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Metro Transit: Lake Street and I-35W Station Opens

By JOHN CHARLES WILSON It’s finally happening! The new bus station in the middle of I-35W at Lake Street is opening Monday, 18 October 2021. (This means it’s already open by the time this issue is published. Such is the lag time inherent in a monthly newspaper.) As I’m sure everyone who’s read my column knows, it’s for the new Orange Line to Burnsville, which begins 4 December. In the meantime, Metro Transit Routes 535, 553, 578, 597, and Southwest Transit Routes 600 and 695 will be using it, joined by various MVTA express routes as of 20 November. Local Metro Transit Routes 21 and 27 will provide connections on Lake Street, just below the station. Speaking of Lake Street, planning for the B Line, a Bus Rapid Transit line to open on Lake Street in 2024, is chugging right along. Presently, Route 21 is the slowest and second busiest route in the whole Metro Transit bus system. Anyone who’s had to ride a 21 during a rush-hour traffic jam knows it’s not a good experience. The B Line will have all-door boarding; you will buy your ticket or scan your card before getting on, like the light rail. This will save a lot of time. There won’t be as many stops, which will speed service but be hard on people who can’t walk far. For those of us who need it, the 21 will still run once every half hour, while the B Line will run every 10 minutes. The B Line may also get its own dedicated lane. If that happens, even more of a time savings will be had by all. I’ve used the similar A Line on Snelling Avenue, and it really is great!

Ingebretsen’s Celebrates 100 Years

Ingebretsen’s Celebrates 100 Years

By Laila Simon, Ingebretsen’s staff The western side of Ingebretsen's in the 90s, including the Dala Style mural painted by Judith Kjenstad. This year marks the 100th anniversary of Ingebretsen’s Nordic Marketplace, the hub for shopping all things Nordic in South Minneapolis. A neighborhood place, Ingebretsen’s is a store where you can stock up on everyday items like butter and eggs, as well as specialty imports. As a fourth generation family business, celebrating one hundred years is an incredible milestone. Ask any member of the family or staff and they’ll tell you that the business is still here because of Ingebretsen’s loyal customers. You might know Ingebretsen’s as an online store for Christmas gifts and traditional foods, or as the place you drive by in December in Minnesota, with a line of people waiting in subzero temperatures all the way down the block. You may have even heard of people making “lute” (lutefisk) pilgrimages from out of state each year. But Ingebretsen’s has come to represent a lot more. It is a cultural and community gathering spot for people to share their heritage and keep family traditions alive. Food has always been at the center of Ingebretsen’s, and shopping at the Butcher Shop & Deli is a tradition in and of itself, passed down through generations. Nancy Carlson, a customer, said, “My dad worked at Peterson Motors on 38th E Lake St from the late ’50s to the late ’60s. He would stop at Ingebretsen's at least once a week for Scandinavian food (both parents are Norwegian). I've continued that tradition, although it's not weekly, more like monthly.” A story many people will recognize from their own family histories: Karl (Charlie) Ingebretsen immigrated to the United States from Norway in the early twentieth century. Charlie passed through Ellis Island in 1904, and soon got a job on the docks. He traveled west to Fargo, North Dakota, where he learned butchering; he then moved south [...]

In The Heart of the Beast Theatre Update

In The Heart of the Beast Theatre Update

BOARD UPDATE AUGUST 12 2021In 2021, HOBT has been working to restart our organization and adapt to the impacts of COVID-19. We considered every path forward that would put us in the best possible position to live out our mission and carry the important work of the MayDay Council into the future.In conversation and with the input of HOBT staff and the MayDay Council, the HOBT Board of Directors has voted to sell the Avalon Theatre, our home since 1988.It”™s time to find a new, smaller home that will allow us to live into our vision of a decentralized MayDay. That includes moving into a new space that is more sustainable and accessible.HOBT is also in the process of moving out of our puppet storage warehouse, which was rented to store the thousands of puppets in HOBT”™s collection.The puppets will return to the artists that created them, museums who can house them (both locally and nationally), and HOBT will be maintaining a smaller collection to carry our work into the future.We have come to these decisions out of a fierce commitment to the power of puppet and mask performance to create new ways forward together with our beloved community.We give abundant gratitude for all the brilliant work done over the past 48 years: the many artists, staff, board members, and volunteers who have given their whole hearts to the work of HOBT. Thank you!As we sell the building and move out of puppet storage, we are turning the page on this chapter of our organization.With hope, we are embarking on a new journey: finding a new space, creating new decentralized MayDay experiences, and choosing a new name for our puppet and mask theater.For more information and to read our full announcement, go here: https://hobt.org/the-avalon/ The Avalon Theatre at 1500 E Lake Street has been home to In the Heart of the Beast Puppet and Mask Theatre since 1988.

