NEWS & VIEWS OF PHILLIPS SINCE 1976
Tuesday December 12th 2017

Keep citizen journalism alive!

Donatebutton_narrow

Archives

Transit: Reduced Schedules and Minimal Shelters

BY JOHN CHARLES WILSON

Good news for Nicollet Mall bus riders: The Hennepin Avenue detour that has plagued you for the past two years finally ends the 2nd of December!

My primary topic this month is “Reduced Service” days, which vary from year to year but usually include Black Friday, Christmas Eve (or the day after Christmas if Christmas is on a Sunday), and either the 3rd or 5th of July, depending on what day of the week the 4th is. Last year there were also some reductions for New Year’s Eve, which weren’t as severe as for the other days. I don’t know if that’s intended to be a new, ongoing trend.

Usually, the Reduced schedule is a “Saturday plus” schedule, where most routes are on Saturday schedule, with a few extra buses on some routes, especially the rush-hour expresses, because some poor suckers still have to work. The 2016 New Year’s Eve schedule, however, was more of a “weekday minus” – regular schedule minus a few buses.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

THE CEMETERY’S Eldest Morgan Jones – 60 YEARS A SLAVE, 41 YEARS FREEDMAN

Morgan Jones said, “In 1823, I moved with my white masters to Missouri. I then became coachman for the family and was with them until the emancipation proclamation. As coachman I was able to look about and take notice, and you may be sure that I watched the growth of the abolition movement. As soon as the slaves were pronounced free, I started for Minnesota and have been in Minneapolis ever since. There have been several negroes in the state that have lived to be over 100, but I believe that I am the oldest in the city now and probably in the northwest.”

BY TIMOTHY McCALL

Undoubtedly, Morgan Jones saw many changes in his long life and having passed away at the age of 101 years, he also has the distinction of being the oldest person buried at Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery.

Morgan was born into slavery on a Virginia plantation on August 10, 1805. We’re fortunate to know the exact date of Morgan’s birth because in 1904, Morgan’s daughter had contacted his former owners, the Chappell family, in St. Louis, Missouri. The Chappell family were among the earliest Europeans to settle in America, arriving about 1635. They also must have been very prodigious record keepers, since they had kept and preserved many of the records from the old Virginia plantation where Morgan was born, including the record of his birth.

In an article from the Minneapolis Journal in 1905, Morgan relates some of his earliest memories:

“My earliest recollections are of the old plantation days in Virginia. I can remember the big white house of the ‘family’ and the little negro cabins. I spent my early years in the tobacco fields. I was a giant in those days and was told by a slave dealer and my master that I was the strongest one of my race in the south. I was never afraid to work, and of all the 140 or 150 negroes, I was the only one who never felt the lash. In the fields I was so tall that the overseer never noticed me burying my bare feet in the cool earth. I can remember at the close of the day the other workers struggled home with blistered feet, while mine never suffered, thanks to the burying.”

“In 1823, I moved with my white masters to Missouri. I then became coachman for the family and was with them until the emancipation proclamation. As coachman I was able to look about and take notice, and you may be sure that I watched the growth of the abolition movement. As soon as the slaves were pronounced free, I started for Minnesota and have been in Minneapolis ever since. There have been several negroes in the state that have lived to be over 100, but I believe that I am the oldest in the city now and probably in the northwest.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Midtown Phillips Neighborhood Association News-December 2017

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

EPIC Report-December 2017

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

December 2017 Ventura Village

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Lady Bird

“Lady Bird” (2017)

Studio A24

*****

“Lady Bird” is the most refreshing film on adolescence in a long time. Thanks to Greta Gerwig, her directional debut is fantastic, everything is in place, keen, realistic, charming and humorous (and serious, too) all in the right spots. Yes, adolescence is a turbulent, experimental, and growing time in life that seem often to work against him or her. Then the adolescent has to be under the roof of parents, oh, those people we call parents, the ones hopefully to guide into adulthood. Values, good ones –well, pray those ones be the frontrunner.

“Lady Bird’ is the title character played by Saoirse Ronan (“Brooklyn” [2015), in large part has a turbulent relationship with her mother, Marion McPherson (Laurie Metcalf). Her mother tells her and her father Larry (Tracy Letts) cannot afford to send her to Columbia, Yale or Penn and barely can afford to send her to a college in California (where they live), Sacramento to be exact. “Lady Bird”, whose real name is Christine, doesn’t want to go to Catholic college, she’s already at a Catholic high school with not the best of grades.

“Lady Bird” (perhaps Greta at Lady Bird’s age) go through what most teenagers do is find someone they like. Her boy she goes for is Danny (Lucas Hedges) who’s a nice kid, rather shy and reserved. However, the relationship is dashed discovering he’s gay. The next boy, named Kyle (Timothee Chalancet) she falls for is bombastic and self- centered.

Lady Bird’s best friend Julie Steffans (Beanie Feldstein) exchange little things as Julie remarks,” What about terrorism?”, curiously Lady Bird responses,” Don’t be Republican”. Lady Bird’s sentiment about Sacramento, she sarcastically says the city Is like “the Midwest of California”. Her goal is to leave Sacramento for the East coast, but is frustrated by her parents who cannot afford to send her there as well as her grades are so-so at best. One of her teachers, Sister Sarah Joan (Lois Smith) finds the young woman promising down the road.

