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Kids Deserve a Shot

Kids Deserve a Shot

KIDS DESERVE A SHOT! MINNESOTA COVID 19 RESPONSE Families get $200 for getting their child 5-11 years old vaccinated. Minnesota families who get their child 5-11 years old fully vaccinated in January and February can get a $200 Visa gift card. Parents/Guardians can register their 5- to 11-year-old once they have completed their two-dose series.  Registration opens 10:00 a.m. January 24, 2022. Registration closes 11:59 p.m. February 28, 2022. Register here: https://mn.gov/covid19/vaccine/vaccine-rewards/kids-deserve-a-shot/ Eligibility Requirements:   Minnesotans must be: at least 5 years old at the time of one or both shots and 11 or younger at the time of their first shot.  Minnesotans 5-11 years old must receive both their first and second doses between January 1, 2022 and February 28, 2022.  Minnesota families are able to receive one $200 Visa gift card per each eligible 5- to-11-year-old fully vaccinated between January 1 — February 28.  Las familias pueden obtener $200 por vacunar a sus niños entre 5 y 11 años. Las familias de Minnesota que vacunen completamente a sus niños entre 5 y 11 años en enero y febrero pueden obtener una tarjeta de regalo Visa por un valor de $200.Los padres o tutores legales pueden registrar a sus hijos de entre 5 y 11 años una vez que hayan completado su serie de dos dosis.  La inscripción se inicia el 24 de enero de 2022 a las 10:00 a. m. La inscripción finaliza el 28 de febrero de 2022 a las 11:59 p. m. https://mn.gov/covid19/vaccine/vaccine-rewards/kids-deserve-a-shot/ Requisitos para la inscripción:  Los residentes de Minnesota deben:tener al menos 5 años al momento de recibir una o ambas dosisy tener 11 años o menos al momento de recibir su primera dosis. Los residentes de Minnesota que tengan entre 5 y 11 años deberán haber recibido la serie completa de dos dosis entre el 1 de enero y el 28 de [...]

COVID-19 Back to School

COVID-19 Back to School

By LINDSEY FENNER It”™s September, which means kids are back in school! But with the Delta variant spreading in MN, and kids under 12 unable to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, sending your kids to school this year might feel really scary. Although the new variant is much more contagious, the good news is that all of the COVID-19 precautions we”™re already using are still effective against the Delta variant. We have so many tools to use! But it is important to remember that there isn”™t just one thing to do; we need to layer up these interventions to keep our kids healthy. Read your school”™s COVID-19 plan. Ask questions if there”™s something you don”™t understand.Surround your kids under 12 with vaccinated adults. Every vaccinated person helps to weaken the chain of transmission, and protect unvaccinated folks.Get your kids over 12 vaccinated. Although they are less likely to get severely ill, they can still get sick, and they can certainly spread COVID-19 to vulnerable loved ones, and unvaccinated younger siblings.Reduce community risk outside of school. Preventing spread outside of school prevents spread inside of school. This might look like: wearing a mask in all indoor settings outside of the home, seeing a smaller group of friends, doing fewer extracurricular activities.Good ventilation is essential. If your school isn”™t communicating with families about how they are improving ventilation in the classroom, ask about it!Get tested regularly: The CDC recommends students get tested at least weekly, even if they don”™t have symptoms. Talk to your school nurse about what testing is available through the school. The State of MN offers FREE, at-home testing: https://learn.vaulthealth.com/state-of-minnesota/Masks are recommended in schools, regardless of vaccination status. Try to get the best-fitting, highest filtration mask your child can comfortably wear for long periods [...]

