NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Monday August 21st 2017

Keep citizen journalism alive!

Donatebutton_narrow

Archives

OPEN STREETS MINNEAPOLIS 2017 – EAST LAKE STREET STYLE

No turning back at Cedar and Lake TW

Open Streets Minneapolis in year 6 brings together community groups and local businesses to temporarily close major thoroughfares to car traffic, and open them up for people walking, biking, skating, and playing.  Open Streets gives residents an opportunity to explore their neighborhood and local businesses in a safe, fun, and family-friendly way. It encourages the use of active transportation and healthy living, and has a goal of giving residents an opportunity to rethink our streets as public space.

Open Streets events take place in all quadrants of the City and Downtown and is an initiative of Our Streets Mpls. (formerly the Mpls. Bicycle Coalition), presented by the Center for Prevention at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of MN & co-sponsored by the City of Mpls.

OPEN STREETS happened on East Lake Street July 23, 11 AM to 5PM from Elliot Avenue to Minnehaha Avenue and down Minnehaha.  If you were among the hundreds walking,   biking, or skateboarding, you may have seen some of these views pictured below amongst thousands of other scenes without vehicular traffic on Lake Street—The Great Street—same as State Highway #7.

Photo Credit Key: TH-Talia Hansel, MM-Maggie Moran, PCH-Patrick Cabello Hansel, SG-Susan Gust, TW-Tim Will, StP K-ST. Paul Kubb Society

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

¡Agua es Vida! Water is Life!

BY TALIA HANSEL

The Young Leaders Program of St. Paul’s Church and the Semilla Center for Healing and the Arts have been helping protect the Mississippi Watershed this summer in various ways:

  • Planting native plants on boulevards, to capture storm water runoff
  • Mulching gardens to keep moisture in vegetable beds
  • Educating children and adults about how to care for the watershed

We have started a campaign called “Take the Pledge”.  The pledge has three simple commitments:

  • I will drink water from the tap instead of buying bottled water.  (Bottled water is pretty much the same as tap water.  Some tap water sold is taken from deep in the earth, and has lowered the level of important aquifers.  Plus Minneapolis tap water is clean and safe)
  • I will clean up my street with my neighbors once a month. (Remember, everything that washes into storm sewers from our streets goes untreated into the river.
  • I will learn more about how I can care for our Mississippi Watershed at https://mwmo.org/learn/

There are many other ways to conserve water, such as not mowing your lawn short, and capturing rainwater off your house or garage.  If you are interested in learning more or becoming active in helping our watershed, call 612-724-3862 or e-mail semillacenter@gmail.com.  And follow us on Twitter and Instagram: @semillacenter

Funding for this project was provided by the Mississippi Watershed Management Organization.

Talia Hansel, Community Ambassador for Young Leaders

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Why walk?

By the Phillips Wellness 50+ Team

Walking in one of the easiest ways to increase physical activity and improve your health. Almost anyone can walk, it can be done anywhere and it doesn’t cost a cent.

  • Walking provides all sorts of benefits, including:
  • Lowering blood pressure
  • Reducing weight
  • Preventing onset of diabetes
  • Improving memory
  • Here are tips to help you stay safe on your walks:
  • Cross streets at crosswalks. Better yet, cross at corners with traffic signals.
  • Wear bright color clothing to be sure that you can be seen. Never assume a driver sees you crossing the street. Try to make eye contact with drivers as they approach.
  • Walk on sidewalks whenever possible. Keep an eye out for uneven surfaces that can be hazards for falling.
  • Wear good quality shoes. Look for shoes that have a thick sole, a wide base, closed back and good arch support.
  • Carry your ID and emergency contact information.

Phillips Wellness 50+ invites you to join us for a weekly group walk. Meet us in the lobbies of Ebenezer Park Apartments and Ebenezer Tower every Tuesday night at 6:00 P.M.

