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Powderhorn Joins Minneapolis Edible Boulevards!

Powderhorn Joins Minneapolis Edible Boulevards!

Elder Hope Flanagan led a foraging class at Four Sisters Farm in East Phillips on June 4.photos provided by Minneapolis Edible Boulevards By MICHELLE SHAW, Minneapolis Edible Boulevards Do you live in the Powderhorn Park neighborhood? If so, you can now join your neighbors who live in Cedar Riverside, Ventura Village, Midtown Phillips, Phillips West and East Phillips by applying for an edible boulevard. Hindolo Pokawa, the new environmental justice community coordinator for the Powderhorn Park Neighborhood Association (PPNA), has been leading the effort to bring the two groups together. He is just as passionate as Minneapolis Edible Boulevards about having Powderhorn residents participate in this movement. “Our human and ecological relationships are based on extracting and exploiting each other and the environment. If we do not interact, know how people are feeling, or know the impact of our extractive and exploitative dynamics, ideas would never generate,” Pokawa says. Both groups are intentionally setting out to be inclusive, work towards food justice, and heal our environment together.   So what exactly does that mean for the participating Southside Green Zone neighborhoods listed above? Minneapolis Edible Boulevards (MEB) has funding to go towards teaching people how to transform the space between sidewalks and curbs into an edible boulevard, in addition to paying for soil testing, seeds, seedlings, organic soil, and compost. An application is posted on the our Facebook page, which you’re invited  to join, or reach out to the email below to get the application link sent to you if you’re not on Facebook. For those who live in a nearby neighborhood that isn’t currently participating, contact your neighborhood association to let them know if you’d like them to create a partnership with Edible Boulevards. All are invited to attend MEB monthly cooking classes being held at local community gardens over the summer. [...]

Last Call to Apply for 2022 Edible Boulevards!

Last Call to Apply for 2022 Edible Boulevards!

By MICHELLE SHAW Do you live in Cedar Riverside, Ventura Village, Midtown Phillips, Phillips West or East Phillips? If so, you are a resident of the Southside Green Zone and you’re eligible to apply for participation in the Minneapolis Edible Boulevards initiative. We have funding to go towards teaching people how to transform the space between the sidewalk and curb into an edible boulevard, as well as for soil testing, seeds, organic soil, and compost. An application is posted on our Minneapolis Edible Boulevards Facebook page, which we invite you to join. If you live in another neighborhood and want to participate, contact your neighborhood association to let them know you’d like them to partner with us. If you’re willing and able to volunteer in any way, we would greatly appreciate your help. Possibilities include co-administering our Facebook page, pick-up and delivery of compost and organic soil to garden build sites, help with gardening, photographing garden creations and tabling at events. Just contact Michelle if you’re interested! Upcoming Events (see our Facebook page for details) June 4: Foraging webinar with elder Hope Flanagan of Dream of Wild HealthJuly 9: Cooking from the Garden with Natalia Mendez, (location TBD)August 13: Kelly Shay (location TBD)September 10: Natalia Mendez (location TBD) Contact Michelle at MinneapolisEdibleBoulevards@gmail.com with any questions.

Procrastination Saves Lives!

Procrastination Saves Lives!

overgrown bench/ ben heath By MARY ELLEN KALUZA Early in my gardening career (some 4+ decades ago) I cleaned up the garden each fall, pulling everything out, cutting down plants and stems so that everything was ready to go in the spring. That didn’t last many years. By first frost I was soon ready to be done with gardening and looked forward to just shoveling snow for a few months. Clean out was left till spring. I soon noticed birds feeding on the dried seed heads left standing during the winter. So, I now had an excellent reason to not clean away the dead plants: feeding the birds. Also, in spring I found last year’s vegetable plants munched down to nubs with abundant rabbit turds left behind, presumably in thanks for getting the bunnies through the winter. Rabbit poop is an excellent fertilizer with four times more nutrients than cow or horse manure, and is twice as nutritious as chicken manure. It is not a “hot” manure like horse, cow, or chicken poop - it doesn’t have to be composted first. And the rabbits handle application for free. All I have to do is put off cleaning the garden! Recently I’ve learned that delaying garden clean up longer into the spring pays off, too. Turns out many bee species make their winter nests in the hollow stems of last season’s flowers, weeds, and branches. Some overwinter in the leaf matter left laying around or burrow into the soil for their winter get-away. Bees emerge at different temperatures after winter, depending on the species - at minimum with a steady 55º - 60º for several days. When I absolutely have to get moving on planting, I will carefully pile stems off to the side or make a stem display in a flower pot. By mid June everyone should have left their cozy stems and I can finish the clean up. Or not. When those bees do come out, they need to eat! Which brings us to another bee life-saving procrastination tactic: No Mow May. No Mow May is a growing movement, and it is simply that [...]

