower East Side in 1918. (more…)

The Fighter

The Fighter

Howard McQuitter II Movie Corner HowardMcQuitterii@yahoo.com The Fighter Cast: Mark Wahlberg (Mickey Ward), Christian Bale (Dicky Eklund), Melessia Leo (Alice Ward), Amy Adams (Charlene Fleming), Bianca Hunter (Cathy Pork Ecklund), Eric McDarmott (Cindy ”˜Tar”' Ecklund), Jill Ouigg (Donna Eckund Jaynes), Dendrie Taylor (Gail ”˜Red Dog” Ecklund), Kate O.”'Brien (Phyllis Beaver Ecklund), Jena Lamia (Sherri ward), Cadin Dwyer (Kasie ward), Jack McGee (George Ward). (R) Running time: 115 minutes. Director: David O. Russell. Boxing for the wards is a family affair. Mickey Ward (Mark Wahlberg) is an upcoming boxer, his older brother Dicky Ecklund (Christian Bale), a former boxer whose current activity is spent often in a crackhouse, and their mother, Alice Ward (Melissa Leo), is the boxing manager. She organizes Mickey”'s fights and Dicky trains him. Dicky brags he”'s once gave Sugar Ray Leonard a few good licks Mickey”'s caught in a bind of a possessive mother and five sisters and his idol Dicky sent to prison for crack and an assault on police officers. When Mickey”'s love interest Charlene Fleming (Amy Adams) enters his life, his family attempts to sever their relationship. As such, Mickey”'s boxing career seems doomed much like Dicky”'s. Like other boxing films of the past such as “City of Conquest”(1040),”Requiem for a Heavyweight”(1962),”Fat City”(1972),the theme is boxer from a white working class neighborhood in crisis. “The Fighter”” is adequate with fine performances by Melissa Leo and Cristian Bale in particular.  

February 2011 Daves”' Dumpster

February 2011 Daves”' Dumpster

COMMENTARY: Changing your diet

By Randall Grey There are so many products in our cupboards and refrigerators today that contain High Fructose Corn Syrup.  If you were to look at the ingredients of the products which are in your cupboard or refrigerator right now, you will find an ingredient called High Fructose Corn Syrup. Just in my home alone, I found it in the cereals, canned vegetables, ice creams, some of the dips, salad dressings, mayonnaise, jams and jellies, sodas, frostings, pie fillings, flavored waters and also in some of the sauces. After looking at all the food items consumed daily, almost every thing in every meal, contains High Fructose Corn Syrup.  And just think, these are just in the products in our own homes that contain this substitute additive.  Now, imagine how much of this substitute food additive is in foods we eat in restaurants. (more…)

Anyone living in the Backyard area can help their community to improve health

By Janice Barbee, Cultural Wellness Center The Backyard Initiative was started two years ago as a community partnership between Allina Hospitals and Clinics and the residents of Phillips, Powderhorn Park, Central, and Corcoran which has the goal of improving the health of the community. Health is defined as 1) a state of physical, mental, social and spiritual well-being; it is not only the absence of infirmity and disease, 2) the state of balance, harmony, and connectedness within and amongst many systems ”“ the body, the family, the community, the environment, and culture; it cannot be seen only in an individual context, and 3) an active state of being; it cannot be achieved by being passive. This definition of health is not just a state of being ”“ it is a process of becoming, and the residents of the Backyard are using this description of health to become healthier. They are actively working on projects which increase balance, harmony, and connectedness within the community. The core work of the Backyard Initiative is done within the Citizen Health Action Teams or CHATs. A CHAT is composed of a group of people who work together on a common concern or issue in order to improve the health of the community and build community. Each CHAT meets at least monthly to plan ahead and make decisions, and then members of the CHAT carry out work between meetings. All the CHATs come together at least once a month to update each other on their progress and discuss common problems and strategies. They have agreed upon a list of principles that help CHATs to be inclusive and effective. (more…)

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