Phillips Wellness 50+ is an initiative to increase health and well-being, by and for people in the Phillips neighborhood. Contact Donna Nordin at 612-741-5180 or dnordin2@comcast.net for information.

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Will Another Important Building Be Demolished by Children’s MN?

BY HARVEY WINJE

“In 1916, the cornerstone was laid for the Messiah Lutheran Church at the intersection of East 25th Street and Columbus Avenue in South Minneapolis. It was designed by Harry Wild Jones, a leading Minneapolis architect.

“Today, the two-story red brick Gothic Revival structure rests comfortably within this mildly compact urban environment and is still serving its original religious purpose though no longer for a Lutheran congregation which began In service to a Northern European immigrant community. Now the building hosts Mennonite and Latino immigrant congregations.” (see Harry Wild Jones, Architect Messiah Lutheran Church: Deserving Historic Preservation” by Bob Roscoe The Alley Newspaper, April 2017, pg. 6)

If Children’s Hospitals MN fulfills their plans, that Sanctuary will soon not be there. The block of Phillips Community bordered by Chicago and Columbus Avenues and East 25th and 26th Streets was devastated a decade ago by the surreptitious purchase and land clearing by Children’s MN.  Twenty-six homes, a church, and an automobile service station were eliminated in order to build a 700 car parking ramp and a building for clinics.

This demolition was in direct violation of the signed 14 block Land-Use Agreement between the Phillips Community and Allina Health, Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Phillips Eye Institute, Children’s MN and their successors. The block that was demolished, Block 5, was described as follows in the Land-Use agreement: “This block contains a desirable level of mixed use commercial and residential that should be maintained. Keep up appearance and rehab buildings as necessary.

The only buildings escaping that major development in 2006 were Messiah Church and the 95’ long store-front building at the corner of 25th and Chicago Ave., originally built by Dr. O.A.Olson, who lived at 2516 Chicago Avenue.  The stores burned soon after the initial land purchase by Children’s MN and was demolished.  Now only the 100-year old Messiah Church Sanctuary remains.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Hospital land grab angers Phillips residents

By Julie Miller;* The Alley Newspaper  May 25, 2006

If it would wreck your whole day to come home from work and discover your house was gone, then you need to read this story, because it could happen to you! This is real. It is not a test. It is not science fiction and you have not just entered the Twilight Zone. You have entered the Lifesciences Corridor, another dimension where homes are dispensable, parking ramps are the future, and hospitals can go from “good neighbor” to “perpetrator” in the blink of an eye.

Don’t take my word for it folks, take a walk or drive around the 2500 block of Chicago Ave. and you will see what the future has in store for you. The once stately and solid Victorian houses are gone now—nothing but a memory and a flat place in the dirt. This is the awful truth. It is not a cruel hoax, a bad joke or a dream from which you can awaken to find a world that still makes sense. This ain’t no disco, fellow citizens, and we’re definitely not in Kansas anymore. Who needs the excitement of reality TV when we all live in an endangered environment? “Survivor: Phillips Neighborhood” is filming at a block near you.

This is a story about how a corporation can turn a neighborhood into a parking lot in less time than it takes KFC to rustle up a bucket of extra crispy. A story of how a city block in Phillips West came to be destroyed by Children’s Hospital without the consent of the neighbors or the neighborhood organization. How Children’s Hospital broke a formal, solemn and binding covenant with the residents of our block and community, and placed 13 more blocks at risk. How the neighbors didn’t learn of Children’s impending encroachment until the hospital already had control of most of the homes through their intermediary, developer Jim Dowds (aka Prima Land Inc.). It’s the story of how we left for work one day surrounded by lovely, century-old houses, and came home that evening to find one of those homes and its trees gone; and over the following days and weeks another, and another, until eight houses were obliterated, along with all the trees. How all this was done in blatant violation of a Multi-Block Land Use Covenant signed by Children’s Hospital—a 14-block agreement which existed to protect every single home on my block, “Block 5,” and the other 13 blocks surrounding the hospitals.

