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Random alley news April ’22

Random alley news April ’22

By LINDSEY FENNER Allina Proposing a New 10-Story Surgical Care Center at Abbott Northwestern Hospital All Youth Programs and Sports Are Free This Summer at Phillips Parks: The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB) has made activities free for ages 17 and under in Minneapolis neighborhoods within “census-designated Areas of Concentrated Poverty (ACP).” This includes activities in East Phillips Park, Phillips Park, Peavey Park, and Stewart Park in the Phillips neighborhoods. Other area parks with waived fees for youth include: Central Gym, Elliot Park, Painter Park, Powderhorn Park, Whittier Park. The program applies to 17 parks throughout Minneapolis through at least the end of 2022. The funding for this project comes from a gradual increase in the Park Board property tax levy and City of Minneapolis allocations from the American Rescue Plan Act, the COVID-19 Stimulus funding passed by the Biden administration in 2021.  How it Works: Visit minneapolisparks.org/register to browse all MPRB programs online via the ActiveNet platform. People can also drop by or call their local recreation center to ask about upcoming programs and sign up. Youth program registration will be free for anyone with a Minneapolis address on their ActiveNet account at one of the 17 sites. Allina Proposing a New 10-Story Surgical Care Center at Abbott Northwestern Hospital: At the February 24 City of Minneapolis Planning Commission Committee of the Whole meeting, Allina presented a proposal for a new 10-story “surgical and critical care pavilion” along with changes to traffic access to the hospital campus. The new building, located in the middle of the two-block hospital campus between approximately Chicago and 10th Avenues, and 26th and 28th Streets, adds approximately 500,000 sq ft of space. This building project is in the preliminary stages of City approval. Allina will need to complete an environmental worksheet and traffic study and go through a [...]

Alley February 2021

Alley February 2021

Unfair Labor Practices strike at Abbott Northwestern Hospital on October 5 and 6.

Unfair Labor Practices strike at Abbott Northwestern Hospital on October 5 and 6.

SEIU Healthcare MN members went on a two-day Unfair Labor Practices strike at Abbott Northwestern Hospital on October 5 and 6. Striking Radiology Technologists at Abbott have been bargaining with Allina Health since May. Among other issues, SEIU members are fighting for the same COVID-19 quarantine pay and benefits as other workers at Allina.  Photo Courtesy of SEIU Healthcare MN

The Backyard Initiative: What It Is and Why It Exists

The Backyard Initiative: What It Is and Why It Exists

The Backyard Initiative is a dynamic partnership between Allina Health and its neighbors to improve health and health care in the seven communities immediately surrounding Allina Commons, Abbott Northwestern Hospital and the Phillips Eye Institute. The Backyard Initiative supports efforts to strengthen community health by empowering residents to draw upon their own knowledge, skills, and cultural values to care for themselves, their families, and their neighbors. Research shows that social conditions”“ including isolation and a lack of social support ”“ have a profound impact on our health. By partnering the expertise and resources of health care institutions with the wisdom and experience of residents, The Backyard Initiative is exploring a new dimension to a health care system that will focus on promoting health in addition to treating sickness. Beginning in 2008, Allina partnered with the Cultural Wellness Center, a community nonprofit organization in South Minneapolis, to facilitate the community engagement process. The Cultural Wellness Center has a long history of engaging community residents to improve health through self-study, surfacing and producing knowledge, cross-cultural knowledge exchange, and relationship building. Early in the process, the CWC led a process that engaged residents in developing a definition of health, a definition that became the foundation for The Backyard Initiative.

The next NEW PWW Photo will appear in January 2012 Including THE BEST EVER PWW RESPONSE

The one and only correct contestant for the November Phillips What Where was by Matthew Roed.  We have never had such a thorough answer along with additional commentary about Phillips.  Here it is in its entirety:  Dear Editor: My name is Matthew Roed and I live in Golden Valley and work at Abbott Northwestern Hospital where I read the Alley in the cafeteria after working night shift at Sister Kenny Institute as a Registered Nurse. I would like to submit my guess for the Phillips What Where for November 2011. Since I work in this neighborhood, I felt that I should know why it was so named and who inspired the naming. So I decided to figure it out... (more…)

ReUse Center Closed after 15 years

ReUse Center Closed after 15 years

by Harvey Winje The Reuse Center in Phillips closed on Dec. 11th, held a one week on-line auction, gave away the remains, and was ended by Dec 31st. The Mpls. Reuse Center, which began as the first retail sales store selling reusable building materials in an urban shopping center in the United States, opened at the Hi-Lake Shopping Center on October 15, 1995. An Elder from Little Earth, Gladys Cain, opened the program with a traditional American Indian smudging and blessing followed with remarks by Senator Paul Wellstone, David Morris, city, county and state political representatives, environmental activists and community residents. This event topped off the culmination of 2 years of writing a business plan, fundraising, and conducting a pilot project in local warehouses in Phillips. The ReUse Center did not originate from an idea of a few nor did it come from an entirely environmental perspective. Instead, it arose out of a controversy between Hennepin County and the City of Minneapolis versus the Phillips Community about clearing land of 27 homes and 5 businesses where a state of the art, garbage transfer station was to be built costing 10 million dollars. A diverse community of homeowners and renters, seasoned activists and passionate mothers decried that their children were worth more than what a garbage station represented and that together, they would fight to prevent this from occurring. The garbage transfer station was not built in Phillips. In fact, it was not built anywhere. Instead, the community did the research to discover that they could save Hennepin County these many millions of dollars with a relatively simple remodeling to the downtown incinerator to accept the existing garbage trucks to operate efficiently. This organizing effort became the catalyst for The Green Institute. (more…)

