NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Wednesday October 20th 2021

Keep citizen journalism alive!

Donatebutton_narrow

Sections

Archives

‘Miscellany’ Archives

Kindertransport and The Story is Here at American Swedish Institute

Kindertransport and The Story is Here at American Swedish Institute

Photo story by Jessie Merriam The nationally touring exhibition, “Kindertransport – Rescuing Children on the Brink of War,” tells the story of the nations and individuals involved in the rescue effort that brought approximately 10,000 Jewish children from Nazi Germany to Great Britain and other countries,including Sweden, between 1938 and 1939 (approximately between Kristallnacht and the outbreak of war in Europe). Upstairs in the museum, the American Swedish Institute brings the story home, following three boyswho eventually came to Minnesota through the Kindertransport program,despite the US’s restrictive immigration policies at the time. The exhibit is personal--documenting the escalation of violence on the streets and in schools, tormented decisions and goodbyes, letters between children and parents, the fates of parents and remaining siblings, the ID tags worn around the necks of traveling children, stories of both difficult and caring placements abroad, and strained post-war reconnections. But it is also a story of nations and their politics around immigration, and how small groups of advocates failed to sway the US Congress into accepting children fleeing the Nazis (above the conservative Depression-era immigration quotas of the time). The consequences are palpable, and seem to reach from the past to shake us by the shoulders. “The Story is Here” exhibit ends with tributes to the present-day families and passed-down creative passions of the MinnesotanKindertransport survivors. But the poetry of Siegfried Lindenbaum, oneof these survivors, poigniantly carries the strain of incomplete belonging that immigrants still face, asking us as viewers to consider our own roles aswanderers and welcomers.

Join us!

Join us!

Bridge Fest

Bridge Fest

By CARZ NELSON Bridge Fest: Celebrating the New 24th Street Foot Bridge Musicians on the bridge Strolling on the bridgeHanging out on the bridgeTrying out the new bridgePhotographer tests the view, with a photograph of the old view to his right hanging on the new fence. The New Viewphotographs by Carz Nelson On August 19, MNDot had a party to celebrate the new 24th Street pedestrian bridge over 35W. The old bridge was removed for the 35W upgrade, which was recently completed. People in the neighborhood were significantly inconvenienced when the bridge was removed. Pedestrians faced a four-block detour to cross 35W at Franklin Avenue or 26th Street. The completion of the new bridge was an occasion to celebrate. Turns out, MNDot knows how to throw a good party. There were artists, performers, and musicians to entertain the crowd gathered on the bridge. Free ice cream was the perfect treat for a summer evening. The old bridge was popular with local photographers because it arced high in the air and provided an excellent view of the downtown skyline. The new bridge is closer to street grade. There was some concern that the new view might not make as good pictures. Many photographers showed up for Bridgefest to try out the new angle for themselves. They discovered that the new bridge is a fine place to shoot pictures of the downtown skyline after all. The celebration spilled off the bridge and into the neighborhoods as groups like Open Eye Theater and Hennepin County Historical Society featured entertainment and activities. Bridgefest recognized not only the new bridge, but also the rejoining of two neighborhoods.

October 2021

October 2021

click on the image to access the full paper:

East Phillips News

East Phillips News

click on image for full resolution pdf

Vote!

Vote!

Ventura Village News

Ventura Village News

click on image for full resolution pdf

Back to the Swale

RETURNING CHAPTER 13 By PATRICK CABELLO HANSEL Luz, Angel and little Angelito followed the garishly dressed woman through the door in the basement of the senior center. It led to a passageway that got narrower and lower as they walked. As they were about to step into near complete darkness, Angel turned and looked at Agnes, the kind elderly woman who had found them, fed them and given them hope. She seemed to shrink as they departed, and her face contorted in tears. I’m sorry. I’m so sorry: that is what Angel heard. But whether those words came from Agnes, or from the walls closing in on him, he could not say. Their journey continued for several minutes, with no light and only the raspy words of Cindy Keefe to follow. Luz knew her from the worst part of her past; a past that would not let her be; Angel had just met her, and knew that she could not be trusted. But what else could they do but follow? They emerged in the middle of an alleyway, behind a tall, wooden garage that must have once been used to keep a horse and wagon. Angel instinctively knew where they were: in the middle of the swale. Of course it was the swale, he thought. Everything is connected to the swale: my ancestors, Luz’ ancestors, our accusers. Seven years before, on Angel’s first searching, he had learned about the swale from Mr. Bussey, a teacher he had had at Roosevelt. The swale was a low spot between Bloomington and Cedar, not good for farming when farms were still here, but a good place for hiding out. Escaped slaves had passed through, refugees from the 1862 war, smugglers, women fleeing their husbands. It was a place of promise and of peril.* “Where are we?” little Angelito asked his father. Before Angel could answer, the strange woman bent down to him and said, “Why would a nice boy like you need to know that?” “How would you know what was nice or not?” Angelito asked. He slipped closer to his [...]

September 2021

September 2021

Click on the image of the front page to open the full paper as it appears in print (this may open as a new tab in your browser, or download to your computer, depending on your browser settings). All articles and photos posted individually on the website as well.

Are You Letting Expenses Rise to Meet Income?

By MARY ELLEN KALUZA I once heard the phrase: Expenses rise to meet income. "Not me!" I thought. But, to be honest, even a pathologically frugal person like me lets expenses rise with income. Case in point: For most of my life (we’re talking quite a few decades) I watched broadcast television and library videos on hand-me-down TVs. Cable was not in the budget as a single parent. After my nest emptied and I had only myself to support, I envied friends and the great stuff they were watching on internet streaming sites. So, I started to pay for streaming. But, because my TV was so old and dated, I had to move off the couch in the living room to a hard chair in front of the computer screen to watch streaming video. I was okay with that, but my cat was not. We had a lot of disagreements about what was comfortable and what wasn’t. So I finally paid money for a new TV for the first time in my life. (Don’t worry - I didn’t completely go off the rails; it is a modest TV). We were back on the couch for TV time, and harmony was restored to the household. But, of course, that meant I needed to buy other devices, like a digital antenna and some box to get the internet to my TV. More expenses. I could argue all this spending was justified to keep the cat happy, which makes my life easier. But the truth is, I didn’t need to pay for entertainment in the first place. There is still plenty to watch on broadcast TV, and my library is only two blocks away. Why wouldn’t you want to let expenses rise to meet income? Retirement. I have a cousin who always put her pay raises into her retirement account instead of spending it. Because of her diligence, she retired early with her husband and they are enjoying life very much.Unforeseen events. Nearly 70% of Americans have less than $1000 in savings. Almost a quarter don’t even have a savings account. It doesn’t take much of an emergency to put a family into a [...]

 Page 1 of 90  1  2  3  4  5 » ...  Last »