Fall Chores: Four Tips to Save Money and Time

By MARY ELLEN KALUZA November. Most of the leaves have fallen. Some places have had a killing frost. The skies can threaten snow. I love this time of year: so dramatic! It’s also a prelude to winter, the season of relaxation and catching up on reading or TV. I enjoy doing fall chores during this month. I like the crisp air for working outdoors, the quality of the daylight, the tidying up and the buttoning down. Ignoring those chores can be costly in money and time. Here are my tips to save both: Leaves In Minneapolis we are required to use compostable bags for our leaves, and those bags are pricey. I watch my neighbors fill up a dozen bags or more with leaves for the city to pick up. That’s a lot of raking, bending and hauling and a lot of money besides. Instead, mow your leaves! Chop them into little pieces that will break down and feed your lawn. You’ll save time, money and your back! You’ll also be enjoying some hot chocolate while your neighbors are still stuffing those mountains of leaves into bags. Flower Pots In your enthusiasm for the end of drab winter and the birth of flowers and greenery again, you invested in pots and soil to brighten up the homestead. What to do with them now that the flowers have succumbed to the cold? Bring the pots with the soil inside to your garage, porch or basement. You’ll preserve any decorative finish and keep the pots from repeated freezing and thawing, which can break them. The soil can be reused with some added soil next spring. Garden Hoses Water expands when it freezes and can crack hoses. Drain the hoses well, and store in a protected area. Storing them is crucial; one year, I had an icicle fall and puncture a hose I neglected to put away. Leaking hoses are a drag, too, and must be repaired or replaced. A little effort this fall will save you a headache in the spring. Seeds All those beautiful flowers you planted last spring have lost their beauty and gone to seed. It is their [...]

Cooking From Your Garden with Kelly Shay

Cooking From Your Garden with Kelly Shay

by Michelle Shaw Join us for our next Edible Boulevards cooking class on Thursday, October 28 from 5:00-6:30pm via Zoom! Kelly Shay from Harmonious World will teach us how to make Cozy Autumn Lentil Stew (ingredients list will be posted on our Facebook page a week before the event - purchase ingredients in advance to cook your supper with us that evening). Bring someone into the kitchen with you, or come on your own. The first 5 participants whopre-register from the Southside of Minneapolis by noon on October 24 will get a $10 gift card for the Seward Co-op. Join our Minneapolis Edible Boulevards Facebook group, and scroll down to the October 28 event. There you”™ll find the preregistration for Cooking from Your Garden with Kelly Shay. Please help us spread the word! If you miss out in person, you”™ll be able to watch the recording on our Minneapolis Edible Boulevards Facebook page. If you have any questions, send us a message on our Facebook page. We can”™t wait to cook and grow with you! Photos provided by Edible Boulevards

Edible Boulevards

Edible Boulevards

By MICHELLE SHAW Join us for our Edible Boulevards cooking classes! Our class will help you utilize the harvest from your own garden to create simple, delicious summer and autumn recipes. We were delighted to have Appetite for Change teach our first two classes, and we”™re excited to welcome Kelly Shay, founder of Harmonious World, to lead our September and October classes. You”™ll learn about the nutritional value of the produce in each recipe, and when the class is over, you will have made that evening”™s meal for yourself and your family. Invite your partner, a friend, or your kids to the Zoom class, and cook the meal together! Here”™s what we have in store for you: Thursday, September 30 with Kelly Shay: Vegetable Basil Stir-fry w/ Quinoa and a Side Salad -- 5:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.Thursday, October 28 with Kelly Shay: Cozy Autumn Lentil Stew -- 5:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. Register in advance: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMscOCprz8vGtdw0iHhiRISE1BfEDky87Sv Edible Boulevards is an initiative focused on making fresh produce accessible in every Minneapolis neighborhood, starting with Green Zone neighborhoods, which have suffered environmental injustice and food apartheid policies for decades. Our garden sites get tested for lead, because children in Green Zone neighborhoods typically experience higher blood lead levels. We teach participants self-sustainability in gardening, so that they can share their skills with neighbors, friends and family, and grow their own food together. We are partnered with the East Phillips Improvement Coalition (EPIC) and have funding to build several gardens for residents of East Phillips. Please contact minneapolisedibleboulevards@gmail.com if you”™d like an application. If you”™re interested, and don”™t live in East Phillips, we still welcome you to attend our free cooking classes. The first five people from South Minneapolis who [...]