Portico Healthnet, Health Coverage That Is Much Needed

By Raymond Jackson At a time when many are still waiting anxiously for health reform information from our government, the need toll continues to rise. The free clinics are bulging at the seams as too, too many are running out of resources, and simply losing hope. Portico Health Net continues to fill the ever expanding void that many families face. They have served the people of the Phillips Community, the most populated neighborhoods in The Twin Cities, in ways that are actually saving lives, minds, bodies and souls. Working with a group of persons that do not hesitate to show their commitment, concern and dedication to those in need of affordable and reliable health care, Portico Health Net continues to help simplify and meet those needs, not just for Phillips Neighborhood residents, but to the entire state of Minnesota. By working not just with Abbott-Northwestern hospital, located here in Phillips, but 12 other hospitals located in Minnesota, Portico is making a difference with their Safety Net Coverage and Preventative Care Needs programs most particularly. (more…)

Women & Children First

Women & Children First

by Sue Hunter Weir When Northwestern Hospital for Women and Children opened its doors in December 1882, its board members had lofty goals but virtually no money. Their goal was to create an “organization, charitable in its nature, for the care of indigent women and children””for the training of nurses for the sick, and also for the drilling of domestic servants.” Or, as one member described it, the hospital was “Woman”'s work for women.” They rented a house at 2504 Fourth Avenue South that could house up to ten patients plus the staff needed to care for them. Rent was $25.00 a month for a hospital that had no indoor plumbing and was lit only by kerosene lamps. Despite the lack of amenities, patients were lining up for beds before the hospital opened. Furnishings, food, bedding and used clothing were donated. Three of the wealthiest donors each made a commitment to give $250 a year to cover the cost of operating one of the hospitals three “free beds.” Northwestern”'s Board of Trustees filed Articles of Incorporation the following year. The articles stated that only women and children would be treated at the hospital and that all of the staff, both medical and domestic, would be women. Priority was given to indigent women, followed by women who were able to pay for a small portion of their care and, lastly, by women able to pay the full cost of their treatment. In the hospital”'s first year of operation, 97 patients were admitted for treatment; of those 74 were treated for free. Northwestern”'s nursing school, named the Harriet Walker Training School for Nurses, after the first president of the hospital”'s Board of Trustees, was an important component of the hospital”'s service mission. The earliest students spent a year to a year and a-half learning their profession. Some of their instruction occurred in the classroom but much of it occurred on the job under the supervision of the [...]

Interview with Former Allina CEO Gordon Sprenger

Interview by Harvey Winje The Alley Newspaper”'s Editor, Harvey Winje, recently interviewed Gordon Sprenger, the former Abbott Northwestern Hospital President and CEO of Allina. The purpose of the interview was to talk with Sprenger about earlier attempts of Abbott Northwestern Hospital to develop ongoing, intentional relationships with the community. The expressed purpose was the mutually beneficial coexistence of the institution and urban community in a time of rapid evolution beginning in the 1970”'s within the health care industry. Gordon Sprenger”'s first job within the health care industry began after getting a masters degree in Hospital Administration from the University of MN in 1961, a hospital residency in Milwaukee, WI, and 3 years of running a hospital in San Francisco while in the Air Force. His first job at Northwestern Hospital was in 1967 as Assistant Administrator. He became the Administrator shortly after Abbott and Northwestern Hospitals merged administratively in 1970. He was President/CEO of Abbott Northwestern (A/N) from 1971 to 1995. He served simultaneously as President/CEO of the newly formed LifeSpan (forerunner to HealthSpan), and eventually, Allina, until 2002. During his time at Abbott Northwestern, Gordon Sprenger began a Community Advisory Committee in 1969. This group of neighbors and hospital leaders met monthly. Sprenger and the Board Chair of the Hospital also met quarterly with the Chair of the CAC Committee. Harvey Winje served as the Chair of the CAC for six years from 1981 to 1987. The CAC was disbanded much to the immediate neighborhood”'s dismay in 2008. ALLEY: Why did Abbott Hospital and Northwestern Hospital merge? Gordon Sprenger: “The increased sophistication of healthcare personnel and the technology that was emerging necessitated larger facilities with more ability to absorb the changes practically and financially. It was a tumultuous time internally because not everyone [...]

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