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Tuesday September 17th 2019

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Semilla Center for Healing: Peace Lantern Procession on Sept. 21

By Patrick Cabello Hansel

Saturday, Sept. 21 is International Peace Day. It was established in 1981 by a unanimous vote at the United Nations, with a hope that all nations would recommit to building a Culture of Peace.

Without a doubt, our neighborhood and our world are in desperate need of recommitting to building peace. 

The Semilla Center for Healing and the Arts are hosting a Peace Lantern Procession on Sept. 21, at 7 p.m., at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church. We will walk with lanterns to various spots in the community that are crying out for peace. The event will also feature music, interactive activities, food and the projection of Semilla’s Youth Photography Show.

A special lantern making workshop will be held at St. Paul’s on Sunday, Sept.8 at 1:30 p.m. St. Paul’s is located at 2742 15th Ave. S. For more information, call 612-724-3862 or e-mail: semillacenter@gmail.com

THE PHOENIX RISES!

Want to see your work in print? Consider submitting to our neighborhood’s literary magazine The Phoenix of Phillips. Writers of any age are welcome to submit for this fall’s issue, whose theme is “Hope.” There will be a special poetry contest for youth, announced in October. Writers can send their poems, short stories and essays to semillacenter@gmail.com. 

The Phoenix of Phillips is a project of the Semilla Center for Healing and the Arts at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church. Check out our website at www.semillacenter.org, like us on Face Book: Semilla Center, and follow us on Twitter and Instagram: @semillacenter.

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Backyard Community Health Hub September 2019

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EPIC September 2019

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Midtown Phillips September 2019

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Ventura Village September 2019

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Do you like newspapers? 

Better yet, do you read The Alley Newspaper and want to it to improve, grow or change? 

JOIN the Editorial Leadership Team of Alley Communications and work with the Alley’s Coordinator to lift the many voices of the Phillips Community and how to get them represented within the pages of The Alley Newspaper!

Email AlleyWinje@aol.com or call Harvey at 612-990-4022 for more info and next steps.

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Movie corner: I had a good time watching ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’

By HOWARD McQUITTER II

Howard McQuitter

oldschoolmovies.wordpress.com

howardmcquitter68@gmail.com

Drama/Comedy

The year is 1969. Vietnam, hippies, Black Panthers, marijuana, campus demonstrations, Stonewall riots, robust middle-class, man landing on the moon, white flight anywhere but where the blacks, soul music and Afros. Republican President Richard Nixon’s first term telling the American people to stay clear of the leftists on American campuses. Pope Paul VI declares an ersatz new liturgy (mostly in vernacular languages) for the Catholic Church. A historical music event called Woodstock drawing thousands of youth to upper state New York to hear the best of rock- country- soul music.

Director Quentin Tarantino brings authenticity to the year 1969, in his ninth installment “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.” It’s summer in Tarantino’s Hollywood starting with an aging television and film star Rick Dalton (Leonardo Di Capri) is rapidly becoming a has-been Western television star. It seems his great success in the once popular television Western “Bounty Law” is now just re-runs. Dalton, though, still has the appetite to get his mojo back and he asks for advice from producer Marvin Schwarzs (Al Pacino) who tells him to go to Italy to act in Spaghetti Westerns. He takes the producer’s advice acting in several Westerns there and when he returns to California he has a bride on his arm. As for Rick’s buddy, Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt) who operates as his stunt double artist, chauffeur, handyman and soon, finds himself with little work in the industry, too.Cliff’s main problem is the studios have shunned him because responsible for his wife’s murder.

To keep a cash flow going, Cliff works as Rick’s chauffeur plus they both hang out at Rick’s posh crib on Cielo Drive. It so happens he lives next door to Roman Polanski (Rafal Zawierucha) and his wife Sharon Tate (Margot Robbie), an upcoming actress who just acted in her latest movie “The Wrecking Crew,” starring with Dean Martin. Charming, I guess, two fictional characters Rick and Cliff and, on the other side, two real characters Roman and Sharon. Anyway what a treat!

The conversation between child-actor Trudi (Julia Butters) and her co-star Rick on set before the cameras roll is one of the most memorable ones in Tarantino’s ninth film that is rich with dialogue anyway.

I also think of the hippie girl, Pussycat (Margaret Qualley), Rick picks up to the Spahn Ranch – at one time a Western movie set – is now a commune of Charlie Manson (Damon Herriman) followers, eerie characters, some of his clan go on to murder Sharon Tate (she’s pregnant) and five adults in all.