Archives of Julie Miller’s previous articles on Block 5

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

MULTI-BLOCK LAND USE COVENANT Between Phillips Neighborhood and Neighborhood Health Related Organizations

Covenant: 1. A formal, solemn and binding agreement. 2. A written agreement or promise usually between two or more parties, especially for the performance of some action.  It is a declaration of intent by all parties who sign, to help each other achieve mutual objectives.

This covenant is a voluntary commitment made by individuals to themselves and to others.

Recognizing that all p[arties see mutual advantages of having strong sustainable medical facilities located in the Phillips Neighborhood and a stable surrounding residential area, we hereby enter into this relationship and goals.

  1. This covenant is between Phillips Neighborhood – (Districts 1 & 3 [Now called Phillips West and Midtown Phillips], Abbott Northwestern Hospital’s Community Advisory Committee (CAC) and all affiliated health organizations that operate under these organizations:
  2. Allina Health System
  3. Abbott Northwestern Hospital
  4. Children’s Hospitals and Clinics-Minneapolis and their successors.

The intent is to influence the location of other health facilities that operate, share land or have some service relationship with Allina Health System, Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Children’s Hospitals and Clinics-Minneapolis or its affiliates.

  1. This agreement covers land use and physical development, safety and liveability and other issues of mutual concern as they may arise.
  2. The parties to this agreement have the following shared goals for what should happen to the blocks surrounding the health use related campus. (Blocks numbered are keyed to the attached map.)

Block 1: This block should be designated for mixed use including light industry in the former Sears warehouse; and retail, housing, parking and health related uses/expansion in the remainder of the site should property become available. Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

“Baby Driver” & “The Big Sick”

(l to r) Buddy (Jon Hamm), Darling (Eiza Gonzalez), Baby (Ansel Elgort) and Bats (JAMIE FOXX) discuss the next heist in TriStar Pictures’ BABY DRIVER.

By Howard McQuitter II

“Baby Driver”(2017)

**** out of five

Action/Comedy/Drama/Music Rated R

Director Edgar Wright’s (I met him back when he directed “Shaun of the Dead”) “Baby Driver” is worth the ticket while lounging in a comfortable chair in a theater (or at home) on a summer day. The beauty of “Baby Driver” is the movie feels fresh, electrifying and humorous. For lack of a better word, the cast is cool.

Baby is the title character played by Ansel Elgort, a twenty-something, white guy who walks around with earphones listening to pop music, such as from “Queen”. Back-ground  music from old school R&B tunes Martha Reeves & The Vandellas “Nowhere to Hide” and Brenda Holloway’s “Every Little Bit Hurts” fill the air instead of what audiences may expect rap or hip hop music.

He is the getaway driver working for heist boss Doc (Kevin Spacey) along with three other lively characters Bats (Jamie Foxx), Griff (Jon Hamm), Darling (Eiza Gonzalez).All the action takes place in Atlanta, Georgia.

From the first time Bats meets Baby he doesn’t trust him and always finds a way to criticize him. All this is thrilling to Baby in spite of his foster father’s did-approval of the stolen money and the robberies. Then Baby meets a waitress Debora (Lily James) who he starts to fall for in turn the cool man with the earphones rethinks about his job description. After all, Doc wants Baby to go on the biggest heist thus far in their scheme. Yes, there is a dilemma for the young man: go ahead and do the job and risk being killed or get out altogether and pursue the girl.

Does “Baby Driver’s”  Edgar Wright takes a page out of Quentin Tarantino’s playbook? Adrenaline-driven, good car chases, looking for ways to escape should be what you’re looking for in Wright’s high-octane film.

Cast: Ansel Elgort (Baby), Jon Hamm (Griff), Eizaa Gonzalez (Darling), Kevin Spacey (Doc), Jamie Foxx (Bats), Lily James (Debora). Running time: 113 minutes. Director: Edgar Wright.