It is disturbing Lady Bird disrespects her mother even by scrawling “f__k you mom” on her pink cast after injuring herself in a fit of anger. She and Julie get caught eating unconsecrated communion hosts by another student. Another incident in an assembly of students in the gymnasium as a teacher tells a true story about the ills of abortion, Lady Bird cruelly snaps back at her by saying an abortion by her mother means she wouldn’t have to listen to her. Read the rest of this entry »

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

The Killing of a Sacred Deer

“The Killing of a Sacred Deer”(2017)

Drama/Thriller/Mystery

Studio A24

**** out of five stars

Heart-wrenching is what «The Killing of a Sacred Deer» is with irony of a doctor performing open-heart surgery in the opening scenes. Doctor Steven Murphy (Colin Farrell) is seen in a beautiful hospital standing outside his office talking to a teenage boy named Martin (Barry Keogham) who has made an unscheduled visit to see the doctor. Apparently, Steven is the one who operated on his father; who, sadly, has deceased. Steven takes an interest in Martin, a kid seemingly with few friends, a classic loner, someone in need for another person to talk to since his father is gone. Steven invites the lad over to his house to meet his ophthalmologist wife Anna (Nicole Kidman), and children,12-year old Bob (Sunny Suljic) and 14-year-old Kim (Raffey Cassidy). Martin takes up the invitation at the Murphys’ house with “normal” interactions.

There is one scene in the movie where a watch may or may not be a key to Greek director Yorgos Lanthimos’ (“The Lobster”) enigmatic, dark, oddball film. One of the characters says about a watch, “I prefer a metal strap.” (Alfred Hitchcock often uses a bird, such as in “The Birds” and “Topaz” for something ominous to follow.) When Steven visits Martin’s house, meeting his mom (Alicia Silverson) all three watch the movie, “Groundhog Day”. By this time, the film enters into strange to very strange, especially when Martin leaves the room leaving Steven and Martin’s mom alone. She tries to seduce him, but he takes off never to accept another invitation.

Martin vacillates between a weird stilted personality and to a psychological vengeful personality. One can only guess Martin is on a trail that creates serious problems which makes “The Killing of a Sacred Deer” a vibrate thriller, a terrifying, haunting film telling the audience in subtle ways: be careful who one embraces as a friend. And if there is any comparison to other directors with enigmatic, thought-provoking themes one can watch Michael Haneke films, or Chan-wook Park, or take one of David Lynch’s works. Both Steven and Martin’s lives become interwoven for the worst. Just look at director Barrbet Schroeder’s 1992 movie “Single White Female “to see how appearances can be deceiving, yes, even down a deadly path.

The title “The Killing of a Sacred Deer” is a metaphor from Greek mythology when Agamemnon wants to send his ships to Troy, but because of no wind the ships couldn’t get there. In turn he pleads to the gods to cause strong winds to carry his ships to Troy. The gods say they will send the winds only if he sacrifices his daughter. But just as he is about to carry out the act, the gods turn his daughter into a deer. Then Agamemnonas kills a sacred deer.

Cast: Colin Farrell (Dr. Steven Murphy), Nicole Kidman Anna Murphy), Barry Keogham (Martin), Alicia Silverland (Martin’s Mother), Raffey Cassidy (Kim), Bill Camp (another doctor), Denise Dal Vera (Mary Williams), Sunny Suljic (Bob). (R) Director: Yorgos Lanthimos. Running time: 119 minutes. Written by: Yorgos Lanthimos.

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Superbowl Quarantine

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

FRANK REFLECTIONS: Whose land is “Our” land?

BY FRANK ERICKSON

Homelessness within the Native American Community is much higher than the white community. What white Europeans have done to Native Americans is beyond words.

The most important issue our society will deal with in the next 100 years is–who has the right to own things around here.

My ancestors come here, unjustly take the land, and then play capitalism into the equation. So the wickedness grows every day as the white landlords continue to raise rents and the rate of homelessness among Natives only increases, the chance to get a roof over their heads becomes further out of reach.

Greed is just the surface problem. The whites have no right to own the land and the commerce.

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Vietnam and Naked Truth

By Peter Molenaar

A good part of our neighborhood gave its attention to THE VIETNAM WAR on public television. For my generation, the series was an edifying reminder of that war’s impact upon our inner-being.

Kent State Massacre, May 4, 1970…

Nixon’s people informed the grief stricken parents: You should be happy your son was killed, he was “just another communist”. Who were these “communists”?

As far as I know, the Communists thought it was wrong to compel working-class youth to war on behalf of capitalists who wanted space for the deindustrialization of our country… thereby smashing our jobs base, our unions, and our wages.

Then later, 1979. In the northeast corner of the Smith Foundry shower room at 1855 E. 28th Street:

I was stark naked with my back to the corner, while an African-American Korean War veteran taunted me. Evidently, the Mai Leis of that war had resurfaced. I asked him: Would you kill a man who had faced down the Klan in Jim Crow Mississippi? My efforts, ten years prior, to register voters in that state wound up saving my butt.

2017, a road trip rendezvous via online dating… exit the Cities on Hwy. 52 south, then exit at Hwy. 56 to discover Wanamingo (pop. 1,086):

Here, the melting glaciers created ravines into which the people drove the buffalo, thousands of years ago. Copper miners to the north received dried meat and processed hides in exchange for their goods. Women ran much of the show and were not abused. Everything was shared.

What name should we call a people who did not require slave holders or capitalists to explain the meaning of freedom?

Further down the road, I would meet my date at the old Hubble Hotel in Mantorville. She had met her once husband in the Philippines, during his R & R from the war. Air Force communications was his expertise. Her first language was a dialect of Tagalog mixed with Spanish.

I spoke of Vietnamese girls running naked down the road, their skin melting away from the effects of napalm. Tears welled in her eyes, yet before parting, she gave me a hug which would not let go.

Share this with your friends:
  • email
  • Print
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
 Page 2 of 163 « 1  2  3  4  5 » ...  Last »