The Manson character appears only once, but Sharon Tate character is seen several times saying relatively little. She didn’t need a lot to say it’s her presence that proves strong. She stops in at a theater (only 75 cents) where a movie with her and Dean Martin appear together. She’s happy with her life and career; she glows, for me, Mrs. Tate is the sympathetic character, the one (I’ll never forget, I’m 21 years old at the time) smells success before fate’s curtain comes down.

The chemistry between Leonardo Di Caprio and Brad Pitt is terrific. At a party somewhere in Hollywood women in go go boots and men in bell-bottom pants dance away by a swimming pool. Who shows up but Mama Cass from the rock group the Mamas & the Papas. Although there’s Tarantino’s moments of violence, it’s less of it than in his films such as in “Inglourious Basterds”(2009),”Django Unchained” (2012) and Kill Bill (2003, 2004, respectively). I honestly say I had a good, good time watching “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.”

Cast: Leonardo Di Caprio (Rick Dalton), Brad Pitt (Cliff), Margot Robbie (Sharon Tate), Luke Perry (Wayne Maunder), Dakota Fanning (Squeaky Fromme), Al Pacino (Marvin Schwarzs), Margaret Qualley (Pussycat), Timothy Olphant (James Stacy), Damon Lewis (Steve Mc Queen), Kurt Russell (Randy), Emile Hirsch (Jay Sebring), Bruce Dern (George Spahn), Rafal Zawierucha ( Roman Polanski), Damon Herriman (Charles Manson), Dreama Walker (Connie Stevens), Sydney Sweeney (Snake), Julia Butters (Trudi), Mike Moh (Bruce Lee). Director:  Quentin Tarantino. Cinematography: Robert Richardson.

Running time: 159 minutes. (R)

The music of the 1960s is plentiful in “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.” The music scholars are Holly Adams, Mary Ramos, Gary Raymond and Jim Schultz. Some of the songs: The Mamas & the Papas, “Straight Shooter”(1966); Vanilla Fudge, “You Keep Me Hangin’ On” (1967); Neil Diamond, “Brother Love’s Traveling Salvation Show” (1969); Willie Mitchell, “Soul Serenada”(1968); Aretha Franklin, “The House That Jack Built” (1968); Deep Purple,”Hush” (1968); Neal Hefti,”Batman Theme” (1966); Paul Revere & the Railders, “Hungry” (1966); The Rolling Stones,”Out of Time” (1966); Otis Redding, “Can’t Turn You Lose ”(1967); Simon & Garfunkel, “Mrs. Robinson” (1968); Dee Clark,”Hey Little Girl” (1959); and more…

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MPRB shuts down Nokomis Beach after confirmed cases of E. coli

Disease investigators at the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) have  identified a total of 49 people so far who became ill with diarrhea after swimming at Lake Nokomis. The total includes the three initial lab-confirmed cases of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) announced Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2019.

The cases include both children and adults, with about 20% of cases younger than 10 years old. In all cases, people became ill after swimming at the lake between July 16 and Aug. 11. No one has been hospitalized.

Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB) officials said the Nokomis beaches will remain closed for the rest of the swimming season out of an abundance of caution. Health officials said they would need to see no illnesses reported for at least 16 days (two incubation periods of 8 days) before they could say there was no longer a risk of STEC spreading through water at the beaches.

Anyone who is experiencing symptoms of STEC infection – diarrhea (often bloody), stomach cramps, no or low-grade fever – should see a health care provider.

Health officials remind all Minnesotans that anyone who has diarrhea should not go swimming in any body of water.

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Peace House community: They aren’t just ‘The Homeless’

By Marti Malby

“The Homeless,” a title that should only describe a person’s living situation, but often describes so much more. 

On the one hand, being part of the homeless population automatically means sleep deprivation, instability, the daily challenge of finding what you need and so much more. 

Unfortunately, that is only the objective side of homelessness, the things that can be observed and measured. There’s also a subjective side that can be even more destructive.