“The Big Sick”(2017)

*****

Comedy/Romance/Drama Rated R

It’s a delightful thing when chemistry, believable characters, and humor can be melted together in a romantic comedy. The risk for so many romantic comedies is a cross over to schmaltz or risqué or flat out frivolousness. “The Big Sick” is just one of those relatively few romantic comedies that embraces all three elements: chemistry, believable characters, and humor par excellence.

Kumail (Kumail Nanjiam) works the stand-up comedy circuits in Chicago along with two other stand-up comedians Bo Burnham and Kurt Braunohler. Kumail is Pakistani and his family live comfortably in a house in Chicago. His mother (Zenobia Shroff) and father (Anupan Kher) believe in arranged marriages as in Pakistani Muslim tradition. The mother invites potential Pakistani women to the house hoping her son will choose one of them. He doesn’t.

Kumail meets an American white woman, studying to be a therapist, initially their relationship looks like a one- night stand or a few sexual encounters, then split. The woman, Emily (Zoe Kazan), has far less camera time than Kumail has but, nonetheless, the chemistry is not lost in the fray. She has to be hospitalized for an unknown virus. When he shows up at the hospital her parents are there where he’s met with a cold shoulder, especially from her mother, Beth (Holly Hunter). And to think this, Emily, ordinary looking compared to the beautiful Pakistani women he rejected,,is someone he really loves.

(“The Big Sick” is based on a true story; Zoe looks similar to the real Emily.) Cast: Kumail Nanjiani (Kumail), Zoe Kazan (Emily), Holly Hunter (Beth), Ray Romano (Terry), Zenobia Shroff Sharmeen), Anupam Kher (Azmat), Adeel Akhtar (Naveed). Running time: 119 minutes. Director: Micheal Showalter.

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

The Great Makers Exchange Highlights Nordic Craft and Artisans: Mini-Workshops, Demonstrations and an Artist Market

Hands-on Nordic Craft celebrating and learning for all ages with workshops, demonstrations, an artist market, live music and a talk by Tia Salmela Keobounpheng; noon – 5 pm Sunday, Aug. 6th; Mini-Workshops at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Entrance included in ASI Museum Admission:  $10 Adults, $7 ages 62+, $5 Students with ID and youth ages 5-12. FREE for ASI members. Workshop Reg. is $25.

Beginners, professionals and the curious can all find something to experience. Watch how it’s done and take home a finished work that you’ve crafted during a workshop or purchased from an artist.  Master craftspeople and ASI resident instructors— woodworkers, painters, weavers, textile artists, ceramicists and jewelers, lead the workshops for youth and adults. Partner organizations: FOCI Minnesota Center for Glass Arts, North House Folk School, Silverwood Park and Women’s Woodshop

Live Music:

12:30 – The Hunky Dory Scandinavian All-Stars;

1:30 – Tjärnblom

Featured Maker Talk and Art Installation: – 1p.m., Practicing CreativityFinnish-American designer/jewelry maker Tia Salmela Keobounpheng

Interactive Water Color Station with Artist-in-Residence Tara Sweeney

Ongoing: Craft & Design Focused Micro-Tours of the Turnblad Mansion

Makers Market in the ASI Courtyard

Makers Market Artists and Workshop Instructors:

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

When government ceases to protect the citizen ceases to owe allegiance!

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Frank Reflections: A Good Deed: Deed Hiawatha Golf Course back to Hiawatha’s descendants!

BY FRANK ERICKSON

In regards to what should be done with the land known as Hiawatha Golf Course at 4553 Longfellow Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55407: give it back to Hiawatha!

When an opportunity like this presents itself, it needs to be embraced and the right thing done!

Giving the land back to its rightful owners is the right thing to do.  Giving the land to the local Native American Community would not hurt the City of Minneapolis or any of its residents in any way.

The White Man has unjustly taken, controlled, and profited from owning all of this North American land for long enough—Time to give a little back!

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
 Page 2 of 156 « 1  2  3  4  5 » ...  Last »