Midtown Phillips Neighborhood News

Midtown Phillips Neighborhood News

Around the Neighborhood: Hopeful Messages

Around the Neighborhood: Hopeful Messages

By BEN HEATH

“Who Dyed?” “What is next to Which?” “Who”'s on First?” *

“Who Dyed?” “What is next to Which?” “Who”'s on First?” *

By Sue Hunter Wier Uncle Peter first? Joan Wardwell second?, all at Hodsdon”'s at Bloomington and Lake Farm next to Layman”'s In the late 19-teens and early 1920s several newspaper articles claimed that “Uncle” Peter Wardell (sometimes Wardwell or Waddell) was the second (or even the first) person buried in Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery. He was buried, so the stories go, either under what is now the bus stop at Cedar Avenue and Lake Street or in the far southeastern corner of the cemetery at Lake Street and 21st Avenue. Supposedly, Uncle Peter was an employee of Martin Layman who had moved to Minnesota with members of the Layman family in 1853. There”'s only one problem””“Uncle” Peter didn”'t exist. The confusion about this imaginary man is understandable, though. There is a person with a similar name who was among the earliest burials in the cemetery. Her name was Joan Robbins Wardwell. Mrs. Wardwell died from cancer in 1858, supposedly the first recorded case of cancer in Minneapolis. Although one of her granddaughters claimed that Mrs. Wardwell was the second person buried in the cemetery, that isn”'t true either””there were at least two dozen people buried in the cemetery before she was. What is true is that her husband, George Wardwell, worked for Martin Layman, the cemetery”'s original owner. George Wardwell surveyed the section of Layman”'s farmland that became the first municipal cemetery on the west side of the river. In return, he was given two burial plots. (more…)

Fish Tacos by La Sirena Gorda, “The Fat Mermaid.”

Fish Tacos by  La Sirena Gorda, “The Fat Mermaid.”

By Courtney Algeo The truth is this: I went to the Midtown Global Market on a rainy Tuesday evening to review Pacific Islander Cuisine. We went around 6:00 p.m.”“prime dinnertime”“but only one person was working at the restaurant, cooking and dishing up all of the made to order food herself. She looked like she was working extremely hard, and the food she was making smelled delicious. Unfortunately, I suffer from what some call the hanger. Hanger is a portmanteau of the words “hungry” and “angry”, that signifies the emotion contained in the moment when your desire for food turns into a hot, burning rage. Or, perhaps it”'s just a case of crippling impatience. To shield those near me from my hanger, I simply turned around in the aisle at Midtown Global Market and ordered some delightful fish tacos from La Sirena Gorda, which means (hilariously) “the fat mermaid.” Although this was the first time a name had been associated with the restaurant, I had heard a lot about the fish tacos before I stumbled into this dining experience. Whenever tacos are brought up in conversation (which, if you know me, is a lot) friends and strangers alike always ask if I”'ve had the fish tacos at the Midtown Global Market. Now, I can grin slightly, rub my belly, lift my chin and say to them, “Why yes. Yes I have.” The tacos come in orders of two or four. I would recommend always getting four. This is not because they are small, by any means, but rather the tacos come, for the most part, unassembled. If you order four tacos, you get a healthy portion of taco innards, and then four soft tortilla shells. I”'m not sure why they do this, but I was glad to be served that way, because I was in control of how full I filled my tacos, and that made me feel like an empowered consumer. If you order two tacos, I assume you will get a smaller pile of fish bits, and only two tortillas. You will also feel strangely [...]