Sociologists and others talk about “Labeling Theory” which states among other things that the label a society places on a group within society becomes a shorthand for and an oversimplification of everyone in that group. When someone becomes part of “The Homeless,” that person finds that society no longer sees them as an individual. Instead, they are now simply part of a mass with no identity of their own. Worse yet, because of American culture’s emphasis on individual responsibility and tendency to downplay individual circumstances, those who end up homeless for whatever reason also find themselves judged by society for their situation. Worst of all, because the majority of the homeless in the U.S. grew up here, they share this cultural outlook, blaming themselves for being homeless and forgetting who they are as individuals.

Among all the other problems the homeless face, the emotional toll of being a nameless, faceless “homeless” is one of the worst. Even as I write this article, I know the current trend among social service providers is to talk about “those who are experiencing homeless” as a way of avoiding the dehumanization of slapping a label on an entire group. But even if I never applied the word homeless to any one individual, it would not change the dynamic of how our minds work.

When most of us see a “homeless” person, that is all we see. As Labeling Theory applied to homelessness explains: “One goes, often quite suddenly, from being a person with a set of socially acceptable identities, to being “homeless”, an identity that trumps, if not obliterates, all others.” (At Home of the Street: People, Poverty and the Hidden Culture of Homelessness) 

On seeing a homeless individual, people rarely see a great musician, painter, mathematician, theologian, dedicated volunteer or any other aspect of that person’s life. And yet so often they think they know that person’s story, or at least enough of it to judge them or feel pity for them.

Just for fun, do a search of “Famous homeless people” and see who comes up. As you look at the list, ask yourself, “The last time I saw a panhandler, did I think they might:

• Revolutionize world technology, as Steve Jobs did

• Win an Oscar, as Halle Berry did

• Change political discourse across the world, as George Orwell did

• Become a world-renown singer, actress, writer and activist as Eartha Kitt did?”

All of this to say that the homeless are not just “The Homeless.” They are individuals who each took their own path to where they are now and will each take their own path to whatever comes next. Each one is a blessed individual with their own story, their own strengths and their own struggles. 

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Raise Your Voice: The world within us

By PETER MOLENAAR

Peter Molenaar

From the passenger side window of the adjacent vehicle, an elder Native man called out: “Hey! Where are you from?” At the time, I was fetching 30 Alley papers for deposit at the Native American Community Clinic, after having dropped 30 at the Ancient Traders Market. Detecting the sleight of hand humor, I quickly decided not to delineate my four original nations of northern Europe. So, I responded, “I grew up in Cannon Falls, Minn., if that’s what you mean.” Then to clarify, “It’s upstream from Prairie Island on the Cannon River.” In the span of about 15 seconds, the elder Ojibwe pondered the not-so-ancient conflict with the Dakota, then registered delight that a white man would place his origin relative to Native Americans.

Note: The “cannon” of Cannon Falls is an English mumble of the French word for canoe.

Then a Somali woman walked between us. He quipped, “What do you think of all the tents (!) around here?” My instant response: “Ho, friend, I am not a Trump supporter and you know what he wants to do.” He responded, “Yeah, send them back!” I countered to the effect: who will the frenzied white man turn on when he’s done doing that? My new friend thanked me and promised to carry the thought home.

Back to the task….

I was pressed because four days of distribution had been lost to a hospital bed at Abbott Northwestern. The doctors called it a “spontaneous” pneumothorax (bubble on the chest). Spontaneous? More likely, it was in consequence to 35 years of breathing silica dust at Smith Foundry.

Meditations….

First night: IV in left-hand vein, 10 inch tube in right upper chest (to suck out the bubble and reinflate lung), urinal on the floor (Oops!), call button dangling somewhere… an hour passed. Help! The tardy nurse knelt to her knees and was forever forgiven.

It is natural for a man to feel love for all his nurses. Moreover, for a retired industrial worker, it was natural to be respectful and uplifting to the entire cast. True, to my eye, it was unusual to experience such as stratified workforce (with separate unions for the various classifications). Nonetheless, what a splendid privilege to be served by all races and peoples from all over the world.

From each according to their ability, to each according to their work (not a “nation” where 60% of all wealth is inherited)… such is the socialist principle.

Speaking of the alluded to industrial form of unionism (one union under the roof), the United Steelworkers of America recently held their civil rights conference here. Founded in no small measure by the “Reds”, this union’s doors were open from the get-go to anyone willing to work. The Black/Brown/White formation included a pink-haired couple holding hands. We all marched from the Marriott Hotel to City Hall, chanting “Immigrants are welcome here!” and singing new words to some childhood melody: We will change the world forever, and ever, and ever.

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