Free Native Pollinator Plants! Plantas Polinizadores Nativas Gratuitos!

Free Native Pollinator Plants! Plantas Polinizadores Nativas Gratuitos!

Corcoran Pollinator Project has free native plants and pollinator gardening resources to share with Phillips residents. For more info check out corcoranpollinatorproject.org or email corcoranpollinatorproject@gmail.com. Corcoran Pollinator Project tiene plantas nativas y recursos de jardineria polinizadores gratuitos para compartir con los residentes de Phillips. Para obtener más información, envie un correo electrónico a corcoranpollinatorproject@ gmail.com.

Kid’s Summer Stuff!

Kid’s Summer Stuff!

Fun Activities for Youth at Parks and Libraries in and around Phillips Neighborhood COMPILED By LINDSEY FENNER Minneapolis Parks (to register and find even more activities go to https:// apm.activecommunities.com/minneapolisparks/). Contact the park for sched- ule changes and availability. East Phillips Park, 2399 17th Avenue South. 612-370-4888 Jr. Naturalists: Drop-In Discovery, Tuesday 5-7PM, through August Join us for no-touch or easily sanitizable nature exploring ”” such as meeting live animals, dissecting an owl pellet, playing water quality mini-golf, planting seeds, and much more! No need to register, just stop on by for free family fun! Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. Land Back Mask Making: July 26-30, 2PM-5PM Free, ages 10-14, register online. The Artist in Residence (AiR) program will focus on Land Back Face Mask Making: An activity designed to educate and to gain the knowledge to care for Grandmother Earth. Sculpture by Dakota artist Graci Horne, who will be leading the mask making activities Phillips Park, 2324 11th Avenue South. 612-370-4946 Film Festival: Mondays through August 30, 6PM-8PM Each week Phillips Community Center will bring films to youth. We will showcase the creativity of film makers and facilitate discussion on cinema- tography. Youth will be a part of this program process and collaborate to pick films and topics to discuss! This activity is an ActivePass Program and a pass is required to participate. Please go to your neighborhood recreation center during business hours to sign up for a free ActivePass. Youth Adventures: Monday through Friday 1PM-6PM Free, ages 10-16, Youth Adventures at Phillips is the place to be! You can come get homework help, use the computer lab with our super fast WiFi from Comcast”™s LiftZone, play video/table games or join in on daily art/stem activi- ties! This activity is an ActivePass Program and a pass is required to participate. [...]

Deep Winter Greenhouse: Tamales y Bicicletas

Deep Winter Greenhouse: Tamales y Bicicletas

Let’s Get This Garden Started!

Let’s Get This Garden Started!

By MARY ELLEN KALUZA Dreaming of spring and summer... (illustrations by Jessie Merriam, photos by Mary Ellen Kaluza of her garden) March in Minnesota. The days are noticeably longer. We are longing to have dirt under our nails. But isn't it too early? There's still snow on the ground. It's the perfect time to get the garden started. First: Plan your garden Know your space””how much sun do you get in the different areas? Put your parka on and go outside. Imagine the trees are fully leafed-out and the sun moving high across the sky. Most vegetables need a lot of sun. Leafy greens can do well in more shaded areas and may actually produce larger leaves valiantly trying to absorb as much sunlight as possible. Save the sunniest areas for tomatoes, peppers, and other fruiting plants. Carrots and other root vegetables will tolerate some shade. Make your wish list, then pare it down to fit your space. Map out your garden with sun and plant size in mind. Buy your seeds! Thinking about how the light will be when the leaves come out and the sun is in it's summer trajectory helps know where to put certain plants. Preparing your soil and planning climbing plants, root crops, and herbs saves headaches down the road! Second: Start your seeds Starting plants from seed is a great way to save money. Seeds will stay viable for a few years and store easily in a glass jar in the fridge. You can get dozens of plants out of a $2 - $3 packet.  A lot of vegetables can be seeded directly into the soil. Read the seed packets for planting times and instructions. In short growing seasons, like Minnesota, many plants must be started inside a month or two before they can go outside. Save clear plastic clamshell packaging from lettuce or berries to start your seeds.You can control the moisture and warmth with the lid. Save other plastic tubs ”“ yogurt, sour cream, anything you can punch drain holes into for transplanting the little starts into later [...]

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