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News & Views of Phillips Since 1976
Sunday March 3rd 2024

“”¦when every leaf is a flower.”

Johannes Kulstad.  Mr. Kulstad was born in Norway in 1820 and died in Minneapolis on July 11, 1908.  He lived at 3435 Cedar Avenue.  Photo courtesy of his family. This intriguing photograph capturing the very essence of most Norwegian stereotypes is of Johannes Kulstad who was born in Norway in 1820.  He came to the U.S. in 1883 to live with his son, Ole Kulstad, in Red Wing.  He was 63 at the time and none of the censuses give an occupation so he may have been retired.  Or...he might have helped Ole, who was a tailor.  One of Ole”'s daughters was listed as a “tailoress” so it was probably a family business.  The family moved to Minneapolis sometime between 1905 and 1908 (when Johannes died).  He was living ay 3425 Cedar Avenue when he died on July 11, 1908 at 88 years of age.  He was always listed as a widower so a guesstimate is that he emigrated after his wife died back in Norway.  So far from home, he died in his new country.

Johannes Kulstad.  Mr. Kulstad was born in Norway in 1820 and died in Minneapolis on July 11, 1908.  He lived at 3435 Cedar Avenue.  Photo courtesy of his family.
This intriguing photograph capturing the very essence of most Norwegian stereotypes is of Johannes Kulstad who was born in Norway in 1820.  He came to the U.S. in 1883 to live with his son, Ole Kulstad, in Red Wing.  He was 63 at the time and none of the censuses give an occupation so he may have been retired.  Or…he might have helped Ole, who was a tailor.  One of Ole”'s daughters was listed as a “tailoress” so it was probably a family business.  The family moved to Minneapolis sometime between 1905 and 1908 (when Johannes died).  He was living ay 3425 Cedar Avenue when he died on July 11, 1908 at 88 years of age.  He was always listed as a widower so a guesstimate is that he emigrated after his wife died back in Norway.  So far from home, he died in his new country.

By Sue Hunter Weir

The leaves have started to turn.  The geese are making their annual rest stop on their way to warmer places.  By the time that you read this Friends of the Cemetery will have shown our last movie of five for the season and will have only one tour left to give.

This year, the 162nd that the Cemetery has been in existence, was a busy one.  We showed five movies, one in Spanish and two with live orchestras.  We hosted two Eagle Scout projects and an Earth Day Cemetery clean up by members of the St. Olaf Alumni Association that was organized by St. Paul”'s Church.  This year marked the 147th Memorial Day observance.  The Cemetery participated in the first Open Streets event on Lake Street.  We met and corresponded with dozens of people who have family members buried in the Cemetery.  We developed a second smartphone history hunt and a new Face-to-Face history hunt for those who prefer to leave technology behind for an hour or so.

Between now and April 15th, we”'ll be spending time reading, researching and collecting photographs.  We will start planning events for 2016 in January, and, weather permitting, tap the maple trees and make some Cemetery syrup in early spring.

You still have a few days to stop in and take in the Fall colors before they”'re gone.  And, thank you; to all of you who have supported the Cemetery in so many ways over the years.

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One Response to ““”¦when every leaf is a flower.””

  1. Kathleen Kulstad says:

    I have the original of that photo! The family moved from Red Wing to St. Paul to take advantage of broader market. Unfortunately it was about time of ready to wear suits. Ole was a tailor and ran O Kulstad and Son Tailirs in Red Wing. Marie went to St. Paul firstly did not find success in the big city

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