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Asa Clark Brown-Sawyer, Carpenter, and Veteran from the War of 1812 Seven children and three grandchildren served in Civil War Union Army

Asa Clark Brown-Sawyer, Carpenter, and Veteran from the War of 1812 Seven children and three grandchildren served in Civil War Union Army

By Sue Hunter Weir The War of 1812 is one of those subjects that most of us studied in high school but would be hard pressed to explain to anyone else. Part of the reason is that it was less of a war than a series of skirmishes that ranged from the Canadian border to the Gulf of Mexico. We might remember that the British burned the White House, and that Dolley Madison was forced to run for her life having had the presence of mind to take a painting of George Washington with her. We might also remember that Frances Scott Key was inspired to write the Star-Spangled Banner after watching the British Navy bombard Fort McHenry. During the War of 1812 many soldiers were drafted to serve in militias, and the practice of sending a substitute to serve in one”'s place was not uncommon. One such substitute was Asa Clark Brown, who fought in place of a man whose last name was Thomas, first name unknown. In September of 1813, Asa Brown enrolled in Captain Adams”' Company of the New York State Detached Artillery. He served until November 9, 1813, when he was given an honorable discharge. He married Elizabeth Reynolds sometime between 1810 and 1815. They had four children. It is likely that Elizabeth died sometime between 1822, when their last child was born, and March 8,1832, when Mr. Brown married his second wife, Eleanor Huppenan. Asa and Eleanor Brown had five sons. By 1826, Asa Brown was co-owner of a saw mill in Venango, Pennsylvania. Sometime before the 1860 federal census was taken, Asa Brown and several of his children had moved to Richfield, Minnesota. The census listed his occupation as carpenter, and his net worth as a comfortable, though not wealthy, $275. During the Civil War, seven of Asa Brown”'s sons and three of his grandsons served in the Union Army. Mr. Brown lived long enough to see all of them return unharmed. He died on March 7, 1866, from pleurisy at the age of 73 years, 4 months and 23 days.

Daughters of the War of 1812 , The Second War of Independence, will Honor Sergeant James Nettle

Daughters of the War of 1812 ,  The Second War of Independence, will Honor Sergeant James Nettle

By Sue Hunter Weir The Daughters of the War of 1812 will rededicate the marker of Sergeant James Nettle Glover, one of three confirmed War of 1812 veterans buried in Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery. The other two veterans, Asa Clark Brown and Walter P. Carpenter, will be honored in 2011 and 2012 respectively. John Carpenter, Walter”'s brother, may well turn out to be a War of 1812 veteran as well. If that turns out to be the case, four of the approximately 200 War of 1812 veterans known to have died in Minnesota will be buried in Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery. All of these veterans were interesting men, perhaps none more so than James Nettle Glover. Mr. Glover was born in Fort Tobacco, Maryland, in 1793. When the War of 1812 began, Mr. Glover enlisted; he was eventually promoted to sergeant. Following the war, Mr. Glover and all of his siblings, moved to St. Louis, Missouri. It was there that he met and married Elizabeth Dozier. One of the compensations that veterans received was 160 acres of land. Mr. Glover claimed his land and began farming. Although Missouri was admitted to the union as a slave state in 1820, Mr. Glover did not use slave laborers on his farm: all of the men who worked for him were paid for their work. In 1820, anti-slavery and pro-slavery congressmen reached an agreement under which Missouri was admitted to the union as a slave state. A deeply religious man, Mr. Glover reached the decision that he could no longer participate in slavery in any form. In 1845, he became one of several Missouri residents who pulled up stakes and moved to Grant County, Wisconsin, an area that became known as “Abolition Hollow.” Many of those who migrated brought their former slaves with them, emancipated them and helped them establish farms in the region. The area became an important stop on the Midwest”'s Underground Railroad. In their old age, James and Elizabeth Glover, moved to Minneapolis to stay with [...]

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