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News & Views of Phillips Since 1976
Monday May 20th 2024

Posts Tagged ‘Pedestrian Bridge’

Bridge Fest

Bridge Fest

By CARZ NELSON Bridge Fest: Celebrating the New 24th Street Foot Bridge Musicians on the bridge Strolling on the bridgeHanging out on the bridgeTrying out the new bridgePhotographer tests the view, with a photograph of the old view to his right hanging on the new fence. The New Viewphotographs by Carz Nelson On August 19, MNDot had a party to celebrate the new 24th Street pedestrian bridge over 35W. The old bridge was removed for the 35W upgrade, which was recently completed. People in the neighborhood were significantly inconvenienced when the bridge was removed. Pedestrians faced a four-block detour to cross 35W at Franklin Avenue or 26th Street. The completion of the new bridge was an occasion to celebrate. Turns out, MNDot knows how to throw a good party. There were artists, performers, and musicians to entertain the crowd gathered on the bridge. Free ice cream was the perfect treat for a summer evening. The old bridge was popular with local photographers [...]

A highway divided, but it didn”'t conquer. What is a Bridge? New community project in Phillips West

A highway divided, but it didn”'t conquer. What is a Bridge?  New community project in Phillips West

by Dallas Johnson A bridge is more than a connection between two places. Yes, our very own 24th St pedestrian bridge across 35W connects our neighborhood to Whittier. But did you know it”'s also a testament to community activism? You are invited to help breathe new life into the incredible story of our bridge. What”'s the story? When the imminent installation of 35W was announced in 1962, the affected community fervently protested but was summarily dismissed. According to a Minneapolis Tribune article by Ted Kolderie, “Minneapolis finds itself”¦facing another impossible choice between accepting a highway plan to which a substantial segment of the community objects, and delaying the program again for another study”. Despite the resistance of the (largely minority) community, the freeway project was completed in November, 1967. Residents, who”'d been forced to move, experienced extreme hardship in their protracted effort to restart their [...]

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