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Posts Tagged ‘Layman’s Cemetery’

Bartered Health Care Fails in court

Bartered Health Care Fails in court

by Sue Hunter Weir A word of warning””don”'t write your last will and testament on wallpaper and expect it to stand up in court. That”'s especially true if you don”'t want your relatives to inherit your money. George Strebel may (or may not) have done just that, and it led to what the Minneapolis Tribune called “one of the most unusual inheritance cases ever brought into the Hennepin County Courts.” George Strebel died from heart disease on October 21, 1916. For the next eight months, his body was held in the cemetery”'s vault while county officials attempted to locate his relatives. After eight months of fruitless searching, he was finally buried in Layman”'s Cemetery. Shortly afterward, two women, who claimed to be Strebel”'s sisters, came forward. His body was exhumed and the two sisters identified Strebel”'s remains by a malformation of one of his hands. Neither of the women had seen their brother in over 30 years. Ironically, he had severed all ties with his family over what he believed to be an unfair division of his family”'s property. For the last six years of his life, Strebel had lived at the Pacific Hotel, which was located at 226 Washington Avenue North. He was in poor health much of that time and was cared for by the hotel”'s staff who he regarded as being his real family. He developed his own unique method of getting the health care that he needed--he promised those who cared for him that they would be his heirs. Unfortunately, he did it in a series of wills, naming first one person, then another. A handful of those wills survived and became evidence in probate court. If there was one thing that those who worked in the hotel agreed on, however, it was that Strebel didn”'t want his family to inherit his $6,000. (more…)

Readers may decide “The Rest of the Story” of Ruff Neff may be hopeful

Readers may decide “The Rest of the Story” of Ruff Neff may be hopeful

by Sue Hunter Weir In 1909, when she was 15 years old, Ruth Neff was arrested for indecent conduct. After that, things went straight down hill. She was sent to a reform school for a few months but her mother managed to persuade the court to let Ruth out on parole. According to her mother, Ruth had always been a difficult child. Ruth”'s parents separated shortly after she was born because, in the words of her mother, Ruth”'s father had become “more or less dissipated.” In order to support herself and her four children, Ruth”'s mother had to work. Ruth did poorly in school and often skipped class. One of her teachers described Ruth “as not quite normal mentally.” The same teacher admitted that they”'d promoted Ruth “to simply get her on in school.” Even so, Ruth never got beyond the fourth grade. (more…)

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