“Hats Off” as Honors are Given

“Hats Off” as Honors are Given

May 19, 2011, marked the perfect ending to a perfect week for Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery””the kind of week that comes around once every 83 years. It was a week in which we celebrated the history of Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial (formerly Layman”'s) Cemetery while making a little history of our own. May is National Preservation Month, a time when preservationists and their supporters call attention to efforts to save the nation”'s historic treasures. One of those national treasures is right here in Phillips Community Grand Opening of the Restored Main Gate “Hinges” on contributions On Tuesday, May 17th, about 60 people attended the unveiling of Phase I of the restoration of the cemetery”'s gates and the 13 sections of the fence that were in the worst condition. The weather was glorious, the tulips were in full bloom, and even the dandelions looked festive. A lime-green dune buggy buzzed around one of the vacant lots across from the Lake Street gates where guests gathered to listen to speakers. A gentleman walking down Lake Street removed his hat and held it over his heart as he passed by the cemetery gates. Council Member Gary Schiff made the opening remarks. He was followed by Winnie Layman Fernstrom, great-great-granddaughter of the cemetery”'s original owners; Britta Bloomberg from the State Historic Preservation Office; Chad Larsen, Chair of the Heritage Preservation Commission; Joyce Wisdom, Executive Director of the Lake Street Business Council; and me, as Chair of Friends of the Cemetery. The message was clear: this project wouldn”'t have been possible without the hard work and generous support of many individuals and agencies. The State Historic Preservation Office and the City of Minneapolis have provided the lion”'s share of funding, but the value of contributions from those who have adopted pickets can not be overstated. Funders want to know, and rightly so, [...]

SEARCHING ”“ a Serial Novelle CHAPTER 12: The Raid

By Patrick Cabello Hansel People running in all directions. Shouting. Horns. Babies screaming. Right in front of him, an old man tripped on the ice and fell face down, splitting open his upper lip and breaking his nose. Blood poured out upon his worn Vikings sweater and onto the fresh snow. What is going on? Angel thought. Did someone get shot? He began to walk towards the uproar that was centered at Bloomington and Lake. Three or four SUV”'s with dark tinted windows were blocking the intersection. Cops were putting up barricades. A mother holding a baby and pulling a toddler along by the sleeve of his jumpsuit yelled at him: “!La Migra! ¡Corre! ¡Corre!”. And so he ran, away from the immigration raid, from the chaos and noise. He ran smack into the back of a girl in a sky blue coat, knocking both of them to the ground. As he struggled to pick himself up, he said “I”'m so sorry” and held his hand out to help her. He noticed there was a large rip in his pants, and the skin was red and stinging, as if someone had slapped him. She turned around and said, “That”'s OK, I was”¦” and stopped. It was Luz, her face red, bits of snow clinging to the fake fur of her hood. “Angel”¦what are doing here?” “Luz, oh my God, it”'s good to see you. I”'ve missed you so much”. “I missed you too.” For a moment””you know that moment if you”'ve loved and been loved””the street disappeared, the people running, the loudspeakers of the police ordering people to be calm. It was as if all power was concentrated in their eyes, as if they were breathing, thinking, believing just with their eyes: young, hungry, free. “We”'ve got to get out of here!” Luz said, and began to cry. “I think they got Uncle Jaime”. Angel touched her shoulder gently, and said, “Let”'s go.” They ran down an alley, slipping on [...]

100 Year Old Church is a Treasure within 129 Year Old Legacy and 1500 Years of Welsh Culture

100 Year Old Church is a Treasure within 129 Year Old Legacy and 1500 Years of Welsh Culture

By Sue Hunter Weir Since at least the 1880s, what we now call the Phillips Neighborhood, has been home to thousands of immigrants and their families, many of whom are buried or have relatives buried, in Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery. Their contributions to the city”'s early development are among the reasons why the cemetery is on the National Register of Historic Sites (the only cemetery in Minnesota honored with that designation). Many of those buried in the cemetery, quite literally, built the city of Minneapolis. Their presence is still visible throughout the Phillips Neighborhood most notably in many of the old churches which functioned not only as places of worship but as places where the language and culture of the “old country” was celebrated and preserved. Among those buried in the cemetery are several named Evans, Hughes, Jones, Morris and Williams””most of them the children of Welsh immigrants. (If your house is 100 years old and located between 15th and 17th Avenues from Franklin Avenue to Lake Street, there”'s a good chance that someone with one of those names lived in, or built, your house). This year marks the 100th anniversary of the groundbreaking of the Welsh Church located at 2917 15th Avenue South, on the edge of the parking lot behind In the Heart of the Beast Puppet and Mask Theatre. It was the last Welsh church built in Minneapolis. From 1883 until their new Welsh Church opened its doors in 1911, the church”'s congregation met in a church located at the intersection of Franklin and 17th Ave. In a history of the church that was published in 1931, in honor of the congregation”'s 50th anniversary, William Jones noted that most of the church”'s early members “lived within walking distance of their church.” As members of the congregation moved farther south in the city, they felt the need to build a new church in “a more convenient location,” and [...]

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