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Edible Boulevards Community Resources for Spring

Edible Boulevards Community Resources for Spring

.embed-container {position: relative; padding-bottom: 80%; height: 0; max-width: 100%;} .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container iframe{position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;} small{position: absolute; z-index: 40; bottom: 0; margin-bottom: -15px;} By MICHELLE SHAW Do you live in Cedar Riverside, Ventura Village, Midtown Phillips, Phillips West or East Phillips? If so, that means you live in the Southside Green Zone and you’re eligible to apply for participation in the Minneapolis Edible Boulevards initiative. We have funding to go towards teaching people how to transform the space between the sidewalk and curb into an edible boulevard, in addition to free soil testing, seeds, organic soil, compost, garden gloves, and a trowel if you need one. The application is posted on our Minneapolis Edible Boulevards Facebook page, which we invite you to join. We’re excited to announce a few new community resources that we’ve just completed as a result of a grant we received through the Joint Green Zones Task Force. Janicea Coney, Julius Rennie and Michelle Shaw spent the last three months creating three community resources that can all be found on our Facebook page: the Green Zones Community Garden Map, the Minneapolis Edible Boulevards Map, and the Minneapolis Green Zones Plant-based Budding Directory. The Green Zones Community Garden Map lists the locations of community gardens where neighbors can grow their own food, harvest food when they need it, and/or volunteer. Please let us know if there are community gardens as described above that we've missed or if any of those listed are no longer active. View the map at https://arcg.is/q0fTD The Minneapolis Edible Boulevards Map lists the cross streets for each participant's site and gives essential companion data discovered through our soil testing process: lead levels for every site, arsenic levels for 2020 participants and salt levels for a few select [...]

What happened to my old polling place? Redistricting!

What happened to my old polling place? Redistricting!

Article #1 in a series about the 2022 midterm elections; brought to you by the League of Women Voters of Minneapolis Left: 2022 State House district boundaries of Phillips Right: 2022 City Council wards in black, former boundary in red It’s spring — flowers are blooming, birds are singing, and the Hennepin County Elections office is sending postcards to registered voters. You may find that your voting district and polling place have changed. What happened? In 2022, many people will experience a change in their voting district. This process is called redistricting, and it happens every ten years, as states, counties, and cities across the country adjust their political boundaries to fit new census numbers. Because the population of Minnesota has changed, the sizes and boundaries of congressional, state, and local districts need to adapt so that each has approximately the same number of people. That will ensure that the value of each vote remains equal. In Minnesota the process starts with the legislature and governor. The political parties redraw maps for our eight congressional, state legislature, and metropolitan council districts. It can be tempting for parties to try to design these areas for their own particular advantage, sometimes resulting in weird shapes and unusual inclusions. This is called gerrymandering. Our system in Minnesota is set up to avoid gerrymandering. Here, when the parties and the governor don’t agree, as has happened for the past 50 years, the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court appoints a redistricting panel to draw new boundaries. The panel completed its work in February. When congressional and state legislative boundaries are determined, local redistricting begins. Cities, county boards, and school districts set their own local boundaries. The Minneapolis Charter Commission, with the help of an advisory group, and input from the community, draws the maps for Park Board districts and the city’s wards and [...]

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