Thanks to Vaccines, the Golden Age for Children’s Health is Now

Thanks to Vaccines, the Golden Age for Children’s Health is Now

Tales from Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery 188th in a series By SUE HUNTER WEIR A grandmother tends the graves of two of her grandchildren. Two year-old Freda Aubele died on December 2, 1915. Her six-year-old sister, Annie, died the following day. Their wooden cross is gone but family members placed a new marker on their grave in 2009.Photo credit: Aubele Family The Washington Post recently ran the following headline: “Coronavirus infections dropping where people are vaccinated and rising where they are not.” The story was news only because it specifically referred to the novel coronavirus.  We have known for a long time that the numbers of illnesses and deaths decrease when people, especially children, are vaccinated. There are several  diseases that were once among the leading killers of young children, which have been either nearly or entirely eradicated in the United States. Since the arrival of vaccines, we no longer have to worry about measles, mumps, rubella, polio, diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, or smallpox. We have much to be thankful for, but the World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have issued some alarming warnings about the current state of those diseases. According to The Washington Post, in 2019, the number of people who died from measles was at a 23-year-high, having increased 50 percent in only three years. There has been a 60 percent decrease in the number of two- to six-year-olds who receive the DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis) vaccine, and a decrease of 63 percent in the number of two- to eight-year-olds who receive the MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine. How alarmed should we be? Looking back at the number of deaths caused by just one of the diseases mentioned above, in only one of the city”™s cemeteries, the answer is: very. Among the people buried in Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery between 1862 and 1918, 812 of them died of [...]

How We Get to the End (because we’re not there yet)

TIPS FROM A COVID-19 CASE INVESTIGATOR By LINDSEY FENNER Now that COVID vaccines are much more easily available in Minnesota, we have reached what is perhaps the hardest part of this enormous vaccination task: reaching the folks who waited or haven”™t quite made up their minds or still have questions. And as much information as any government public health official can send out in the world, YOU can make a difference by having conversations with loved ones about getting vaccinated. These conversations might be difficult. And it will likely take more than one conversation. But this is how we get to the end of the pandemic.  Some tips for having these difficult yet crucial discussions Listen with empathy and without judgement: These vaccines are new. There is so much information and misinformation about them, it can be overwhelming. It is understandable that people have questions or anxiety about getting their shot. Give folks space to talk it out. Ask open-ended questions: This helps keep the conversation going, and helps you understand what your friend or relative is concerned about. Share information and resources (but ask permission first): There are many good informational resources about the vaccine. Just try not to SPAM them with information!Help them find their reason why: People who get vaccinated do it for different reasons. You could share why you got vaccinated to help them think about it, or talk about what you both could do together once everyone is vaccinated.Remove barriers: Sometimes people just need a little logistical support, like help finding an appointment or vaccination event, transportation to the vaccination site, help with caregiving if they have side effects, or just someone familiar to accompany them at the appointment. We need  to acknowledge that there are so many structural reasons that have prevented people from getting vaccinated, like lack of access to healthcare, paid time off, or [...]

Can You Say “Tuskegee Experiment?

Can You Say “Tuskegee Experiment?

SOMETHING I SAID By DWIGHT HOBBES You couldn”™t throw the COVID-19 or any other number vaccine on me in a bucket of water. Can you say Tuskegee Experiment? The research for which African Americans were used by the United States Public Health Service as lab rats to explore the effects of syphilis. That was far back as 1932 but medical science hasn”™t progressed so far today that we don”™t have one Dr. Jean-Paul Mira, chief of intensive care at the Cochin Hospital in Paris, France. In April of last year, he asked the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research director Camille Locht on French television channel LCI, “Shouldn”™t we be doing this study in Africa where there are no masks, no treatment, no intensive care, a little bit like we did in certain AIDS studies or with prostitutes?” Locht responded, “You are right. We are thinking of a parallel study in Africa to use approach with the BCG placebos.” Placebos. The same ruse this government perpetrated, in a study that went on until 1972, years with not one infected patient being treated with penicillin despite that by 1947, the antibiotic was widely available and had become the standard treatment for the disease. The program killed 128 of its 600 participants letting them die from syphilis or related complications. Mira and Locht might well have got away with similarly disregarding black humanity but for the outrage on social media condemning their comments. There is no telling how many men, women and children would have died a miserable death as Mira and Locht blithely went on about their business. Admittedly, there”™s no evidence that US doctors will follow that lead. No smoking gun. On the other hand, there”™s also no reason to believe they won”™t, the medical profession conducting another Tuskegee-style experiment and simply being smarter about keeping it under their hats. Time [...]

Community Wellness Center

Community Wellness Center

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